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Sticks
2006-Feb-13, 04:58 PM
Carried over from this thread (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?p=680335)

Anyone remember that series Salvage One? (http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Launchpad/9782/salvage1.html)

I was thinking about the space craft they used in the series, The Vulture (http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Launchpad/9782/salvulture.html). Could such a craft work in real life?

Is there such a substance as mono-hydrazine, or was that a fictional fuel invented for the show?

Somehow the lack of such craft today makes me think the show took a lot of liberties. :think:

Nowhere Man
2006-Feb-13, 05:20 PM
Ow, my brain! Yeah, I remember that show.

I don't know enough about the physics of the job, but my gut feeling is that such a ship is not possible with what we currently know. Probably not possible ever.

Mono-hydrazine is definitely fictional.

I think the phrase "a lot of liberties" is a gross understatement :think:.

Fred

Sticks
2006-Feb-13, 05:30 PM
Mono-hydrazine is definitely fictional.


Is there any substance that comes close to the properties of that compund ?

Halcyon Dayz
2006-Feb-13, 05:37 PM
Is there any substance that comes close to the properties of that compound ?
Nitroglycerin springs to mind.

Nowhere Man
2006-Feb-13, 06:12 PM
I dunno about that. The show demonstrated the MH was not only highly explosive (one drop lofted an old engine block) but could also be controlled for extended burns (the same amount had a model rocket hovering for a number of seconds).

Fred

NEOWatcher
2006-Feb-13, 08:56 PM
I dunno about that. The show demonstrated the MH was not only highly explosive (one drop lofted an old engine block) but could also be controlled for extended burns (the same amount had a model rocket hovering for a number of seconds).

Fred
I don't think "burn" is so accurate. They tested thier rocket while being "anchored" to the ground for minutes at a time without burning up thier junkyard.
I just remember that scene at the race track where they showed slow accelaration/decelaration was more fuel efficient.
First, the faster you can accelarate, the sooner you are out of atmospheric drag (and other stuff that I can't explain)
Second, how much fuel did it take apollo to slow down from translunar speeds. http://www.cosgan.de/images/smilie/verschiedene/n045.gif