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sacrelicious
2003-Feb-25, 12:34 AM
not much astronomy in this movie, but I did pick out one thing (more ergonomics than astronomy, but it still counts cause it deals with space):

when the astronauts are sent into space, they are wearing suits and ties. I submit to you that such a wardrobe is miles away from being the ideal dress code for micro gravity, and that the only outfit that could possibly be worse would be ballgowns complete with hoop skirts!

not only would the tie have an altogether annoying tendency toward getting in your way, but the various flaps of the sportcoat would also be floating everywhere. the sportcaot would also ride up the shoulders so that the collar reaches the ears. the result would be a much diminished periheral vision, and (should the coat be buttoned) a dangerous chance of being brought down around the upper arms (for those of you that arent fans of old detective movies, a coat pulled down in such a way restricts the movement of both arms dramatically, so that thugs are unable to fight back against Bogart as he calmly relieves them of their two pistols [see Maltese Falcon]).

such a mode of dress can only be the result of fashion gone mad with power, yet when you consider the sheer ugliness of a suit in zero-G (and don't forget that the pants are going to bunch up, revealing socks and legs of a near phosphorecent whiteness), surely it's poor policy even on that front.



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: sacrelicious on 2003-02-24 19:35 ]</font>

Timm
2003-Feb-25, 01:09 AM
I guess they used the suit&tie in the ship to show how advanced the technology is and how elite the people going to space are. So it's probably just a matter of style and was never supposed to be very realistic and/or scientific.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Timm on 2003-02-24 20:10 ]</font>

sacrelicious
2003-Feb-25, 01:17 AM
On 2003-02-24 20:09, Timm wrote:
I guess they used the suit&tie in the ship to show how advanced the technology is and how elite the people going to space are. So it's probably just a matter of style and was never supposed to be very realistic and/or scientific.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Timm on 2003-02-24 20:10 ]</font>


thanks, killjoy /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

g99
2003-Feb-25, 01:38 AM
That movie is one of my most favorite movies. Great acting and stroy. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif


Another bad astronomy: For the amount of people in the ship, it was way too small to supply them for a long duration stay. Let alone hold the fuel for a trip around the solar system and back. It looked just barely big enougth to hold them.
Good:
Altought the requirements for being a astronaut were good. Also the whole very intricate process of chartting a course. Not just point and go. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

tracer
2003-Feb-25, 02:36 AM
Although you have to wonder about a company whose only two products are DNA testing and space launches. That's an awfully weird combo.

sacrelicious
2003-Feb-25, 03:45 AM
On 2003-02-24 20:38, g99 wrote:
That movie is one of my most favorite movies. Great acting and stroy. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif




I thought it was okay. the plot was great, and the visual style was excellent, it just had one fatal flaw: it was just too cold. now I hate overly melodramatic movies as much as the next guy (well, more to be totally frank), but there was hardly a trace of any kind of emotion or emotional overtones, which seemed glaringly opposed to how one imagines people would behave in such circumstances. you would think there would be some humor (gallows humor, or the oblivious laughter of the decadent) or passion in the lives of the people, and most especially passion in the protagonist, who went to extrodinary lengths to achieve his lifelong dream. instead everyone seemed like a relative they didn't know very well just died: solemn, but of the practiced variety that is adopted just so you don't seem insensitive.

a great candidate for a remake in twenty or thirty years, if you ask me.

honestmonkey
2003-Feb-25, 05:50 PM
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the shuttle they took into orbit was taking them to a space-station where they would continue their journey. It wasn't the ship that they were going to take to Jupiter (or wherever).

I liked the movie a lot as well, and didn't mind that the "going into space" portion was a bit odd.

kilopi
2003-Feb-25, 05:54 PM
On 2003-02-25 12:50, honestmonkey wrote:
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the shuttle they took into orbit was taking them to a space-station where they would continue their journey. It wasn't the ship that they were going to take to Jupiter (or wherever).
Yeah, they were commuting, so of course they wore their suits.

<font size=-1>[ Changed were to wore ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: kilopi on 2003-02-26 10:39 ]</font>

gethen
2003-Feb-26, 03:30 PM
I really enjoyed that movie too. But, on the basis of space wardrobe, I cannot watch Enterprize with any enthusiasm since the episode where the Enterprize rescued a female alien ambassador from kidnappers. The "ambassador" was wearing a filmy dress and HIGH HEELS. Paralell evolution to the contrary, it beggars belief that two civilizations would have evolved simultaneously who thought 3 inch stilettos were acceptable wear for diplomats. (or anyone else, for that matter.)

kilopi
2003-Feb-26, 03:45 PM
So, let me get this straight. You lost your enthusiasm when the ambassador wore a flimsy dress? Excuse me, filmy dress. Anyway, if the ambassador had calves, then high heels might be a logical parallel development--they not only make someone appear taller (often viewed as a psychological advantage, even in quadrapeds), it accentuates the calf. Everyone appreciates a good calf (http://www.veal.org/), right?

daver
2003-Feb-26, 05:26 PM
On 2003-02-26 10:45, kilopi wrote:
good calf (http://www.veal.org/), right?


Moses didn't. Oh, excuse me. You said a GOOD calf. Never mind.

tracer
2003-Feb-26, 08:08 PM
On 2003-02-26 10:30, gethen wrote:
Paralell evolution to the contrary, it beggars belief that two civilizations would have evolved simultaneously who thought 3 inch stilettos were acceptable wear for diplomats. (or anyone else, for that matter.)

Heck, it beggars belief that two species that evolved on different planets -- even if their physiological appearance was being manipulated by a 4 billion year old genetic program -- would have behaviors and expectations that are so similar to each other.

For example:

Have you ever seen a Star Trek alien species that didn't pair-bond with its mates? Pair-bonding with ones mate is a rarity even among sexually-reproducing species here on Earth. Humans are one of the few exceptions to the rule. And yet, every single humanoid alien species on Star Trek pair-bonds with its mates. (Some of them will even pair-bond with human mates, as bestial as that sounds.)

gethen
2003-Feb-28, 05:50 PM
Kilopi it wasn't the dress so much as the shoes. Bad shoes. And I hate veal.

calliarcale
2003-Mar-03, 10:53 PM
On 2003-02-26 15:08, tracer wrote:
Pair-bonding with ones mate is a rarity even among sexually-reproducing species here on Earth. Humans are one of the few exceptions to the rule.

Well, actually there are a lot of animals that *do* mate for life. (And many of those animals appear to have the same kinds of marital problems as humans, albeit in a rather different context. Some will cheat, and some will even prostitute themselves.) Birds in particular will do this. Albatross spend most of their lives isolated, wandering the globe, but they always return to the same spot to mate with the same bird of the opposite gender that they mated with the previous year. They share chick-raising duties too. Any North American bird-watcher will tell you how romantic cardinals are; the male and female in a pair will spend their lives together and almost never go out of one another's sight. Usually if you see one, that means that his or her mate is within thirty feet. All species of loon will mate for life, and so will many ducks. Canadian geese congregate in large flocks, but they also mate for life -- they may all look the same to you or me, but they know their mates and will breed with no others. Many raptors mate for life, and can become very depressed if they are separated from their beloved.

It sometimes does look as though humans are the only animals that mate for life, but that's probably mostly because for most of us, our experience with other animals is mostly limited to herd animals, pack animals, and solitary predators (cattle, horses, dogs, cats). And let's face it; most animals probably aren't inclined to invite humans to their wedding receptions. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

Krel
2003-Mar-04, 03:22 AM
One thing that I learned from "Gataca" is that in the future people will drive Stutabaker Avantis. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

I really like the film, I think that they may have been going for a 1960s European sf look. The interesting thing is that the only people to really accomplish things in the movie are those that had not been genetically enhanced. They were the driven ones.

David.