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Dunash
2002-Jan-10, 12:21 AM
This posting spotted on another site is worthy of discussion.

http://disc.server.com/discussion.cgi?id=13682&article=876

Happy Holidays to one and all!

Well, as Science goes, I have good news and bad news (which news is which depends, of course, on one's
point of view). After a year-end perusal through the e-print archives, a few very interesting papers have come to
my attention that may also be of interest to the participants in this Forum.

First up is a paper by M. R. S. Hawkins on the absence of time-dilation in the redshifted light from quasars.
(See, "Time Dilation and Quasar Variability," astro-ph/0105073). Now one may recall that evidence of
time-dilation in the redshifted light curves of supernovae explosions has been offered in support of the Big Bang
Theory. Yet would we not also expect to see evidence of time-dilation in the emitted light from quasars, if in fact
they are also carried along by the same theoretical spatial expansion? Thus, it would seem the absence of such
time-dilation in the redshifted quasar light-spectrum is evidence against the spatial-expansion hypothesis and
raises questions about the viability of that hypothesis to explain the time-dilation in the supernovae light-spectra
as well -- since it is not possible to have the one without the other. (See also Hawkins', Quasar Variability:
Correlations with Amplitude," astro-ph/0002368).

Next up are a couple of papers (actually one paper in two parts) by M. B. Bell (see, "On QSO Distances and
Lifetimes in a Local Model," astro-ph/0112045 and "Further Evidence for Large Intrinsic Redshifts,"
astro-ph/0111123). He has tested Halton Arp's hypothesis that quasars are ejected from AGN's. By studying
the 14 quasars which surround NGC 1068 (which is a Seyfert galaxy; each of which is an AGN) he confirms
that the Arp hypothesis is viable. One may recall from past discussions that Halton Arp proposes
that a matter "anomaly" is created in Seyfert galaxies and ejected as quasars of high redshift and low luminosity.
As the matter-creation process continues, the quasars evolve into galaxies of lower redshift and higher
luminosity (see Arp's book, "Seeing Red" for details). The Bell study of the vicinity of NGC 1068 shows that
the quasars in the region of space near this Seyfert galaxy conform to the pattern of ejection and redshift
evolution proposed by Halton Arp. This result also lends support to Arp's notion that quasar redshifts are
largely intrinsic due to the lower electron-mass of the quasar's constituent matter as it undergoes the matter
formation process. That is, if the quasar's spectral redshift is indeed intrinsic, it suggests the quasar is composed
of constituent atoms of lower-mass (atomic weight) when compared to the corresponding atoms in the Earth
frame of reference -- which, again, is a central tenet of the ongoing-matter-creation hypothesis. These papers
seem to take a middle road between the expanding-space hypothesis of the standard Big Bang Theory and the
"oscillating" universe theory of Halton Arp's (et al.) Quasi-Steady State Theory. Who knows --perhaps one day
there will be a realization of the theory that space is quasi-static and matter is formed from, and expands within,
it -- wouldn't that be
news!

Another interesting development (or lack thereof) is in the continued search for the Higgs particle. This massive
particle, thought to compose the "Dirac sea" (see M. Consoli, "Newtonian Gravity from the Higgs Field: The
Sublimation of Aether," hep-ph/0109215) and to be responsible for the existence of mass itself, is a staple of
the Standard Model of particle physics and not finding evidence of its existence at the energies at which it is
supposed to exist is shaking-up the physics community. If the Higgs particle does not exist, then the Standard
Model would need serious revision (not to mention those aether models which propose the Higgs as comprising
the Aether). But as always when contrary developments arise, people are taking a "wait-and-see" approach.

And last but not least, we are awaiting the release of the quasar lists from the SDSS catalogue; but we find that,
due to several changes in the algorithms used to determine the spectral redshifts, preliminary lists of some 3,000
quasars are not suitable for statistical analysis (see, "The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog I. Early Data
Release," astro-ph/0110629 for details). Pity, since these quasar lists will form the basis for either a verification
or falsification of the redshift periodicities reported by Tifft, Burbidge, Napier, et al. that would essentially doom
the standard Big Bang Theory should these periodicities prove to exist. But it appears that a suitable listing of
some 20,000 quasars will be available in December 2002.

So we will see what good news the new year will bring.

jkmccrann
2005-Nov-17, 05:00 PM
This posting spotted on another site is worthy of discussion.

Another interesting development (or lack thereof) is in the continued search for the Higgs particle. This massive
particle, thought to compose the "Dirac sea" (see M. Consoli, "Newtonian Gravity from the Higgs Field: The
Sublimation of Aether," hep-ph/0109215) and to be responsible for the existence of mass itself, is a staple of
the Standard Model of particle physics and not finding evidence of its existence at the energies at which it is
supposed to exist is shaking-up the physics community. If the Higgs particle does not exist, then the Standard
Model would need serious revision (not to mention those aether models which propose the Higgs as comprising
the Aether). But as always when contrary developments arise, people are taking a "wait-and-see" approach.



Does anyone here know if they've actually identified the Higgs particle as yet? And what that means for Quantum Physics and the theories it brings to the table for the explanation of everything?

Cougar
2005-Nov-17, 06:40 PM
First up is a paper by M. R. S. Hawkins on the absence of time-dilation in the redshifted light from quasars.
(See, "Time Dilation and Quasar Variability," astro-ph/0105073). Now one may recall that evidence of
time-dilation in the redshifted light curves of supernovae explosions has been offered in support of the Big Bang
Theory. Yet would we not also expect to see evidence of time-dilation in the emitted light from quasars, if in fact
they are also carried along by the same theoretical spatial expansion? Thus, it would seem the absence of such
time-dilation in the redshifted quasar light-spectrum is evidence against the spatial-expansion hypothesis and
raises questions about the viability of that hypothesis to explain the time-dilation in the supernovae light-spectra
as well -- since it is not possible to have the one without the other.
Hawkins' paper has been discussed somewhat extensively on this board. Supernova Ia's are all produced by the same mechanism, and their light curves and peak luminosities are all very, very similar, hence their great potential as standard candles. Quasars, on the other hand, have wildly differing variabilities, from hours or days to months or years, so one cannot separate the effect of time dilation from the quasar's intrinsic variability.
So Hawkins did a statistical analysis and figured if the standard view is correct, the more distant quasars should, on average, show longer variations in their luminosities. His statistical analysis didn't show what was expected. There could be many reasons for this. A lack of actual time dilation is at the bottom of the list, if it is on the list at all.

VanderL
2005-Nov-17, 07:23 PM
His statistical analysis didn't show what was expected. There could be many reasons for this. A lack of actual time dilation is at the bottom of the list, if it is on the list at all.

Cougar, you should add to your comment that it is your personal view, this is what Hawkins says:


TIME DILATION AND May QUASAR VARIABILITY
M. R. S. Hawkins
University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ, Scotland, UK mrsh@roe.ac.uk
ABSTRACT
The timescale of quasar variability is widely expected to show the effects of time dilation. In this paper we analyse the Fourier power spectra of a large sample of quasar light curves to look for such an effect. We find that the timescale of quasar variation does not increase with redshift as required by time dilation. Possible explanations of this result all conflict with widely held
consensus in the scientific community.

Could you tell us what these "many reasons" are? What is wrong with his approach?

Cheers.

akirabakabaka
2005-Nov-17, 11:03 PM
Why does jkmccrann keep resurrecting several-year-old threads that are already being discussed elsewhere?