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Lianachan
2006-Jan-20, 08:30 AM
Nikola Tesla was a great scientist and engineer - how can we go about claiming him back from the woo-woos (http://ghostpopulace.atomspies.com/teslarthechosen.htm)?

He had to go and start talking about death rays, didn't he.

enginelessjohn
2006-Jan-20, 09:49 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_flux_density

There's a start...

Cheers
John

Lianachan
2006-Jan-20, 10:37 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_flux_density

There's a start...


Indeed - but that unit is probably not that widely known among the Great Unwashed. Stop a random person in the street and ask them what the word "Tesla" means to them and they're unlikely to start talking about that.

Nicolas
2006-Jan-20, 12:12 PM
Not a death ray, but a field of 1 Tesla (IIRC) is very dangerous. It attracts metal at extreme forces. So when you're doing nice balancing things with metal tools in a 1 Tesla field and you drop the tool, it will fall to the ground and start to SPEED towards the flux source. There it will slam into it, and the results will be nasty. Like quite some other units, the unit value of the Tesla is an extremely large value.

teri tait
2006-Jan-20, 02:26 PM
Plus he was a stone cold fine looking man! (Very threatening to the lesser cute) Here in the US there are small gestures, like 'Tesla Day'. I wrote to the Smithsonian countless emails admonishing them on their pathetic display of Dr. Teslas' spectrum of impact on society and (literally) life as we know it today.
Smithsonian minions never replied...until I sent an email to every email address I could find associated with their site.
I was then frostily told my phrasing (you suck) was inappropriate and they were the Magazine, Not the Museum, but they would pass my thoughts on to the museum schmucks.
All I got from them was an email stating they now had my name on a 'list' they keep, apparently a list reserved for those annoying peeps such as yours truly. I never heard anything back from 'they' again.
I did hear from the Tesla Society, the one in NY, they ROCK!

Lianachan
2006-Jan-20, 02:31 PM
Plus he was a stone cold fine looking man! (Very threatening to the lesser cute) Here in the US there are small gestures, like 'Tesla Day'. I wrote to the Smithsonian countless emails admonishing them on their pathetic display of Dr. Teslas' spectrum of impact on society and (literally) life as we know it today.
Smithsonian minions never replied...until I sent an email to every email address I could find associated with their site.
I was then frostily told my phrasing (you suck) was inappropriate and they were the Magazine, Not the Museum, but they would pass my thoughts on to the museum schmucks.
All I got from them was an email stating they now had my name on a 'list' they keep, apparently a list reserved for those annoying peeps such as yours truly. I never heard anything back from 'they' again.
I did hear from the Tesla Society, the one in NY, they ROCK!

Excellent :-)

Yes, it's all awareness isn't it. Plus the wider problem of the unquestioning acceptance of such nonsense as that which I linked to in my opening post. Sadly, this is by no means confined to matters Tesla.

teri tait
2006-Jan-20, 02:38 PM
I have spent many years on the internet and such researching everything I could find on Dr. Tesla, I have never found his poetry, I would dearly love to read that!
He was/is always at the top of his game(s), that's what I love about him! He spoke his mind and didn't worry! Plus, he wasn't interested in profit, he just wanted enough capital to fund his research, what a man!!!

Sammy
2006-Jan-20, 03:30 PM
I do not deny his brilliance or his contribution to the modern world. I don't see major accomplishements after his first burst of genius, which transformed (no pun intended) the world. BUT, he also had some very bizzare ideas both in science and and in other realms

He became committed to schemes for the wireless tramsmission of energy (for use at the endpoint, not for information transfer) which had no real basis for practical application, and he dabbled with death rays.

Later in life, he showed major psychiatric symptoms, particularly regarding pigeons. He belived that his mother had been reincarnated as a white pigeon which he fed, and he feed numerous other pigeons in his aparment by keeping a window open so they could fly in and out at will.

Because of these problems, he fell out of mainstream science and industry. I think it is this factor which energizes the woo woo community, which sees him as ostracized by TPTB because his great "breakthroughs" threatened their economic interests.

kylenano
2006-Jan-20, 05:17 PM
When I lived in London I used to see this train from time to time: Silverlink Metro No.313 116 Nikola Tesla (http://www.lococarriage.org.uk/percy_drummond.htm). Even travelled on it!

JohnW
2006-Jan-20, 05:24 PM
Can anyone recommend a good non-woowoo biography?

teri tait
2006-Jan-20, 05:34 PM
Can anyone recommend a good non-woowoo biography?

All biographies are somewhat limited and of course slanted with the views of the writer. A pretty good one is:

"Wizard: Man Out of Time"

It was written by his grand nephew and in the forward he debunks several of the legends of Dr. Teslas' allegedly odd mannerisms. ;)
Plus it has a lot of pictures of that handsome rogue! :)
6'6" Man of lightning! It is hard to find full length photos that are closeup. (not sitting down I mean)

Doodler
2006-Jan-20, 06:21 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alternating_Current


It is generally accepted that Nikola Tesla chose 60 hertz as the lowest frequency that would not cause street lighting to flicker visibly.

Tesla's 60Hz standard actually made it into the Information Age. 60Hz is generally considered the lowest refresh frequency to which a monitor can be set and not cause painfully (literally painful, especially white screens) obvious flickering.

Sammy
2006-Jan-20, 09:28 PM
All biographies are somewhat limited and of course slanted with the views of the writer. A pretty good one is:

"Wizard: Man Out of Time"

It was written by his grand nephew and in the forward he debunks several of the legends of Dr. Teslas' allegedly odd mannerisms. ;)
Plus it has a lot of pictures of that handsome rogue! :)
6'6" Man of lightning! It is hard to find full length photos that are closeup. (not sitting down I mean)

I think you're confusing two diffeerent books. "Wizard" has woo woo overtomes, but does not "debunl his paychopathology:

From the Publisher's Weekly review



Yet the electronic wizard, who competed fiercely with Marconi and with his one-time employer Edison, became swamped in debt, abandoned by a world he helped create, ending his days in seedy poverty, a bitter, anorexic eccentric obsessed with feeding pigeons and avoiding germs. Seifer, who teaches psychology at Community College of Rhode Island, attributes Tesla's downfall partly to his megalomaniacal, neurotic, self-destructive tendencies, partly to a quagmire of litigation and also to his Faustian pact with his ambivalent benefactor, Wall Street financier J. Pierpont Morgan, to whom he relinquished control of several patents. Morgan, suggests Seifer, stymied Tesla's visionary scheme for a global, wireless power-distribution system because, if realized, it would jeopardize electrical, lighting and telephone monopolies. Seifer provides the fullest account yet of Tesla as an entrepreneur, experimental physicist and inventor
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?userid=uj4EAzMCTN&pwb=1&ean=9780806519609

Woo woo content in italics

"Man Out of Time" is by Margaret Chaney (don't recall if they are related) and is highly woo woo IMO. She recites stories of his frequent Tesla Coil demonstrations of RF-generated corona as if they were important scientific breakthroughs.

I'm not aware of any non-woo woo bios which examine his scientific work. Too bad, because it would be fascinating.

Nicolas
2006-Jan-20, 09:36 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alternating_Current



Tesla's 60Hz standard actually made it into the Information Age. 60Hz is generally considered the lowest refresh frequency to which a monitor can be set and not cause painfully (literally painful, especially white screens) obvious flickering.

Lights work at 50Hz overhere. I can barely stand a 60Hz CRT screen myself, 75 is my minimum comfortable frequency but I prefer 100 for longer periods (which is rather logical :)). I don't care about 50 Hz lightbulbs. The flickering of TL tubes at 50Hz sometimes bothers me though (bad starters or what are it sometimes play a role though, making it flicker at much less than 50 Hz), while some other claim it gives such an easy light. And they interfere with the turntable sound, hooligan lights! :D

teri tait
2006-Jan-21, 02:37 AM
Well all books, biographies included, are written from the authors viewpoint. You will never find any biography that does not contain the imprinted opinion of the author.

The book "Wizard" has many good points and some bad. The foreward by his grandnephew is probably the closest you will ever find of a naked view of the "real" man that is Nikola Tesla.
The book itself was written by Marc J. Seifer.
If you want a broad view of what Tesla was really about you have to dig deeper than a neatly packaged book written by an individual, do some real research and you will be amazed. When I say "real research" I mean serious reading from a variety of sources, not one google search.

soylentgreen
2006-Jan-21, 02:54 AM
I wonder how his reputation will make out after the film THE PRESTIGE is released in theatres. The film about Christian Bale and Hugh Jackman as rival magicians whose rivalry escalates to murder, has a supporting role with David Bowie(?!?)as Tesla himself.

I don't know anyone familiar with the source novel by Christopher Priest, so I can't say just how Tesla is handled.

Sadly, no matter how the film does, it will still reach more of the general public's impressionable eyes than all the intelligent volumes on him published in the last 30 years.

I've been involved in a similar kind of struggle to correct miseducation about Lincoln for the last 10 years. Thanks in no small part to films, it's uphill all the way!

teri tait
2006-Jan-21, 03:34 AM
They are advertising a biography of Lincoln to be shown on the history channel. Sounds pretty good from the ads. Lincoln was another person that shaped the present in many ways.
Dr. Tesla's greatest achievements are yet to be known or appreciated by 'Joe Sixpack' because no one has the patience to learn about someone never mentioned in 1st through 12 grade in Americas' public school system. I learned only looked at him out of curiosity because of some comments from my brother which sparked my mind. Then I discussed Dr. Tesla with a friend of mine that installed computer hardware in stealth bombers for the Air Force. His out of character replies during our discussion drew my interest deeper.
A googol of google searches and numerous serendipitus turns knocked me head over heels for this great man.
Is there no modern device that does not owe their rudimentry beginnings to one or more of Dr. Teslas prolific creative juices? This man makes all other inventors look like striplings, he is the greatest mind that ever lent itself to the betterment of man. (besides Jesus The Christ)

Sammy
2006-Jan-21, 06:28 AM
teri tait wrote


Is there no modern device that does not owe their rudimentry beginnings to one or more of Dr. Teslas prolific creative juices? This man makes all other inventors look like striplings, he is the greatest mind that ever lent itself to the betterment of man. (besides Jesus The Christ)

Other than their source of power via AC generation/distribution of which Tesla is rightly considered the parent, how do you relate Tesla's work to digital computers, lasers, nuclear reactors, and transistors (just to name a few)? You might also consider a few people like Feynman, Von Neuman, Rutherford, Hahn, Meitner, Fermi, Crick, Watson, and Bohr. Try a quick Google search on these folks and their contributions to human knowledge and see if you consider them to be "striplings."

I also suggest that you NOT assume that people posting on this forum do so on the basis of a quick Google search. You are not the first person to "discover" Tesla, and there are many people who are quite aware and well versed on his accomplishments and failings.

teri tait
2006-Jan-21, 06:39 AM
Wow, you seriously don't have a clue do you?

(Teri rolls eyes with compassion)

Why don't you take a gander at his 2700+ registered patents and get back to me on your question if you're still unsure...start with US patents and then look at the ones he registered in other countries.
(Sigh, sooo sadly ignorant sooo in need of knowledge...:()

GraniteBeach
2006-Jan-21, 07:17 AM
I think the larger issue is the fact that his bizarre interests, accomplishments, and proclivities (spiritual and technelogical) point to some kind of seriously abbherent origin. There is a lot more Teslar material (http://ghostpopulace.atomspies.com) than you have linked to. In fact, the link above is just the very beginning of the information about the history of this 'man.' Why are you so quick to dismiss?

Archer17
2006-Jan-21, 07:19 AM
Tesla was way ahead of his time IMO, probably a real genius, but he also had some reality issues. That's a fact terri.

They had a decent bio on Tesla on PBS a year or so ago, maybe you can petition your local affiliate for a copy/transcipt.

Sammy
2006-Jan-21, 03:52 PM
Wow, you seriously don't have a clue do you?

(Teri rolls eyes with compassion)

Why don't you take a gander at his 2700+ registered patents and get back to me on your question if you're still unsure...start with US patents and then look at the ones he registered in other countries.
(Sigh, sooo sadly ignorant sooo in need of knowledge...:()

Since you want to go ad hominem, you might want to consider that those of us with a clue know that getting a patent means only two things: no one else has patented the same finding, and the patent holder had the time/money to go through the patent process. It does not mean that the subject of the patent works or is at all feasible.

As an electronics hobbyist, a person who spent part of their professional career managing electronics research projects, and a devotee of technological history, I have probably read just about ALL the literature available on Tesla.

Sigh, so obviously a kid trying to play with the grown-ups...

teri tait
2006-Jan-21, 04:29 PM
I stand by what I wrote, witout Tesla there would not be an Information Age for us to disseminate the pros and cons of Dr. Tesla.

Of course he had a different perspective and way of doing things, that's part of all great thinkers throughout the ages, and probably one reason he was so creative.

It sounds like most of you don't want to reclaim Dr. Tesla, it sounds like most of you want to convince ME I am wrong to view Dr. Tesla as a major contributor to todays society.

For the record, I really don't care what or how many negative anecdotes or weird stories about Dr. Tesla anyone dredges up, he is the greatest inventor ever been and probably ever to be. Besides, I've probably already read them all once or twice anyway.

Get back to me after you've read everything written about Dr. Tesla, then I won't feel like I'm shouting at the deaf.

:)

ktesibios
2006-Jan-21, 05:40 PM
Well, polyphase AC remains the norm for power transmission and distribution (the reason high voltage power lines invariably have three current-carrying conductors is that they are three-phase circuits) and the polyphase induction motor is still the most common type of AC motor in sizes greater than one horsepower or so.

In that respect Tesla's work touches all of our lives every day. When you turn on a faucet in your house and water comes out, it's a safe bet that the pumps that drove it through the pipes were driven by three-phase motors. If you work or live in a large building, the air-conditioning system is probably dependent on three-phase motors. Electronically-driven polyphase induction motors are starting to displace commutator motors in electric traction, so the next time you take a train you just might be riding on one of Tesla's ideas.

I'd call the invention of polyphase AC a genuinely seminal development in engineering. Unfortunately, it's mostly invisible and giant sparks are so much more photogenic.

Sammy
2006-Jan-21, 06:34 PM
I stand by what I wrote, witout Tesla there would not be an Information Age for us to disseminate the pros and cons of Dr. Tesla.

Of course he had a different perspective and way of doing things, that's part of all great thinkers throughout the ages, and probably one reason he was so creative.

It sounds like most of you don't want to reclaim Dr. Tesla, it sounds like most of you want to convince ME I am wrong to view Dr. Tesla as a major contributor to todays society.

For the record, I really don't care what or how many negative anecdotes or weird stories about Dr. Tesla anyone dredges up, he is the greatest inventor ever been and probably ever to be. Besides, I've probably already read them all once or twice anyway.

Get back to me after you've read everything written about Dr. Tesla, then I won't feel like I'm shouting at the deaf.

:)

Enough. As far as I'm concerned, you're a troll and there is no point in trying to have an adult discussion. You obviously don't read what I've posted, and consequently don't respond to the points I've raised.

Wolverine
2006-Jan-21, 07:29 PM
teri tait: your tone and insulting comments in your posts here (http://www.bautforum.com/showpost.php?p=660695&postcount=19) and here (http://www.bautforum.com/showpost.php?p=660864&postcount=23) are wholly uncalled for. I've apprised you of our forum rules (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?p=564845#post564845) in the past -- you should know that this sort of behavior is not tolerated here.

Your account has been suspended for 48 hours for civility & decorum violations. Upon your return you are expected to follow our forum guidelines or you will be permanently banned.

Sammy: please do not respond in kind. If you have concerns about a member or post(s), make use of the Report feature so we may intervene as necessary.

Wolverine
2006-Jan-21, 11:53 PM
I think the larger issue is the fact that his bizarre interests, accomplishments, and proclivities (spiritual and technelogical) point to some kind of seriously abbherent origin. There is a lot more Teslar material (http://ghostpopulace.atomspies.com) than you have linked to. In fact, the link above is just the very beginning of the information about the history of this 'man.' Why are you so quick to dismiss?


GraniteBeach, please review and abide by our forum rules (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?p=564845#post564845).

This forum is not a means for you to promote your website. I've deleted your above post accordingly. If you do not abide by our guidelines you will be permanently banned.

mickal555
2006-Jan-22, 12:05 AM
What about tesla coils? they're cool :D
I tried to build one once...
I didn't get enough power though, must of pulled apart 100 TV's but I didn't find the right coil...

The Queensland University has a big magnet... One of the bigist in the world- I'd love to see it :D.

Thomas(believer)
2006-Jan-22, 12:40 AM
A few years ago I had a project at an aluminium smelter.
Aluminium is made by the process of electrolysis. In large halls of more then a kilometer long the furnaces are placed in line, through which currents flow in the order of 200,000A. When you work near the furnaces with an iron tool, you can feel the magnetic force. Awesome.

Lianachan
2006-Jan-22, 12:43 AM
A few years ago I had a project at an aluminium smelter.
Aluminium is made by the process of electrolysis. In large halls of more then a kilometer long the furnaces are placed in line, through which currents flow in the order of 200,000A. When you work near the furnaces with an iron tool, you can feel the magnetic force. Awesome.

When I was at school, we were taken on a tour of an aluminium smelter. I noticed that too. Extremely impressive.

sts60
2006-Jan-22, 01:56 AM
Is there no modern device that does not owe their rudimentry beginnings to one or more of Dr. Teslas prolific creative juices?

Spacecraft. Rockets. Lasers. Semiconductor devices of all kinds. Nuclear reactors. Pacemakers. Jet aircraft. Nanomachines. Gene sequencers. That's off the top of my head.

This man makes all other inventors look like striplings, he is the greatest mind that ever lent itself to the betterment of man.

Tesla truly was one of the great inventors of all time, a true genius. But to claim he makes Edison and da Vinci look "like striplings" indicates your enthusiasm is getting the better of you. To claim that he eclipses Newton, or Einstein, or, say, a number of great thinkers outside the realms of science and engineering, speaks to a lack of perspective. And the description of your comments to the Smithsonian indicates something else.

LurchGS
2006-Jan-22, 02:27 AM
add in radio remote control, the AND gate, the radio receiver (courts ruled against Marconi a few years ago), turbine pump.

He also won against Edison with regard to what form of current would run through our homes - Edison was enamored of DC (amazing that lightbulbs work better with AC...)

But I agree - there were other, greater thinkers. I'm not even going to try to name them.

sts60
2006-Jan-22, 02:51 AM
Well, my list was for things that did not "owe their rudimentary beginnings" to Tesla. There are many, many things like that; it doesn't take away from his reputation to say that.

Xipe Totec
2006-Jan-22, 02:58 AM
I stand by what I wrote, witout Tesla there would not be an Information Age for us to disseminate the pros and cons of Dr. Tesla.

Of course he had a different perspective and way of doing things, that's part of all great thinkers throughout the ages, and probably one reason he was so creative.

It sounds like most of you don't want to reclaim Dr. Tesla, it sounds like most of you want to convince ME I am wrong to view Dr. Tesla as a major contributor to todays society.

For the record, I really don't care what or how many negative anecdotes or weird stories about Dr. Tesla anyone dredges up, he is the greatest inventor ever been and probably ever to be. Besides, I've probably already read them all once or twice anyway.

Get back to me after you've read everything written about Dr. Tesla, then I won't feel like I'm shouting at the deaf.

:)

The key to understanding Tesla's career as the DaVinci of our era is in the savage warfare waged against his AC land line current scheme by hack inventor Thomas Edison. This disgusting bit of history gives us a clue as to how business was conducted in those days and why Tesla was unable to find funding after his Wardynclyffe tower project was sabotaged by J.P. Morgan when Morgan's workshop spies were unable to steal Tesla's blueprints cuz Tesla kept them all in his head, every thread pitch and pillow block dimension, it was that kind of head.

Claims that Tesla's later discoveries (made without benefit of a laboratory) were a bit potty, like the inventor, forget that every one of Tesla's inventions worked as advertised first time, zero prototyping. This track record should earn him and his later claims more respect. My pet conspiracy theory is that the Morgan Extended Trust Co., Cie., Ltd. dragged Einstein onto the stage to keep mainstream science from discovering that space is no vacuum (it is a stressed plenum), that EMF are compression wave phenomena, that free energy can be transduced from the Dirac Sea-Zero Point Energy Field-Scalar Potential, whatever you want to call it.

Tesla was a rare savant genius, there should be statues of him on every Main St. in the country. Instead he was written out of the history books. Mainstream physics is scared [Expletive deleted by moderator] over the implications of Tesla's work.

Xipe Totec

Wolverine
2006-Jan-22, 03:39 AM
Xipe Totec, please review and abide by our forum rules (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?p=564845#post564845). You are not allowed to swear here, as per the FAQ:

3. Language

No cursing. This goes along with being polite. This website is read by a lot of kids, including young school kids who want to learn about astronomy, space, and space exploration. The Universe is a marvelous place, full of beauty and wonder, and if you despoil it by using bad language you will quickly invoke the ire of the administrators and moderators. Think of the language used on TV during an after-school special and you'll get the idea. Deliberately misspelled bad words, or replacing key letters with different characters or numbers will not be tolerated. Same goes with adult topics -- talk about them somewhere else. If you do need to post something risqué, stick with arcane scientific terminology.

Archer17
2006-Jan-22, 03:44 AM
This is a strange thread..

Regarding Tesla, I believe most here think the way I do in that Tesla was ahead of his time in many ways and contributed to our advancement despite his eccentricities. His bio speaks for itself and doesn't require soapboxes.

Aside to terri tait: if you feel the need to promote someone or something, it should never be at the expense of others - whether it's "striplings" or your fellow posters.

Archer17
2006-Jan-22, 03:51 AM
..Mainstream physics is scared [snip] over the implications of Tesla's work..Why would they be "scared?"

GraniteBeach
2006-Jan-22, 04:20 AM
i have no choice but to deliberatly break your scientific rules, for the sake of nothing in particular. I think it is for me a chance to demonstrate to you the complete lack of concern i have for being 'permanently banned' from this extremely odd website. i believe in atlantis! http://ghostpopulace.atomspies.com isn't even my website. why would it have to be for me to read what's on it and recommend it? do you ban any of the people for posting links to Tesla biographys? No, but you are closed minded, so you come up with a bogus 'rule' reason to take off my link, which is: no linking your own site! make up that its mine, there you go. closed mind is an empty mind. closed soul is a vacant rush.

LurchGS
2006-Jan-22, 07:02 AM
why do I feel like I'm out in left field, all of a sudden?

Candy
2006-Jan-22, 07:55 AM
Who's on First? :shifty:

Dave Mitsky
2006-Jan-22, 02:12 PM
This has no bearing on Tesla's real achievements or his purported ones but I believe that hiss doctorate was an honorary one.

http://www.geocities.com/coogan23/tesla/teslachrono.html

Dave Mitsky

Wolverine
2006-Jan-23, 08:42 AM
i have no choice but to deliberatly break your scientific rules, for the sake of nothing in particular. I think it is for me a chance to demonstrate to you the complete lack of concern i have for being 'permanently banned' from this extremely odd website. i believe in atlantis! http://ghostpopulace.atomspies.com isn't even my website. why would it have to be for me to read what's on it and recommend it? do you ban any of the people for posting links to Tesla biographys? No, but you are closed minded, so you come up with a bogus 'rule' reason to take off my link, which is: no linking your own site! make up that its mine, there you go. closed mind is an empty mind. closed soul is a vacant rush.

If that website isn't yours, then I apologize for the hasty generalization. Regardless, there's still no need to post the same site repeatedly within the course of the same discussion. What possible relevance do ghost stories have in a discussion about Nikola Tesla?

In any case, you'll need to abide by our rules if you wish to continue posting here. The comments you've directed toward me, for example, are not within our civility & decorum guidelines.

Lianachan
2006-Jan-23, 09:33 AM
i have no choice but to deliberatly break your scientific rules, for the sake of nothing in particular. I think it is for me a chance to demonstrate to you the complete lack of concern i have for being 'permanently banned' from this extremely odd website. i believe in atlantis! http://ghostpopulace.atomspies.com isn't even my website. why would it have to be for me to read what's on it and recommend it? do you ban any of the people for posting links to Tesla biographys? No, but you are closed minded, so you come up with a bogus 'rule' reason to take off my link, which is: no linking your own site! make up that its mine, there you go. closed mind is an empty mind. closed soul is a vacant rush.

I think I know which side of the rope you'll be pulling, in the Tesla Tug Of War.

sts60
2006-Jan-23, 06:00 PM
The funny things is that everybody is kinda pulling on the same end of the rope. Everybody knows Tesla was a genius with long-lasting influence in many aspects of modern technology, most prominently the from of the electricity which powers the computer you're reading this on. But some people seem to insist, with a rather religious fervor, that you're dishonoring his memory if you don't instantly acknowledge that he could have whipped up on Newton, Einstein, and Edison together with one brain hemisphere tied behind his back, that he's responsible for every modern invention, and that a picture of Tesla on the wall in your home will give you fresher breath, whiter teeth, and good posture.

Lianachan
2006-Jan-23, 06:03 PM
The funny things is that everybody is kinda pulling on the same end of the rope. Everybody knows Tesla was a genius with long-lasting influence in many aspects of modern technology, most prominently the from of the electricity which powers the computer you're reading this on. But some people seem to insist, with a rather religious fervor, that you're dishonoring his memory if you don't instantly acknowledge that he could have whipped up on Newton, Einstein, and Edison together with one brain hemisphere tied behind his back, that he's responsible for every modern invention, and that a picture of Tesla on the wall in your home will give you fresher breath, whiter teeth, and good posture.
Countering that mentality is precisely what I meant by reclaiming the man in the first place. You're right, his near-God to woo-woo status really muddies the water even for some otherwise un-woo people.

JohnW
2006-Jan-23, 06:19 PM
But some people seem to insist, with a rather religious fervor, that you're dishonoring his memory if you don't instantly acknowledge that he could have whipped up on Newton, Einstein, and Edison together with one brain hemisphere tied behind his back, that he's responsible for every modern invention, and that a picture of Tesla on the wall in your home will give you fresher breath, whiter teeth, and good posture.
And that's what motivated my question on this thread a few days ago:

Can anyone recommend a good non-woowoo biography?
I was hoping to find a book which concentrated on the science, not on cult promotion. Sadly, it looks like the answer to my question is "No".

Sammy
2006-Jan-23, 06:25 PM
Countering that mentality is precisely what I meant by reclaiming the man in the first place. You're right, his near-God to woo-woo status really muddies the water even for some otherwise un-woo people.

Right on point for you and STS 60. I just can't figure out why the woo woo crowd has fixated so strongly on Tesla. On GLP, you can learn that Tesla coils can control the weather and/or cause earthquakes, and that he developed a car which could run by picking up broadcast power.

It may be a reflection of his mix of genius, what I consider to be a near-charlatan level of self promotion, and pursuit of impractical ideas (like broadcast power) which increasingly seperated him from mainstream science and business.

He was a tragic figure in life, and perhaps more so in death. I wish some good biographer, with some technical background, would research and write a good study of the man. It would make a great read and might help with the reclamation. He does deserve to be better remembered in mainstream history.

GraniteBeach
2006-Jan-30, 10:03 PM
you guys have your heads way up your own backsides with this 'woo-woo' stuff. you really all think you're great, don't you? anyone who thinks they are so much better that you call people who disagree 'woo' and yourselves 'non-woo' pretty much is worth a pile of pig vomit. you can all have my 'resignation' from this board, i just got on it to pester you filth. and i don't have the patience to try any more.

Doodler
2006-Jan-30, 10:10 PM
you guys have your heads way up your own backsides with this 'woo-woo' stuff. you really all think you're great, don't you? anyone who thinks they are so much better that you call people who disagree 'woo' and yourselves 'non-woo' pretty much is worth a pile of pig vomit. you can all have my 'resignation' from this board, i just got on it to pester you filth. and i don't have the patience to try any more.

:boohoo:

The concept behind the tag woo-woo is pretty well defined here, so there's no mystery behind why so much of what drags Tesla's name through the muck is almost immediately painted with the name.

Wolverine
2006-Jan-30, 10:34 PM
you guys have your heads way up your own backsides with this 'woo-woo' stuff. you really all think you're great, don't you? anyone who thinks they are so much better that you call people who disagree 'woo' and yourselves 'non-woo' pretty much is worth a pile of pig vomit. you can all have my 'resignation' from this board, i just got on it to pester you filth. and i don't have the patience to try any more.

Needless to say (and despite the prior warning), this sort of behavior is not tolerated here. Account terminated.

ToSeek
2006-Jan-30, 10:38 PM
you can all have my 'resignation' from this board

Resignation accepted.

EvilBob
2006-Jan-30, 11:30 PM
And that's what motivated my question on this thread a few days ago:

I was hoping to find a book which concentrated on the science, not on cult promotion. Sadly, it looks like the answer to my question is "No".

I have a copy at home of The Man Who Invented the Twentieth Century (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0747275882/qid=1138663699/sr=1-9/ref=sr_1_9/002-3755226-0428843?s=books&v=glance&n=283155) which, while not being a particularly well-written bio, doesn't focus on too much of the weird stuff. It does describe his increasing oddity towards the end of his career, though. It's not bad.

Doodler
2006-Jan-31, 12:25 AM
I have a copy at home of The Man Who Invented the Twentieth Century (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0747275882/qid=1138663699/sr=1-9/ref=sr_1_9/002-3755226-0428843?s=books&v=glance&n=283155) which, while not being a particularly well-written bio, doesn't focus on too much of the weird stuff. It does describe his increasing oddity towards the end of his career, though. It's not bad.

Unfortunately, someone so noted for oddity is going to be difficult to feather out from his real innovations. Almost the same fate that's become Howard Hughes' legacy.

You take the good with the bad, and you do your own salad picking from time to time.

Sammy
2006-Jan-31, 01:41 AM
Did you note on the Amazon link two of the books that people who bought the Tesla bio also bought?

Sigh!

Turning the Hiram Key : Rituals of Freemasonry Revealed (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1592331343/ref=pd_sim_b_2/103-4128735-8762255?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance) by Robert Lomas (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/ref=pd_sim_b_2/103-4128735-8762255?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books&field-author=Robert%20Lomas)

The Lost Journals of Nikola Tesla : Haarp - Chemtrails and Secret of Alternative 4 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1892062135/ref=pd_sim_b_4/103-4128735-8762255?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance) by Tim Swartz (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/ref=pd_sim_b_4/103-4128735-8762255?%5Fencoding=UTF8&search-type=ss&index=books&field-author=Tim%20Swartz)