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Eric Vaxxine
2006-Jan-09, 03:20 PM
During the Stardust capsule's blazing re-entry at 1:57 a.m. PST Sunday, it will travel at 29,000 mph, making it the fastest man-made object to return to Earth.

The 100-pound cargo will arc over Northern California toward Utah's Dugway Proving Ground, a remote Army base southwest of Salt Lake City.

Residents in parts of Northern California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Nevada and Utah should see the Stardust capsule as it streaks across the pre-dawn sky. Prime viewing will be along Nevada's Interstate 80 where residents can view the capsule's front.


CNN

Squink
2006-Jan-09, 10:08 PM
Cool! Oddly enough I had to delay a road trip to California for a week, and thus will find myself near Elko Nevada on Sunday night. Now If I can just get my Alarm clock to work, and my camera functioning without coffee I might get some pix of this! :dance:

redshifter
2006-Jan-09, 10:37 PM
You have one of those new cameras that run on coffee? :)

Squink
2006-Jan-10, 06:04 AM
If I feed it espresso it'll even take movies.;)

cyswxman
2006-Jan-11, 12:05 AM
Wonder if it'll produce a sonic boom, or is it too small to produce a decent one?

01101001
2006-Jan-11, 02:16 AM
Ah, today the San Jose Mercury (http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/living/health/) (registration may be required) had in print a full page plus a little more (page 3A, In Depth), on Stardust.

They gave viewing advice that went beyond the "Interstate 80 corridor in Nevada" advice I saw at the JPL (or NASA) site.

One of their sidebar graphics had a nice map showing degrees above horizon for southern Washington state, Oregon, and northern California (as well as southwest Idaho, Nevada and western Utah.

San Jose for instance is at about the 12-degree line. Reno 25 degrees. Crescent City, probably maximum, about 60 degrees. Portland 15 degrees; Seattle 10 degrees.

Advice for Bay Area residents, in a related article:


Although the resulting fireball could be brighter than Venus and
set off a sonic boom as it soars over Nevada and Utah, the view
will not be as spectacular from California, said Peter Jenniskens
of the SETI Institute in Mountain View, who is organizing the
observations. "The fireball will be relatively low in the sky,''
he said, "and at the time it reaches peak brightness we'll be
seeing it from the rear.'' For the best shot, go to a dark spot
with a clear view of the horizon to the north, northwest and
northeast. Bring binoculars or a camcorder, and watch the clock:
The capsule is scheduled to re-enter the atmosphere at 39 seconds
past 1:56 a.m. PST, give or take four seconds.

Fr. Wayne
2006-Jan-15, 05:19 AM
This national Park, though south, may be best site according to http://reentry.arc.nasa.gov/viewingforum.html. All sites north of this will probably be stormy and cloudy.

Peak optical brightness: -7 magnitude (visible: 548 nm)
Date: January 15, 2006 (night time)
Time: nighttime (about 2:56:39 a.m. MST, 1:56:39 a.m. PST)
Mass: 45.8 kg
Diameter: 0.811 meter
Speed: 12.8 km/s (at 135 km)
Entry angle: 8 degrees
Landing site: U.S. Air Force Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR)
Heat-shield material: Phenol impregnated Carbon
Sample return: comet P/Wild 2 dust from NASA sited above

Glom
2006-Jan-15, 02:04 PM
They're not trying that James Bond start with the helicopter like they tried with Genesis, are they?

01101001
2006-Jan-15, 06:50 PM
They're not trying that James Bond start with the helicopter like they tried with Genesis, are they?

The mid-air snag? Nope. The Stardust capsule was lighter and the contents were made of slightly sterner stuff, so they allowed Stardust's to land on the ground and suffer the few Gs of decelleration of impact.

The Genesis mid-air catch wasn't particulary stuntworthy though. It was a procedure thay had used in the past and they had opportunity to practice it with the selected players. There was ample opportunity to catch it, even if it took several tries -- if the Genesis chute had opened.

Fr. Wayne
2006-Jan-15, 07:02 PM
NASA-TV Live 5 am CST Monday
Duration: 4 hours
Live News Interviews on Stardust with Tom Duxbury, Don Yeomans, Gentry Lee - JPL (One-Way Media Interviews)

ToSeek
2006-Jan-16, 04:00 PM
The mid-air snag? Nope. The Stardust capsule was lighter and the contents were made of slightly sterner stuff, so they allowed Stardust's to land on the ground and suffer the few Gs of decelleration of impact.

The Genesis mid-air catch wasn't particulary stuntworthy though. It was a procedure thay had used in the past and they had opportunity to practice it with the selected players. There was ample opportunity to catch it, even if it took several tries -- if the Genesis chute had opened.

Yes, it wasn't the helicopters that failed, it was the parachute, or, more precisely, the sensors that told the capsule to release the parachute.

Launch window
2006-Jan-17, 11:43 AM
great work, Stardust has done a fantastic job - now to wait for the report on lab results

publiusr
2006-Jan-25, 09:19 PM
I seem to remember a blurb about how--during re-entry, Potassium was recorded. I wonder if a potash plant was upwind along the jet stream or if some other kind of haze from the desert was borne aloft on heated parcels of air over time--to collide with the dropshell before being dispersed by transport winds or settling back down. That region is know for alkaline soil--and I think there may be potash plants nearby.

Any ideas?