PDA

View Full Version : Arabsat4A launched



Blob
2006-Feb-28, 10:59 PM
A Proton-M launch vehicle has launched the Arabsat 4A communications satellite from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on February 28 at 20:10 p.m. GMT (2:10 a.m. on 1 March Baikonur time)
Arabsat 4A is the first of two spacecraft built by EADS Astrium for Arabsat, the communications satellite operator based in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

http://static.flickr.com/54/105957246_5cf5e04779_m.jpg
Expand (http://static.flickr.com/54/105957246_5cf5e04779_o.jpg)
A perfect launch!
Credit ILS

Confirmation of Spacecraft separation will happen approximately at 00:00 GMT

Fr. Wayne
2006-Feb-28, 11:36 PM
Bon voyage and best wishes to the Saudis.

Blob
2006-Mar-01, 12:43 AM
The launch of the ARABSAT 4A has failed due to the upper stage rocket motor.

ILS statement:

"Khrunichev and International Launch Services regret to announce the failure of the Proton launch vehicle to put the ARABSAT 4A satellite into proper orbit for EADS Astrium and ARABSAT.
The Proton Breeze M rocket lifted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome at 2:10 a.m. today local time (3:10 p.m. Tuesday EST, 20:10 Tuesday GMT). Preliminary flight information indicates that the Breeze M upper stage shut down early during its planned burn sequence. As a contingency, the satellite was separated. We cannot comment on the disposition of the spacecraft at this time.
A Russian State Commission is being formed to determine the reasons for the anomaly. In parallel with the State Commission, ILS will form its own Failure Review Oversight Board to review reasons for the anomaly and define a corrective action plan. ILS will release additional information when it becomes available.
ILS remains committed to providing reliable, timely launch services for all its customers. To this end, ILS will work diligently with its partner Khrunichev to return Proton to flight as soon as possible."

Fr. Wayne
2006-Mar-01, 01:42 AM
Ok, so it's all my fault again. Me and my big mouth.

Blob
2006-Mar-01, 10:30 AM
Hum,
i don`t think so; the three lower stages of the Proton had completed their firings and separated as planned during the first 10 minutes of the flight.
The Khrunichev-built Breeze M upper stage's main engine then ignited a few moments later to ascend into a 108-mile-high parking orbit. ILS reported that the burn had occurred as scheduled, ending at T plus 14 minutes, 45 seconds.

It was during one of the three more engine firings that were planned by the Breeze M and attached satellite payload over the next three-and-a-half hours to propel the 7,366-pound satellite to geosynchronous transfer that the failure occurred.
Exactly when, isn't clear at the moment. Preliminary flight information indicates that the Breeze M upper stage shut down early during its planned burn sequence. As a contingency, the satellite was separated. ILS did not comment on the disposition of the spacecraft at this time.

"The satellite was not put into the proper orbit due to a malfunction on the Briz-M booster" - spokesman, Federal Space Agency.

ToSeek
2006-Mar-07, 05:49 PM
Round-the-Moon rescue? (http://msnbc.msn.com/id/11594666/#060301d)


What can you do with a satellite in a useless orbit? That's the question now facing the folks who built, launched and hoped to use the Arabsat 4A telecommunications satellite — and one of the potential answers could involve an unorthodox trip all the way around the moon to get the orbit back in sync.

Argos
2006-Mar-07, 05:56 PM
And the Saudis would belong in the Lunar Club. That´s something.

Fr. Wayne
2006-Mar-08, 01:47 PM
I will now try to break my jinx by wishing all the best to Spain. http://www.spaceflightnow.com/ariane/v170/status.html

Blob
2007-Feb-22, 01:46 PM
On Feb. 19, 2007, the Briz-M upper stage and the satellite, for some unknown reason, brokeup as the pair orbited over Australia.
Today NORAD has added 1111 fragments from the break-up of the Briz-M and Arabsat-4A satellite.

BREEZE-M R/B
Period 274.13
Incl. 51.52
Apogee 14706
Perigee 495

TLE Data


BREEZE-M R/B
1 28944U 06006B 07051.71281544 .00000106 00000-0 15456-3 0 1986
2 28944 051.5172 212.2509 5083362 198.4402 133.0779 05.25304411 18752

Blob
2007-Feb-26, 11:00 PM
The explosion of a Russian rocket stage in space may have created as much debris, if not more, as the destruction of a satellite by China last month.
The rocket section - which contained fuel - exploded on 19 February, generating 1,111 pieces of debris which could threaten other spacecraft.
This space wreckage could remain in orbit for years, experts say.

Read more (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6398513.stm)