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Glom
2006-Jan-24, 06:08 PM
I have a meteorological research satellite I want to launch into a low high inclination orbit. Where's the best place to pick rockets to do this?

Nicolas
2006-Jan-24, 06:14 PM
What size? (I believe you've got an 8, right? :D)


You have finished the satellite and now you're shopping for a launcher. That might cause some nasty problems. BEtter to do this before you finish your satellite design.


Edit: oh you mean where's the best place to launch a rocket, not to order one? :D :D :D

Glom
2006-Jan-24, 07:10 PM
I haven't finished designing it. We've only just begun. That's why I need to know where to buy one now.

Cugel
2006-Jan-25, 12:08 AM
Probably the cheapest thing that will get you to orbit is the Russian Volna.
It costs something like $4,000,000 and is launched from a submarine. The Planetary society used it for their solar sale mission and the rocket almost got it to the next ocean. Maybe that lowered the price tag even further.

Nicolas
2006-Jan-25, 12:37 AM
Those Volna missiles tend to have some problems from time to time indeed. Cheap full blown rockets I know of are the air launched Pegasus, and the Russian Soyuz. Piggybacking inside an Ariane5 can be cheap, certainly if it's a University microsatellite (those are free sometimes, though I don't think particulars ever get to ride their microsatellite for free).

But it all depends on the mass, size, intended orbit, launcher facilities needed, launch requirements Re acoustic loading, G loading....

Cugel
2006-Jan-25, 01:07 PM
Maybe he should call Elon Musk and volunteer as experimental payload on the next Falcon 1. (I mean his satellite, not 777geek himself of course)

Robert Andersson
2006-Jan-25, 02:13 PM
There was talk about that the swedish space agency would offer launches of microsatellites as missile payload from fighter aircrafts. Interresting idea, don't know if it ever took off.

NEOWatcher
2006-Jan-25, 02:18 PM
... don't know if it ever took off.
Ba-dump-bump. http://www.cosgan.de/images/smilie/musik/a035.gif

Nicolas
2006-Jan-25, 02:26 PM
There was talk about that the swedish space agency would offer launches of microsatellites as missile payload from fighter aircrafts. Interresting idea, don't know if it ever took off.

I'm unaware of fighter missiles that can reach orbit :confused:

Robert Andersson
2006-Jan-25, 02:54 PM
I'm unaware of fighter missiles that can reach orbit :confused:
It would probably be some special rocket, using the aircraft as sortof first-stage. I heard about it 1-2 years ago, proposing using the now retired Viggen fighter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saab_Viggen), capabable of Mach 2+ and climbing to ~20 km altitude.

Halcyon Dayz
2006-Jan-26, 11:04 PM
I'm unaware of fighter missiles that can reach orbit :confused:
ASAT (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-satellite_weapon) Anti-Satelite System

From 1977 Vought developed an ASAT to attack satellites in LEO, the three stage missile was fired by an F-15 in a steep climb and carried a miniature homing vehicle (MHV) to track and then destroy the target kinetically. The first test was in 1983 and the first successful interception, of the defunct US satellite P78 SolWind, was on September 13, 1985.
SolWind (http://www.astronautix.com/craft/solwind.htm) was actually still operational.
Some sort of bureaucratic screw-up.
The astronomers were of course livid.

Oh, and there is the Pegasus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pegasus_rocket), which is launch by a civilian aircraft.

The vehicle is capable of placing small payloads into low altitude orbits. The first successful Pegasus launch occurred on April 5, 1990. A Pegasus XL, introduced in 1994 with lengthened stages, provides increased payload. The standard Pegasus has been discontinued; the Pegasus XL is still being produced. Pegasus has flown 36 missions (in both configurations) as of summer 2005. Of these, 33 were considered successful launches.

Jerry
2006-Jan-30, 02:05 AM
I have a meteorological research satellite I want to launch into a low high inclination orbit. Where's the best place to pick rockets to do this?
ATK.com