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Denis12
2006-Jan-17, 12:55 AM
How can we explore an hypothetical planet at 1 lightyear from us? I think it will be a complete dark world,with only a sunrise and sunset of the brightness the same as sirius here at night,and with a lot of stars in the sky(the sun is a bright star) maybe with sirius the brightest. And to land on a (moonlike) planet at 1 lightyear distance you need strong lights to keep it visible in the darkness in your neighborhood,and the journey to the planet takes a long long long time. I think that there is a little change that there are escaped planets outside our solarsystem,escaped from other solarsystems that are at the end of their lifes,because of a sunlike star that has died long before. What are you thinking about this story? Let me know. Thanks. Denis.

01101001
2006-Jan-17, 01:02 AM
So, it's a lot like described in the thread you started just 2 weeks ago: 1 lightyear distance from the sun (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=36560) except now there's definitely a hypothetical planet there.

Are you really getting any value out of all these threads about hypothetical missions?

The_Radiation_Specialist
2006-Jan-17, 01:05 AM
One humble advice:
It would be, perhaps, better to use more paragraphs in your posts, as using only one paragraph for a relatively long post really clutters things out. Using several paragraphs might make your posts easier to read. ;)

Glom
2006-Jan-17, 01:51 PM
Are you really getting any value out of all these threads about hypothetical missions?

That's rather snide. Playing "what if?" games is part of the fun. After all, science fiction is about that, but it never does it very well, so we may as well do it right.


How can we explore an hypothetical planet at 1 lightyear from us? I think it will be a complete dark world,with only a sunrise and sunset of the brightness the same as sirius here at night,and with a lot of stars in the sky(the sun is a bright star) maybe with sirius the brightest. And to land on a (moonlike) planet at 1 lightyear distance you need strong lights to keep it visible in the darkness in your neighborhood,and the journey to the planet takes a long long long time. I think that there is a little change that there are escaped planets outside our solarsystem,escaped from other solarsystems that are at the end of their lifes,because of a sunlike star that has died long before. What are you thinking about this story? Let me know. Thanks. Denis.

I thought for a moment I could use my C++ program, but alas no. Anyway, I don't think you need particularly strong lights. Just use the lights you would use to explore a cave or something. One thing I do know. We'd need a hell of a delta v.

Relmuis
2006-Jan-17, 02:45 PM
One would need the same kind of technology needed to reach nearby stars.

To explore the planet, if it isn't a gas giant (which it almost would have to be, if it had been detected from 1 light year away without benefit of sunlight) one would need the same kind of technology needed to explore Pluto. Except, that one would need artificial lighting to see the surface (i.e. every descent would be a descent at midnight.)

If it is a gas giant, one would need the same kind of technology needed to explore the known gas giants of our Solar System.

Except -- and this is the only really interesting option -- if it has lost all its internal heat, which would mean that all gases, except helium, would be frozen solid. As hydrogen is lighter than helium, this helium would proably not form a planet-covering ocean, but would fill al kinds of nooks and crannies deep inside the frozen mass. And of course, the surface would be exposed to the vacuum of space.

Gravity on the surface of such a planet (an ice giant?) would be much higher than even on Jupiter, perhaps around 20 or 30 times Earth gravity. I think this would preclude any idea of a manned mission to the surface, though perhaps machines could be built to withstand such gravity.

Denis12
2006-Jan-17, 03:25 PM
If it is a moonlike planet at 1 lightyear distance,then we can land there ,like the apollo missions,but (without) sunlight. But the greatest problem is the very long yourney to it. If the voyager or pioneer spacecrafts are on route to the 1 lightyear distance planet,how many years will it take before they reached the planet at 1 lightyear? Denis.

Kesh
2006-Jan-17, 05:49 PM
That's rather snide. Playing "what if?" games is part of the fun. After all, science fiction is about that, but it never does it very well, so we may as well do it right.

I think the point was more to the fact that there's already a thread on this subject, created by the same author. There's no need to have a second one.

The_Radiation_Specialist
2006-Jan-17, 05:51 PM
lets see, voyagers would take 40000 years getting to nearest star 4.2 ly. so going with the speed of voyagers it would take about 10 thousand years to get to 1 ly distances from the sun. Not your average human life span.

Metricyard
2006-Jan-17, 07:20 PM
lets see, voyagers would take 40000 years getting to nearest star 4.2 ly. so going with the speed of voyagers it would take about 10 thousand years to get to 1 ly distances from the sun. Not your average human life span.

Really. Why bother with a hypothetical planet when we have such a diversity of planets and moons in our own back yard to explore?

I have to ask, why all these hypothetical questions? There must be a reason for them. Curiosity? Boredom?

John Dlugosz
2006-Jan-17, 08:24 PM
I think that there is a little change that there are escaped planets outside our solarsystem,escaped from other solarsystems that are at the end of their lifes,because of a sunlike star that has died long before. What are you thinking about this story? Let me know. Thanks. Denis.

Current models of solar system formation indicate a hundred or so planetary embrios, some of which crashed into the sun and some of which were ejected.

If that's true of all systems, where are all these ejected worldlets now?

As for lights to land, why not use radar?