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View Full Version : Manned mission to Venus (hypothetical of course)



parallaxicality
2006-Jan-11, 03:43 PM
What would we need? What kind of ships/suits would be required? Would the trip through space be easier or harder? If we managed to get someone onto the surface, could we manage to get him/her off again?

Davros
2006-Jan-11, 04:11 PM
Much of this topic has been covered in this thread: http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=36030

Denis12
2006-Jan-11, 04:29 PM
The positive thing is that at the daylightside of venus is more than 100 days of (dimmed)because its closed cloudlayers,sunlight,thus that is not the problem. But the heat is a serious problem,that would need special ships to land ,and very special suits. I think it would be an very interesting mission,but not free of danger. And the trip to venus is dangerous too,because the intense sun radiation and sunheat,because you come closer to the sun. I really hope that a (manned) mission to venus is on the way very soon.Denis

The_Radiation_Specialist
2006-Jan-11, 05:09 PM
I really hope that a (manned) mission to venus is on the way very soon.
Dont bet on it ;)

Doodler
2006-Jan-13, 08:43 PM
I bet that rotor based launcher would do rather well in the superdense air down there. If you could keep the blades from melting, they've got PLENTY to scoop up for lift. Your average helicopter ceilings around 17500 feet on Earth, holding to that same principle on Venus, you could get a rotor lofted ship MUCH further before needing to kick in the boosters.

Saluki
2006-Jan-13, 08:51 PM
IMO, the pressure is a bigger issue than the heat. Don't get me wrong, both are seriously daunting issues.

Lord Jubjub
2006-Jan-14, 03:00 AM
How much does the sulfuric acid in the atmosphere add problems?

ryanmercer
2006-Jan-17, 01:33 PM
How much does the sulfuric acid in the atmosphere add problems?

From what I hear, its actually not really that bad.

Glom
2006-Jan-17, 01:46 PM
Isn't the sulphuric acid mostly in the upper atmosphere? It's the clouds isn't it?

Champion_Munch
2006-Jan-17, 01:50 PM
From what I hear, its actually not really that bad.

Would you take off your 464degree temperature/90 times normal atmospheric pressure withstanding helmet to take a sniff of the air? :)

Don't they believe there are also active volcanoes on Venus?

with regards

Doodler
2006-Jan-17, 02:09 PM
Would you take off your 464degree temperature/90 times normal atmospheric pressure withstanding helmet to take a sniff of the air? :)

Don't they believe there are also active volcanoes on Venus?

with regards

The last series of major eruptions was something like 750 million years ago.

hawaii50girl
2006-Jan-17, 09:05 PM
the science channel had a special people traveling to venus and some other planets can't remember the names of the planets. the show was called Voyage to The Planets i think that's what it was called.

TobiasTheViking
2006-Jan-22, 11:03 PM
funny, just 07 min into watching that.. They already claimed that this show is "science fact, not science fiction" .. :/

i couldn't believe it, hence google, which came up with this thread.. quite amusing imo.