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suntrack2
2006-Jan-17, 04:48 PM
imagine, if the sun splits in two parts with a equal mass and keeping a sufficient distance between the part1 and part2, so how the things will be work out?


1. the solar wind will be wick?
2. massive effects may fall on the earth's activities?
3. sun's functionality will be change?
4. sun's appearence will be change?
5. we will not be able to experience the elipse of sun?


sunil

hhEb09'1
2006-Jan-17, 05:00 PM
and astrologers will become bipolar

aurora
2006-Jan-17, 05:06 PM
If the sun had a different mass (in your example, two suns each with 0.5 Sol mass) then the energy output would be different.

I'm pretty sure that two suns of 0.5 solar mass would not have the same energy output as one sun of 1.0 solar mass.

Grey
2006-Jan-17, 05:24 PM
imagine, if the sun splits in two parts with a equal mass and keeping a sufficient distance between the part1 and part2, so how the things will be work out?Well, first of all, we'll assume that the two halves are also set to revolving around each other, so they don't just immediately collapse back into a single star. In that case, we'd be orbiting a close binary, consisting of two stars with a half a solar mass each. Note that, unlike your picture, the two halves would each form a sphere, more or less. Also note that the amount of energy that would be required to accomplish this feat would be astonishingly huge, even on stellar scales.


1. the solar wind will be wick?
2. massive effects may fall on the earth's activities?
3. sun's functionality will be change?
4. sun's appearence will be change?
5. we will not be able to experience the elipse of sun?So, the Sun would appear as two smaller stars, close together. The overall gravitational pull would be the same, so apart from more perturbations (because it's no longer spherically symmetrical or static), the orbits of the planets would remain about the same. The planets closer inward would have the most significant orbital changes, of course.

The biggest difference is that the total luminosity of a main sequence stars scales with mass to the ~3.5th power. That means that two stars, each with half the mass of the Sun, only put out together about a sixth as much energy as the Sun does. That's a big drop, and we'd see the biggest ice age ever come on as the mean temperature of the Earth steadily fell. The mean surface temperature of the two stars would drop by a couple thousand Kelvins, so they'd appear distinctly red or red-orange.

I doubt there would be a dramatic effect on the solar wind, other than the fact that it's probably lower for the smaller, less active stars.

Depending on the orbital configurations, we might still be able to see solar eclipses. We'd certainly expect to see an eclipse of one or the other star, but if things are right, it might also be possible to have both lined up with one behind the other just as the moon passes in front of them. This would of course be much rarer.

All around, this would be a bad plan. Fortunately, I can't imagine any way for it to happen. ;)

Kesh
2006-Jan-17, 05:34 PM
The first question would have to be: Why did the sun split?

Any phenomenon that could accomplish such a feat would have a vast impact on the solar system. Moreso, I dare say, than the simple fact of us suddenly living in a binary system.

Enzp
2006-Jan-18, 05:39 AM
It is the point at which we discover that the sun is a living organism, and we are witnessing solar cell division.

ChrisRT
2006-Jan-18, 07:23 AM
I'd like to also get a question in.

The Sun is mainly gas but since it does absorb debris like comets, asteroids, and possibly planets wouldn’t it have a solid core (assuming that all the debris sinks to the core)? What would happen to this core?
Also, would the sun suddenly torn red/red-orange or would it be gradual? Lastly, how would this orange or reddish orange Sun appear to us on Earth?

Fram
2006-Jan-18, 09:51 AM
The debris that gets in the Sun changes into gas, due to the enormous temperatures and pressure. There is nothing solid there.