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View Full Version : the sand of mars quite same as earth's red sand



suntrack2
2006-Mar-02, 05:11 PM
normally we observe that sand founds nearby the sea shore or in the river basin, so is there a possibility on mars that river and sea both were there. and the type of sand on mars is much likely see as our red sand. so do you think that there is a similierity in both types of sand. or mars sand is different one, throught color of mars appears red mostly, so only sand is there or besides sand the clay is also red one mostly !

was there a great possibility on mars about a red water sea? the tycoons on mars are responsible to carry lot of sand from here to there on the surface.
when the sand carries by the winds on mars on the surface then may be the surface temperature of mars is more hot and due to only sand coating and in the evening the mars surface may become cooler earlier, since the sand has the property " early to hot and early to cool."

are there any specific studies on this issue.

sunil

01101001
2006-Mar-02, 09:18 PM
Well, in the places visited by MER, olivine seems to be a part of the sand, and since it is readily transformed by water, you're not likely to find much in most Earth sand.

They've made many measurements of Martian regolith and I know they've also found pyroxene, ferric oxides, basalt. I'm not a geologist so I can't compare that to Earth sands. Google will no doubt lead you to plenty of analyses of Martian sand.

I know they found different colors, not just red. Olivine, for instance, is greenish. Sands from the salts both rovers have encountered are bound to be mostly whitish.


was there a great possibility on mars about a red water sea? the tycoons on mars are responsible to carry lot of sand from here to there on the surface.
I'm not sure what you're asking. Evidence at Meridiani and Gusev indicate perhaps a shallow sea. I don't imagine the water would be particualrly red. I've seen Earth lakes in regions of heavy iron concentrations and they were as clear as most others. They might get a hint of red if they are turbid and iron-rich minerals are temporarily suspended in the water. There aren't typhoons on Mars now. There are fast but weak winds and dust devils.

aurora
2006-Mar-03, 06:05 PM
normally we observe that sand founds nearby the sea shore or in the river basin, so is there a possibility on mars that river and sea both were there. and the type of sand on mars is much likely see as our red sand.

Note that sand can also be formed by wind.

So finding sand does not by itself prove that there was water there at one time.

You might want to read up on the current Mars rovers missions and what the rovers Spirit and Opportunity have found so far.

Huevos Grandes
2006-Mar-03, 06:17 PM
There has been numerous work around the theory that Mars once had liquid oceans, and the subterranean river/ocean theory still holds a small minority of scientific opinion.

Where is your evidence for similarity for the similarity to Earth-based "clay" sand ? Did NASA/ESA/JAXA conduct a sample-return mission and confirm such a fact while I was sleeping ?? :eh:

Romanus
2006-Mar-04, 02:12 AM
Actually, I have heard that Martian "sand" is probably not much like terrestrial sand. Much terrestrial sand has been ultimately eroded from silicic rocks like granite and andesite, and well-sorted by wind and water to a high degree. Most of Mars's dust has probably come from silica-poor basalts. Here's something from a old article about the Viking results, that I think should still be relevant:

Excerpt:
"The Martian soil does not, however, contain the kind of sand found on the earth. Most terrestrial sand sand consists of quartz and feldspar minerals that have been weathered from acidic igneous and metamorphic rocks...Mars has not differentiated to the extent that acidic rocks have been created in large quantities; the planet is probably dominated by mafic basalts. In such basalts the major minerals are olivine, pyroxene and plagioclase feldspar. Huguenin has shown that even in the cold, arid environment of Mars these minerals are rapidly weathered by ultraviolet-stimulated oxidation.

"If, as is suspected, the bright soil at the landing sites is made up of clay minerals, the soil would be very fine-grained. Particles the size of grains of sands could exist, however, as aggregates of smaller particles."

Murry, Bruce, ed. "Scientific American: The Planets". (San Francisco: W.H. Freeman and Company, 1983), Raymond E. Arvidson, Alan B. Binder and Kenneth L. Jones. "The Surface of Mars", pp. 48-59.

suntrack2
2006-Mar-04, 09:40 AM
Romanus you are quite right, the basalt like stone and its granuels are spread all over the surface of the mars, in some pieces, ( as the picture seen from the nasa photos), the cutting age stones etc. are indicating that there is much resemblence with the basalt like stones on earth too.

Huevos, i have not touched the mars's surface.but whatever the photo seen published by the nasa, so i have fetched the conclusion only, i am not sure though. aurora, you are telling that wind is also responsible for making sand, well i am partially agree, but wind do the function of available sand in the stones layers, in the holes, on the picks of mountains, in the dry basin,

it (wind) carries with its pressure and speed towards the different destination. but basically the procedure of making sand is purely water born. when water works like a knife for the stones in the basin, the granuels become extracted in the bottom of the water and later when there is a dry basin, the same sand carries with wind. only wind is not responsible to make sand from the stones. there are many other reasons also.

sunil

suntrack2
2006-Mar-04, 10:36 AM
tried to find out exact comparison between earth's red sand and mars red sand, but I don't found any links.


but some interesting information i found in some sites. the list is given in the attachment.

http://mpfwww.jpl.nasa.gov/science/mineralogy.html

http://www.artchaeology.com/Terraforming%20and%20Landscape%20Architecture.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_(planet)

http://www.exo.net/~pauld/Mars/marsexplorations.html

http://www.jamesoberg.com/1984terraseti_ter.html

suntrack2
2006-Mar-04, 04:52 PM
is iron oxide ample on the mars? in that case earth is also having ample iron oxide on its surface.
i would like to know more about iron oxide on mars.

about iron oxide i found one page on wikipedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_oxide