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Launch window
2006-Mar-04, 07:08 PM
Corot will be the first mission capable of detecting rocky planets. This mission is not 100% certain yet, and is not totally guaranteed, plus ESA do have mishaps or sometimes get their budget cut. However the recent trend from European exploration with great results from Mars Express, Cluster, Rosetta, Xmm-Newton and Venus Express would suggest ESA is on a roll of success lately.
This Corot exoplanet mission will use its telescope to monitor closely the changes in a star’s brightness that comes from a planet crossing in front of it. In each field of view there will be one main target star for the asteroseismology as well as up to nine other targets. Simultaneously, it will be recording the brightness of 12,000 stars brighter than apparent magnitude 15.5 for the exo-planet study. The COROT project will contribute to the search for habitable, Earth-like planets around other stars.

The mission was first started by the French back in 1996, and later the European members of ESA joined the mission, the Russians will help launch it by Soyuz-Fregat at Baikonur

The corot handbook
http://corotsol.obspm.fr/web-instrum/payload.param/

Corot overview
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/120372_index_3_m.html

the Video
http://corot.oamp.fr/renduhr.avi

Beginning of the COROT satellite validation/integration phase, on 6 January 2006
http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/GP_actualite.htm

The Corot mission wasn't intended to be as ground breaking or massive as NASA's TPF, but was much more like the Kepler project, Corot just like the Kepler mission will use "transit" method to detect these planets.
Exact launch date is yet to be determined, but everything seems 'go' for October of this year 2006.

Launch window
2006-Mar-04, 07:37 PM
the ESA do have a much bigger mission planned called Darwin, this is their version of NASA's TPF. http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/02/0207_030207_etsearch.html
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3741674/
European space agency's Darwin like the TerrestrialPlanetFinder project, will use a flotilla of space telescopes flying in formation to look for life on alien Earthlike planets, unfortunately recent funding for NASA's TPF-project has been cut. However because TPF and Darwin were so similar in their design and goals, a collaborative project between NASA-ESA had always seemed possible.

Kullat Nunu
2006-Mar-04, 07:59 PM
Thanks for the links, it's nice to see how it is going...

Launch window
2006-Mar-06, 11:40 PM
COROT, is an important stepping stone in the European effort to find habitable, Earth-like planets around other stars. ESA joined the mission in October 2000 by agreeing to provide the optics for the telescope and test the payload at its European Space Research and Technology Centre in the Netherlands. COROT (COnvection ROtation and planetary Transits) is a mission led by the French National Space Agency, CNES. It is a 30-centimetre diameter space telescope designed to detect tiny changes in brightness from nearby stars. Launch is scheduled this year from Russia - occultation method searches for planetary transits when the planet passes in front of its parent star. The main pertinent parameters are:
1. The luminosity drop eta of the star :
eta = (RPl/R*)2
2. The geometric probability p of occultations
p = R*/a
3. The duration D of the transit
D = (P/pi).(R*/a)
where a is the orbital distance to the star and P the orbital period of the planet.
COROT will also be used to detect subtle brightness changes caused by sound waves that resonate through the star. These create a 'starquake' that sends ripples across the star's surface, altering its brightness.
The occultation method is one of the very few methods capable to detect Earth-sized planets in the Habitable Zone (HZ) of their parent star within the few next years.
The HZ around a star is defined as the orbital distance at which the planet temperature allows for liquid water. This is of paramount importance for the search for Life in the Universe.
ESA then plans to continue its search for with the launch of Darwin and the flotilla of spacecraft flying in formation will take pictures of Earth-like worlds
-occultation method gives acces to:
1. The orbital period, and thus the orbital distance to the star, of the planet
2. The radius of the planet deduced from the luminosity drop during the transit
3. The inclination i of the planetary orbit; this quantity becomes astrophysically interesting when compared to the equatorial plane of the parent star - deduced from its V.sin i and rotation period

other exo-planet missions to look out for are

NASA's TPF was a great design but got its funding cut
http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=38163
and another ESA's Gaia, which seems to be going well
http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=12295&page=2

Launch window
2006-Mar-08, 05:13 AM
Broadcast a space message to 47-UMa
http://www.cosmicconnexion.com/static/index.html
This exercise in Active SETI (ASETI) appears to be the "celebration"
part of the COROT sat mission to find extrasolar planets, including Earth-size or Telluric ones. 47 Ursae Majoris (UMa) is located about 45.9 light-years from Sol. In '96, astronomers announced the discovery of a Jupiter-like planet around this Sun-like star. 47-UrsaeMajoris was one of the top target stars for NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder ( TPF )

Manchurian Taikonaut
2006-Mar-09, 10:05 PM
5 best stellar candidates for ET & Earth

http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=38283&page=2

Top 5 SETI search candidates & Top 5 Earth-analogue cadidates

publiusr
2006-Mar-09, 11:11 PM
Broadcast a space message to 47-UMa
http://www.cosmicconnexion.com/static/index.html
This exercise in Active SETI (ASETI) appears to be the "celebration"
part of the COROT sat mission to find extrasolar planets, including Earth-size or Telluric ones. 47 Ursae Majoris (UMa) is located about 45.9 light-years from Sol. In '96, astronomers announced the discovery of a Jupiter-like planet around this Sun-like star. 47-UrsaeMajoris was one of the top target stars for NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder ( TPF )

I was wonderering when that star would get some love.

Launch window
2006-Mar-10, 04:37 AM
The Corot mission will be launced by Russia's Soyuz-Fregat launcher at Baikonur

Manchurian Taikonaut
2006-Mar-10, 07:37 PM
The Corot mission will be launced by Russia's Soyuz-Fregat launcher at Baikonur







10 March 2006
Due for launch in 2006, Corot will be the first mission capable of detecting rocky planets outside our Solar System.
http://www.euronews.net/create_html.php?page=space&lng=1
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMISENVGJE_index_0.html
This week EuroNews takes a closer look at this 30-centimetre diameter space telescope which will be able to detect tiny changes in brightness from nearby stars.

Launch window
2006-Mar-13, 06:23 AM
some more on it here
Convection and Rotation of stars (COROT)
http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/C/COROT.html
While it is looking at a star, COROT will also be able to detect starquakes that send ripples across a stars surface, altering its brightness.

Study of EPS ( Extrasolar Planetary Systems ) with Corot
http://solarsystem.dlr.de/Missions/corot/caesp/dynamics.shtml

Launch window
2006-Mar-24, 08:25 PM
pics and movies
http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/A_gallerie.htm

folkhemmet
2006-Mar-25, 01:56 AM
A couple dyas ago I read a news update at astronomy.com having to do with the Corot mission. The article took the line that Corot may be a beacon of hope in a field which looks like it does not much of a future due to the recent foolish NASA science cuts. The article said Corot is slated for launch this June. I thought it was supposed to launch in October. In any case, if Corot turns out to be successful, then we will know quite a bit more about the frequency of large terrestrial planets around relatively nearby stars. I say a bit more because due to the recent microlensing planet discoveries we can now say with 90% that 16-67 % of all stars have planets.

The Kepler mission, due to launch in 2008, will be a substantial improvement over Corot. I hope Kepler doesn't fall to the ax just like TPF in the next few years.

So come 2015 or so we should know the frequency of terrestrial planets around stars of spectral types M-F (single and multiple), but we will have no way to test for habitability because some fools thought the space shuttle and ISS are more important than space science.

folkhemmet
2006-Mar-25, 02:01 AM
A couple days ago I read a news update at astronomy.com having to do with the Corot mission. The article took the line that Corot may be a beacon of hope in a field which looks like it does not much of a future due to the recent foolish NASA science cuts. The article said Corot is slated for launch this June. I thought it was supposed to launch in October. In any case, if Corot turns out to be successful, then we will know quite a bit more about the frequency of large terrestrial planets around relatively nearby stars. I say a bit more because due to the recent microlensing planet discoveries we can now say with 90% confidence that 16-67 % of all stars have large terrestrial planets.

The Kepler mission, due to launch in 2008, will be a substantial improvement over Corot. I hope Kepler doesn't fall to the ax just like TPF in the next few years.

So come 2015 or so we should know the frequency of terrestrial planets around stars of spectral types M-F (single and multiple), but we will have no way to test for habitability because some fools thought the ISS, which has been pretty scientifically worthless, is more important than space science.

Kullat Nunu
2006-Mar-25, 03:17 PM
COROT will be launched in October 2006, the article had outdated information.

Launch window
2006-Mar-29, 10:52 AM
COROT will be launched in October 2006, the article had outdated information.


Thanks for the updates, its will be good to see this exoplanet mission fly

Launch window
2006-Mar-31, 12:48 AM
some photos of the telescope

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMOVO8YFDD_Germany_1.html

Launch window
2006-Apr-02, 03:17 AM
Rotation speed and stellar axis inclination from p modes:
http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0603671
How CoRoT would see other suns

Launch window
2006-Apr-17, 08:52 AM
Corot Space Telescope On Target For October Launch

by Staff Writers
Paris, France (SPX) Apr 17, 2006

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Corot_Space_Telescope_On_Target_For_October_Launch .html
The Corot Space Telescope has completed its electromagnetic compatibility and vibration testing successfully and remains on schedule for launch this October, CNES said in a statement Wednesday.

Launch window
2006-Aug-02, 10:49 PM
transiting planet animation

http://www.iaa.es/corot/transitanimE.html

Launch window
2006-Aug-28, 01:33 AM
Transiting EXTRA-SOLAR PLANET Workshop

http://www.mpia-hd.mpg.de/transits/wk/rationale_transitwk.html

....Over 20 ground-based experiments using the transit technique are being undertaken world-wide. Several missions from space have been launched or are to be launched in the near future, such as MOST, Corot, and Kepler. Despite this large number of experiments hunting transits, presently only ten transiting extrasolar planets are known, all in the
Jupiter mass domain: HD209458b (Mazeh et al. 2000), HD149026 (Sato et al. 2005) and HD189733b (Bouchy et al. 2005), detected originally with radial velocity. Five planets found by the OGLE group: OGLE-TR-56b (Konacki et al. 2003), OGLE-TR-113b and OGLE-TR-132b (Bouchy et al. 2004), OGLE-TR-111b (Pont et al. 2004) and OGLE-TR-10b (Bouchy et al. 2005, Konacki et al. 2005), and TrES-1, detected by the STARE telescope of the Trans-Atlantic Exoplanet Survey (Alonso et al. 2004), and the XO planet (McCullough et al. 2006).
The workshop is intended to address several topics related to Transit Astronomy, in order to offer a global overview of the status of the field, regarding observational strategies, methods to select transits, as well as detections and characterization of planets. Moreover, the workshop intends to offer a discussion platform for new approaches, methodologies, and the issue of radial velocity follow-up observations for fainter host stars.

Sporally
2006-Sep-06, 09:21 PM
I was searching the web for an exact launch date of the COROT and i was lead hereto. So news on the exact launch date? Everywhere i look it says October, but no site gives a more exact date than that, and now it is 2 months away at most unless it is postponed. My guess is there is a date set for every launch two months before, so the launch date of COROT should have been revealed...

Launch window
2006-Sep-07, 12:39 AM
The timetable is Russian not European after trouble with the launch of Metop satellite the Corot mission got delayed, also a short circuit occurred during final testing of the spacecraft in Italy. The last I heard was Nov 2006 but I've even seen a quote that said it would be delayed to 2007

the French are leading this one in cooperation with European countries and Brazil

The European Ariane rocket won't be launching this one, it will be the Russian Soyuz-Fregat launcher at Baikonur


some pics here
http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/qualif_meca.htm
If you want to mail them to ask for the date Corot contacts can be found here ( you might have to use the French language )
http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/GP_contacts.htm

Sporally
2006-Sep-07, 03:34 PM
I don't speak french:) But ok, let's keep november in mind just to have something to hold onto, and i will get back to this thread in late october or the start of november in case i don't find any newer info on the net.

Doodler
2006-Sep-07, 03:39 PM
If it turns out to be sensitive enough, this could also be used to detect exomoons as well. There was some discussion of the possibility that the OGLE group might have a shot at the title for this one by observing smaller transits ahead of, and trailing behind, a known transiting exoplanet.

Sporally
2006-Sep-08, 06:16 PM
If it turns out to be sensitive enough, this could also be used to detect exomoons as well.

Wow, this is really amazing in case it is possible, because i believe exomoons are where we should look for life. I believe life on exomoons are more common in the universe than life on exoplanets - my guess is that there are many solar systems where the smallest exoplanets are gas planets but if you ask me, exomoons with a size suitable for life are found in almost every solar system.

I coincidentially found this link which states that COROT is to launch November 15th.

http://exoplanet.eu/searches.php

Launch window
2006-Sep-16, 04:59 PM
Flight Acceptance Review, in Cannes, from 5 to 7 September 2006
http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/GP_actualite.htm#sept2006a
This review board meeting, jointly organized by CNES and Alcatel Alenia Space teams, had the objective to pronounce technical qualification of the COROT satellite before moving to Baikonour. This major milestone took place after the spacecraft has completed all environmental and functional system testing successfully and shown that the telescope works well together in harmony with the vehicule operations.

Sporally
2006-Sep-17, 04:14 PM
Ok, thx for the info... BTW: When i first heard about COROT i believe i heard it would be the first spaceborn telescope ever to study nothing but exoplanets. However, i believe that is not correct, or will Kepler be the first of this kind? Are exoplanets its main task?

Launch window
2006-Sep-17, 04:51 PM
Ok, thx for the info... BTW: When i first heard about COROT i believe i heard it would be the first spaceborn telescope ever to study nothing but exoplanets. However, i believe that is not correct, or will Kepler be the first of this kind? Are exoplanets its main task?

As I understand, stellar asteroseismology is Corot's main objective, the exoplanet part is secondary, Corot's number 1 objective will be watching starquakes - quakes sending ripples across a stars' surface. This will allow calculation of a star's precise mass, and chemical composition and will allow us to make comparisons between our sun and the stars which Corot is watching.

Launch window
2006-Sep-17, 04:54 PM
Here is some info on the Kepler mission

http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/kepler.htm

As far as I know exoplanet are its main task, but Corot will be launching first

Sporally
2006-Sep-17, 09:48 PM
I guess my knowledge on Kepler is far greater than on knowledge on COROT, so no need for the link though, but thx anyway, and thx anyway and for your answer...

Launch window
2006-Oct-01, 04:34 AM
Delayed
next timetable for Corot is a Baikonur Cosmodrome launch from Kazakhstan in December 2006

Sporally
2006-Oct-02, 01:38 PM
Link? Not that i don't believe you, but for additional reading:)

Launch window
2006-Oct-02, 10:23 PM
These 2 good sites are up to date on launches
http://sworld.com.au/steven/space/russia-man.txt
http://www.skyrocket.de/space/doc_chr/lau2006.htm
the first one does say 29th of Nov, so it might launch before December ? But I did also see the December dated quoted at that uplink Space forum

Sporally
2006-Oct-04, 06:25 PM
Oh great. This second link was exactly was i was needing, great. However, maybe too much information on commercial launches, but i can surely live with that. I guess the december launch is the true one. The guy who administrates the site has to have gained the information from somewhere, so i expect the information on the december launch to be the newest information as we rarely launch rocket prior to the deadline. But the information on the november launch is pretty new information, so i guess we can't entirely deny that one before we get a confirmation from elsewhere on the december launch.

Toymaker
2006-Nov-26, 01:45 AM
http://www.astrobio.net/news/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=2150&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0
(http://www.astrobio.net/news/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=2150&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0)


Also discussed was the upcoming CoRoT mission, a space telescope that will search for extrasolar planets by looking for transits -- where a planet crosses in front of its star and therefore blocks some of the starlight that reaches us. CoRoT will be able to spot short period transits of 50 days or less, so only planets very close to their stars will be discovered by this mission.


As I am a total amatour what does this mean ? Does anybody know in what AU from the main star planets can be detected and what are limits of Cotor ?

Sporally
2006-Nov-26, 03:17 PM
Here is a very great diagram that shows how big a planet Corot and the future telescopes. You can see that Corot can actually discover a planet that is only twice as great as the

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Extrasolar_Planets_2004-08-31.png

The greater the planet the easier it is to detect because it blocks more of the starlight than a smaller planet. But the planet's distance from the star is of course also important. Maybe someone can explain this in a better way. Here's a link to Wiki that explains how it works, or you could wait for others to explain it. I guess someone could do it better than me;)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methods_of_detecting_extrasolar_planets#Transit_me thod

ASEI
2006-Nov-26, 05:09 PM
Just curious, I thought I read something the other day about TPF getting axed? Is that true? (If so, grrrr! I was waiting for some very interesting results from that mission!)

Sporally
2006-Nov-26, 09:45 PM
Really, i hope not. The europeans have a great upcoming mission - Darwin, a cornerstone mission, so it most surely won't be removed. But in general we have some great once upcoming. Here are those i know of (i haven't got my list with me right now, but maybe i can remember the most of them). Not all missions i write are purely exoplanet searchers. Plz add some in case i haven't heard about them or have forgotten about them.

Corot
Kepler
Terrestial planet finder (2 missions, i think one of them is called I and the other one is know with another letter)
Darwin
SIM
Gaia

Most certainly i have forgotten some. I recall this list to be longer, but plz tell me if you can add any to the list.

EDIT: Now those mission on the list are either small ones (more or less) that will be launched soon, or big projects that will be launched many years for now. Do you think we will see more missions in the size of Corot and Kepler or will we only see big projects from now on?

Toymaker
2006-Nov-27, 12:19 AM
he europeans have a great upcoming mission - Darwin, a cornerstone mission, so it most surely won't be removed.
From its description i always thought it was going to be in reality a common EU-USA project and it was dependent on development made in USA

Launch window
2006-Nov-27, 06:01 AM
From its description i always thought it was going to be in reality a common EU-USA project and it was dependent on development made in USA

Europe has done great missions Venus Express, Smart-1, Rosetta but they lack experience of other space agencies like NASA, and a mission like Darwin is very far away from the green light.

The US has been the superpower when it comes to exploration but recent missions got bad budget cuts, TPF may not get off the ground do to lack of funding.

The solution may be to do a joint NASA-ESA mission like Soho or Cassini-Huygens.

I suspect this mission may be a combined effort TerrestrialPlanetFinder-Darwin

Sporally
2006-Nov-27, 02:25 PM
From its description i always thought it was going to be in reality a common EU-USA project and it was dependent on development made in USA

You might be right on this one. I read it was an ESA mission, but maybe they are the main financial contributer to this mission.

Romanus
2006-Nov-27, 03:32 PM
With TPF and SIM looking canned here, I've got my fingers mad crossed for Darwin and GAIA; I think they are by far the most important missions that will be launched the next decade.

Sporally
2006-Nov-27, 04:58 PM
I SIM in danger aswell? I thought that mission was way into the development phase and way too important to get cancelled, and for this reason it wouldn't get shut down. But let's hope. TPF is a very expensive project so there should be some extra funds available although there are massive budget cuts.

Launch window
2006-Dec-06, 02:40 PM
COROT fuels up

4 December 2006
The COROT satellite has completed an important step in its 5-week launch campaign after fuelling up for its almost 3-year mission. Launch is currently scheduled for 21 December from the Baikonur cosmodrome, in Kazakhstan.
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/COROT/SEMMFV8L6VE_0.html
Following its arrival 15 November at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, COROT was immediately transferred to the MIK 112 integration and test building, where it will remain until shortly before launch.

Sporally
2006-Dec-06, 05:13 PM
Strange.. On this site it says that the mission launch has just been postponed to december 27th. But nothing is mentioned on the ESA site:think:

http://exoplanet.eu/

Launch window
2006-Dec-10, 12:15 PM
Planet Detector is to launch soon!!
http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/68188/Planet_Detector_is_to_launch_soon_

Sporally
2006-Dec-10, 04:02 PM
You know, Planet Detector isn't a mission, they just state that Corot is a planet detector;)

Launch window
2006-Dec-21, 06:07 AM
You know, Planet Detector isn't a mission, they just state that Corot is a planet detector;)
Nevermind that,
Jounralists love to play with words even if the headlines seem silly to those with a scientific background


The UT site has a story on it

http://www.universetoday.com/2006/12/20/next-up-the-corot-space-telescope/

Look for 'starquakes' will be its main mission, planet hunting is secondary

Eroica
2006-Dec-21, 09:41 AM
Corot (http://www.cnes-tv.com/corot_en/index.html)


After a launch campaign that started on 15 November, Corot is on tip-top form. the launch is scheduled on 27 December, 15:23 Paris time.

Sporally
2006-Dec-21, 02:34 PM
@Launch window
I can't agree on that. I don't know what the scientists wants the most, but it is a 50/50 split. COROT has two instruments, one for detecting starquakes and one for detecting planets.

Blob
2006-Dec-21, 03:46 PM
Since the discovery in 1995 of the first extra solar planet. more than two hundred have been identified using ground-based telescopes. COROT will be launched on 27 December 2006 by a Soyuz rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, and will be placed in a polar orbit around Earth at an altitude of some 850 fifty kilometres. Led by the French Space Agency CNES, the COROT mission today has a wide-ranging European scientific and technological participation including ESA, Austria, Belgium, Brazil and Germany.

ESApod video programme (http://a1862.g.akamai.net/7/1862/14448/v1/esa.download.akamai.com/13452/podcast/COROT_14-12-06.mp4) (24.39mb, mp4)

Sporally
2006-Dec-21, 08:32 PM
Nice movie. Not much new in it for me though, but still nice ;)

Launch window
2006-Dec-24, 07:33 AM
nature have a story on it
http://www.nature.com/news/2006/061218/full/061218-16.html

they also mention future NASA missions

Besides searching for Earth-like planets, COROT will measure ripples on the surface of the stars and study how these change the wavelength of the stars' light. The ripples seen on a star's surface are caused by acoustical waves originating deep inside a star, so this information can give details about its inner workings. "We can retrieve information about the stellar density and temperature profile and determine how the star rotates," says Fridlund. "COROT is a mission with two objectives, and will be doing both of them in beautiful harmony."

COROT is the first of an international battery of planned studies of distant stars. Following closely behind is NASA's Kepler mission, due to launch in late 2008, which will stare at the same place for four years, and may therefore spy an Earth-like planet in transit. After that are planned ESA's Darwin mission in 2015, and NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder, though the funding and timing on these missions are uncertain.

Launch window
2006-Dec-26, 11:24 AM
Mission guide: Corot
The quest to track down Earth-like planets outside of the Solar System is to be boosted with the launch of a new mission.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6213150.stm
Corot (COnvection, ROtation and planetary Transits), which is due to launch on 27 December, will be capable of detecting small rocky planets of a similar size to our own.

Wolf-S
2006-Dec-26, 07:30 PM
There will be a live webcast of the launch at:
http://www.videocorner.tv/index.php?langue=en
(on 27th December, 14:23 GMT)

Sporally
2006-Dec-26, 09:47 PM
Ok, honorstly i think we are going over the same over and over again. Maybe we should stop writing the same things about this mission all the time, and though we are getting new links to new pages they all state the same;)

I was actually returning to this thread as the COROT mission was not a NASA mission, in which case i didn't know if there would be a live webcast tomorrow, but Wolf-S just provided me with a link for this, great job Wolf-S;)

ciderman
2006-Dec-27, 04:16 PM
Yaaay!
Corot has launched.:clap:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6203161.stm

Lets hope the rest of the deployment goes smoothly, I'm really looking foward to the results from this mission, should be very interesting.

Edit: Wolf-S' link above has a press conference at the moment, it's all sounding good, solar panels deployed:)

Sporally
2006-Dec-27, 05:18 PM
Yeah, it was an exciting moment, though not the greatest launch i've seen:p But fair enough, afterall i was happy to hear that everything until now went alright. How long a preparation period is expected for COROT before the first field will be looked at (the first 150-day field somewhere near Orion that is)?

MaDeR
2006-Dec-27, 07:19 PM
Main phase of mission? Starts about end of January.

Maksutov
2006-Dec-28, 08:40 AM
Yeah, it was an exciting moment, though not the greatest launch i've seen:pWhat was the greatest launch you've seen?
But fair enough, afterall i was happy to hear that everything until now went alright.Why do I get feeling you'd love for something to go wrong?
How long a preparation period is expected for COROT before the first field will be looked at (the first 150-day field somewhere near Orion that is)?January for the first light. Then follows something called "exploration" which is not tied to timetables. It's tied in to something called "science".

http://img152.imageshack.us/img152/4627/eusarolleyes7ou.gif

Tom Mazanec
2006-Dec-28, 06:33 PM
Main phase of mission? Starts about end of January.
So we should start getting results in, say, a couple months (at least on "Hot Jupiters")?

01101001
2006-Dec-28, 07:24 PM
So we should start getting results in, say, a couple months (at least on "Hot Jupiters")?

They may start getting results in a couple of months. But, we?

I don't believe that is their track record, to announce results in a couple of months.

I suggest patience. I'd be happy to be surprised that it's not necessary.

Doodler
2006-Dec-28, 07:31 PM
So we should start getting results in, say, a couple months (at least on "Hot Jupiters")?

This is an ESA mission. With luck, they'll announce the successful launch in March. We might see results of first light about the time I collect my first Social Security check.

ciderman
2006-Dec-28, 07:47 PM
Heh, I didn't want to to be the first to say it:shifty:

Patience, expecting a long wait & hoping to be happily surprised by some released results before, say, 2008 were the very things I was thinking:lol:

Doodler
2006-Dec-28, 07:53 PM
Heh, I didn't want to to be the first to say it:shifty:

Resident visigoth and card carrying wisebutt, at your service. ;)


Patience, expecting a long wait & hoping to be happily surprised by some released results before, say, 2008 were the very things I was thinking:lol:

A bit more reasonable, but I was being deliberately obnoxious for the sake of invoking a laugh. :)

ciderman
2006-Dec-28, 08:33 PM
Well, I was happily suprised to find the CNES site has an english version..
:D

To be serious though, that's a good site with plenty of info, worth a rummage though;
http://smsc.cnes.fr/html-images/HomeGB.html

Even a quasi-timetable here for activities


During the 1st two weeks of January, the satellite will begin its calibration phase..
The instrument’s shutter will only be opened after this 2-week calibration phase..
Depending on how preliminary testing goes, COROT should be ready to generate its 1st scientific results within 1 to 2 months.
from;
http://www.cnes.fr/web/5662-corots-christmas-gift-to-cnes-teams.php

JonClarke
2006-Dec-28, 11:10 PM
This is not a pretty pictures mission that can be readily interpreted by the hoi poloi. It will take a lot on analysis, I suspect to extract meaning from the results. So I won't expect anything for a year or so, and it would be unfair to think otherwise.

And I don't find people being obnoxious worth a laugh.

Doodler
2006-Dec-28, 11:48 PM
I've no doubt its going to be at least a year before the first reasonable detections can be made. Heck, they'll be three months or so alone just calibrating it after first light.

I'm personally of the belief, given the ESA's track record, that even if there is something worth being told come the end of the year, the odds of them deigning to share that information outside of their cloistered little crew are slight at best.

The ESA has earned its reputation for holding out information, and quite frankly, a lot of it is indefensible as anything other than extreme intellectual proprietarianism. They are under no obigation from their sponsoring nations to publicly disclose their information in a timely manner, so they simply don't until they deign giving the "hoi poloi" something to chew on.

Not an attitude that will garner much respect, truth be told.

ciderman
2006-Dec-29, 01:53 AM
I've never had the impression this would be a pretty pictures mission, but rather a decent scientific observation, giving some robust, statistically valid, data, enabling mankind to fill in some of the gaps in the Drake equation, plus loads more!
Of course it's going to take some time to get everything set up & calibrated, & then a long time making observations.
& then the interpretation & analysis.
Perhaps then we can have some peer review & critique of techniques.
Thats fine, I'm prepared to wait.

I'd rather not have to wait any longer than is necessary though, & ESA has not traditionally been as exuberant in its public engagement as, say, NASA.
Neither do they have anything like the same resources so it's unreasonable to expect then to do so, especially as they have more than one nation(+ culture & language) to reach!
Not that I'm disagreeing with Doodler though, oh no.

But things are looking up, I find the style & delivery of the pages found ere'
http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/index.htm
quite encouraging, perhaps this time more of an effort will be made to engage the interested, educated & intelligent(around here anyway;) ) hoi poloi/plebians/mops/taxpayers.

JonClarke
2006-Dec-29, 02:34 AM
Given the low public interest in such an imageless mission, regardless of whose mission it is, I would expect the result ot be announced through conferences and then peer-reviewed papers. I don't think ESA mission scientists are any slower in this than those of NASA.

Jon

MaDeR
2006-Dec-29, 11:54 AM
Given the low public interest in such an imageless mission
Normally, yes. But I think that public would be interested in actual holder of record "closest to Earth" planet in terms of temperature, distance, mass etc. And articles will have images. Artistic, of course. ;)

Romanus
2006-Dec-29, 03:48 PM
<<I'm personally of the belief, given the ESA's track record, that even if there is something worth being told come the end of the year, the odds of them deigning to share that information outside of their cloistered little crew are slight at best.>>

I respectfully disagree. While ESA's proprietism is indeed much greater than NASA's, the discovery of Earth-like planets would be so momentous--and such a feather in their cap--that we're sure to hear all about it when it happens. For my part, I'm guessing a year until we hear about the first planet detections (terrestrial or otherwise)--certainly no more than a year and a half.

What I worry about, is how easy it will be to follow up on these observations; how many detections will be too slight to observe with something other than a space-based telescope?

Doodler
2006-Dec-29, 04:14 PM
What I worry about, is how easy it will be to follow up on these observations; how many detections will be too slight to observe with something other than a space-based telescope?

Terrestrials will probably be nigh impossible to cross check from the ground. I mean, the whole reason Corot's flying is to achieve a level of sensitivity we can't get on the ground.

Then again, if all goes well with the Hubble's last servicing mission, there just might be a scope around that can back Corot up.

Sporally
2006-Dec-29, 04:38 PM
Given the low public interest in such an imageless mission, regardless of whose mission it is, I would expect the result ot be announced through conferences and then peer-reviewed papers. I don't think ESA mission scientists are any slower in this than those of NASA.

Jon

Yeah, the public not normally interested in space stuff want pictures, but i am very satisfied with numbers when it comes to exoplanets and a little 'Artists impression'-picture is quite nice for me aswell:dance:


Normally, yes. But I think that public would be interested in actual holder of record "closest to Earth" planet in terms of temperature, distance, mass etc. And articles will have images. Artistic, of course. ;)

I don't think distance will be too interesting as the distance from the stars is only interesting because it defines the temperature, but the distance is only interesting if you have a star the same size as Earth - because then they will have approximately the same temperature if the distance is the same. But if we have a red dwarf star with an exoplanet, it is not that interesting to see the orbit close to that of Earth. Hope you get me:lol:

MaDeR
2006-Dec-29, 07:02 PM
Hope you get me:lol:
I get. Nothing changes. Simply "interesting distance" in case of red dwarf will be different than "interesting distance" in case of yellow dwarf. Well, and artistic picture will feautre reddish star instead of yellow. :D

Doodler
2006-Dec-29, 07:38 PM
I get. Nothing changes. Simply "interesting distance" in case of red dwarf will be different than "interesting distance" in case of yellow dwarf. Well, and artistic picture will feautre reddish star instead of yellow. :D

Seriously, the artist rendering of the 10 hour epistellar jovian around a red dwarf looked WILD. :D

Eckelston
2006-Dec-29, 10:40 PM
Terrestrials will probably be nigh impossible to cross check from the ground. I mean, the whole reason Corot's flying is to achieve a level of sensitivity we can't get on the ground.

Then again, if all goes well with the Hubble's last servicing mission, there just might be a scope around that can back Corot up.

I think it's just not practical to use the big scopes to search for transits becouse they have a small field of view (and a lot of other things to do). The beauty of follow-up observations is that you already know exactly when and where to look so it takes less time. I'm sure Keck or VLT people would very much like to be mentioned as discoverers of the first Earth-like planet, even in a supporting role, and even the STScI might be convnced to spare a few hours of Hubble observing time.

The real confirmation however would come through radial velocity. HARPS in theory capable of detecting terrestrial planets in close orbits given enough observation time. Again, time is limited but if you have a very good candidate with a not to active star it might just be worth a try.

Sporally
2006-Dec-29, 11:07 PM
Could i tell you to plz attend this thread to get more info on this thread's subject. I know it is a very different discussion thant this...
http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=51492

I guess we should use the wide field of views satellites like COROT to find the planets, and when a planet of great interest (or semi-great in COROTs situation) is found, the observers with the small field of view could be used for further study.

JonClarke
2006-Dec-29, 11:34 PM
I'm personally of the belief, given the ESA's track record, that even if there is something worth being told come the end of the year, the odds of them deigning to share that information outside of their cloistered little crew are slight at best.

The ESA has earned its reputation for holding out information, and quite frankly, a lot of it is indefensible as anything other than extreme intellectual proprietarianism. They are under no obigation from their sponsoring nations to publicly disclose their information in a timely manner, so they simply don't until they deign giving the "hoi poloi" something to chew on.

Not an attitude that will garner much respect, truth be told.

This is utter nonsense.

ESA are obliged to release data on a regular basis, and do so. The public accessed data for mars Express is updated every 6 months. It is just not in a browers-friendly mode that's all. It's designed for processions with specialist software This exactly the same as NASA, BTW. You can't just download the raw data from for example MOLA. In fact, the software to handle NASA data is often very difficult for people to obtain outside the US. ESA raw data is accessible to anyone, anywhere. Furthermore the immediate release of images onto the internet by NASA is a quite recent innovation, and when begun was heavily criticised by a number of mission scientists, with good reason.

ESA mission scientists are under as much professional obligation as any other scientist to publish their results ASAP. And the do so. ESA mission data is regularly presented at international conferences such as EGU, AGU, and LSPC. Abstracts are on line. The peer reviewed papers appear at a rate compable to their NASA counterparts. There is no "cloistered little crew".

That said, ESA is a different organisation with different goals and rules to NASA. It is ludicrous to expect the two organisations to work along the same lines. ESA does not have the public education brief that NASA has. That is not the fault of ESA, that is the mission they have been given by their political masters. Why should they spend a large amount of their smaller budget on something that they are not required to do? It would divert funds from something they are required to - like data analysis.

ESA is also funded very differently to NASA. It does not have to fight every year for a budget allocation. Instead it is funded in 5-year cycles with per captia contributions from member states. Unlike NASA, a high public profile does not equate to a better likelihood of greater funding.

Of course, it would be nice if we could see all the pretty pictures. But the ESA policy is entirely understandable and defensible in context. People just have to be patient and wait for the published research.

Jon

Toymaker
2007-Jan-05, 01:16 AM
As far as my limited knowledge about the stars and planets, I recall that existance of planets is thought to be related to metallicity in stars. Does anybody know if this criteria been used in choosing stars to study by Corot ?

Doodler
2007-Jan-05, 02:12 AM
As far as my limited knowledge about the stars and planets, I recall that existance of planets is thought to be related to metallicity in stars. Does anybody know if this criteria been used in choosing stars to study by Corot ?

For the planet hunting phase, it would only be logical. For the stargazing phase, the field would likely be wide open. Given that planet hunting is a secondary mission, the first planet captured will likely be incidental to its main purpose.

Sporally
2007-Jan-12, 04:25 PM
I don't know if i read about COROT on the wrong pages, but i've always thought the planet hunting thing to be the first priority or equal priority.

ciderman
2007-Jan-12, 06:23 PM
Hmm, yep I thought it was equal with the erm, is it astroseismology?
That should tell us some interesting things about the structure of many stars I think, really is a good dual investigation this one!

Oh, look, first image!!
http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/GP_actualite.htm#janv2007

Ok, it's a dark image with the cover still closed!:razz:
Still it is nice to be told, & apparently the orbits so good they've saved a bit of fuel, perhaps this means it may be possible to extend the mission longer than planned, excellent news.:clap:

Edit:

COROT has two scientific objectives
details here (& some really nice animations of oscillating modes on the Stellar Seismology link)
http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/GP_science.htm

Sporally
2007-Jan-12, 11:14 PM
First picture from COROT, really nice:)

ToSeek
2007-Jan-18, 07:31 PM
Planet-seeking satellite takes first images (http://space.newscientist.com/article/dn10986-planetseeking-satellite-takes-first-images.html)


A planet-hunting satellite that launched in December has opened its eye to the stars. Its first images suggest the satellite's instruments are in good working order, paving the way for planet searching to begin in February.

The mission, called Convection Rotation and planetary Transits (COROT) and led by France's Centre Nationale d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), launched on 27 December from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan (see Planet-finding telescope blasts off).

It will use a 27-centimetre telescope to look for the tiny brightness dips of stars caused by planets passing in front of them, potentially spotting planets just two or three times the size of Earth (see COROT to scout for rocky planets around other stars).

COROT's ability to spot small brightness fluctuations will also allow it to study flickering light from Sun-like stars, caused by giant sound waves that reverberate inside them.

Launch window
2007-Jan-25, 10:54 AM
ESA news-item

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMH7ASMTWE_index_0.html

(mostly a repeat of what ToSeek posted)

ciderman
2007-Feb-12, 10:03 PM
"The performance of the instruments and of the spacecraft is simply excellent. It is actually exceeding our expectations, with pointing capabilities truly remarkable and the performance of the ESA-built telescope baffle about 60 percent better than foreseen," said Malcolm Fridlund, ESA Project Scientist for COROT. "Such success has allowed the satellite verification to last only 5 weeks from launch, and the science mission to start some time in advance."
from
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=21848

Whoo-hoo!!:dance:
more here
http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/GP_actualite.htm#janv2007

ToSeek
2007-May-01, 09:20 PM
Corot overview from "Dynamics of Cats" science blog (http://scienceblogs.com/catdynamics/2007/05/corot.php)


Corot (http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/index.htm) is a very nifty little satellite.
It is a french space agency small satellite, designed to measure convection, rotation and to find planets.
It started off as an astroseismology mission (http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/GP_science.htm), in the Proteus (http://smsc.cnes.fr/PROTEUS/) class of standardised mini-satellite buses (hey! now there's a concept, standardized satellite buses for different class missions to reduce long term cost and enhance mission development... now if only someone else would do that, and stick with it for more than one funding cycle!).

MaDeR
2007-May-02, 12:52 AM
Anyone knows when will be first results from COROT? I heard (well, read) rumors that results will be in this week...

ToSeek
2007-May-02, 07:27 PM
Corot teaser (http://scienceblogs.com/catdynamics/2007/05/corot_teaser.php)


New Scientist has a teaser article (http://space.newscientist.com/article/mg19426023.800-european-planet-hunters-on-brink-of-earthsized-prize.html)(sub) about Corot... Sounds like Corot is exceeding specs and will exceed specifications - if I translate it correctly they will get to under 100 ppm, compared to specs of 700 ppm for photometry of their brighter sources.
That is pushing close to Kepler sensitivity and will make them sensitive to smaller, and lower mass, planets.
They will still be limited to shorter orbital periods, but they may push into the habitable planets in the habitable zone for K dwarfs, and definitely for M dwarfs.
Soooon.
Nature is also dropping hints (http://www.nature.com/news/2007/070430/full/447007a.html)(sub)
This is fun.

Kullat Nunu
2007-May-03, 06:31 PM
New Scientist Space: European planet hunters on brink of Earth-sized prize (http://space.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=mg19426023.800&feedId=space_rss20)


“Working at its new sensitivity, COROT should easily find Earth-sized worlds in the habitable zone of red dwarf stars.”

Kullat Nunu
2007-May-03, 06:34 PM
Anyone knows when will be first results from COROT? I heard (well, read) rumors that results will be in this week...

The rumors were apparently true... COROT has discovered its first planet. Nothing special in that, though. CORRECTION: Although it is more massive than Jupiter, it is large even for an inflated planet.

I guess they have more candidates on hold, but radial velocity confirmation is needed before they can be announced.

Romanus
2007-May-03, 09:17 PM
Part of me is just parochial enough to be saddened if COROT scoops Kepler, but by and large I find this tremendously exciting--finding a truly Earth-like planet is an achievement for all of us. :)

And here I was thinking we wouldn't hear about COROT's results until its primary mission was over, plus the proprietary year...

ToSeek
2007-May-03, 09:21 PM
Planetary Society blog: COROT has bagged its first planet (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00000960/)


ESA announced today that the planet-hunting satellite COROT has bagged its first exoplanet in observations of the star COROT-Exo-1, located 1,500 light-years away in the constellation Monoceros. This telltale drop in the brightness of the star in the graph below indicates that a planet -- in this case, a "hot Jupiter" gas giant about 1.3 times the mass of Jupiter -- transited the star, momentarily darkening its disk. From the speed of its transit, COROT's scientists determined that the planet orbits close to the star with an orbital period of only 1.5 days.

ESA press release: COROT discovers its first exoplanet and catches scientists by surprise (http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMCKNU681F_index_0.html)


COROT has provided its first image of a giant planet orbiting another star and the first bit of ‘seismic’ information on a far away, Sun-like star- with unexpected accuracy.

The unanticipated level of accuracy of this raw data shows that COROT will be able to see rocky planets - perhaps even as small as Earth - and possibly provide an indication of their chemical composition.

MaDeR
2007-May-05, 01:39 PM
The unanticipated level of accuracy of this raw data shows that COROT will be able to see rocky planets - perhaps even as small as Earth - and possibly provide an indication of their chemical composition.
This is too good to be true. But if... then maybe NASA nad money-givers (congress) can not only launch Kepler without any another slippage, but resurrect TPF...

Launch window
2007-May-25, 07:22 PM
" According to the latest news coming from the COROT front, the spacecraft that, according to Malcolm Fridlund, the Mission’s Project Scientist, "was certainly born under a lucky star" will be able to detect smaller exoplanets than expected, even those Earth-sized and, if circumstances allow so, to achieve information about their chemical composition. I asked Dr. Fridlund for some more details that could permit a better understanding of the processes that lead to this possiblity."

http://spaceurope.blogspot.com/2007/05/corot-140507-update-with-malcolm.html


According to his words there are two particular issues to have in account for and both reside in the staggering fact that COROT has surpassed its specifications for a large margin and it is working more than 10 times better than expected, first of all, eclipses that can be detected are “shallower and thus the planets detectable are going to be smaller. If the periods are short enough so that we can see enough eclipses for a given planet (a process called epoch-folding) we are going to be so sensitive that we could see one earth-radii planets.”

Secondly, “when a planet is not being being eclipsed or is eclipsing the star, you will see the stellar light PLUS the reflected light from the planet, while when the planet is in front or behind the planet you only see light from the star. If, you subtract these two parts of the light curve from each other, you will have a direct detection of exo-planetary light. This is what SPITZER is doing at the moment for a few large and hot exoplanets (infrared light).”

According to Dr. Fridlund “there is a faint possibility that COROT will be so sensitive” that it will be able to perform this “in VISIBLE light for large planets”, the Project Scientist adds that this will not be possible to achieve with exoplanets the size of our own but will be “nevertheless” very “interesting for exo-planetologists.”

After COROT-Exo-1b, the first exoplanet detected by COROT, what worlds are there waiting to be revealed? Now knowing the quality and accuracy of the data retrieved we, as Dr. Fridlund said “can expect great discoveries in the future”. We are waiting.

Posted by spaceurope

Launch window
2007-Aug-26, 04:33 AM
The Planetary Society Weblog
By Emily Lakdawalla (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001089/)


....A typical year for CoRoT will be two, 150 day transit observations, filled in with a few Astroseismology observations. They have to follow up each round of transit observing with around two weeks of observing time on a 1m class telescope to get radial velocity and high resolution spectral data from the newly detected exoplanets in that 2.7 x 2.7 degree patch of sky. They have not yet conducted that follow up for their first round of observations as that patch of sky is now behind the sun as seen from earth and will not be visible to telescopes for a few more months. Their second transit observation is now underway and they are about half way through this 150 day session.

Malcolm strictly asked for none of the images in his presentation to be printed or distributed. CoRoT isn't a ‘pretty pictures' sort of mission, but the graphs do make interesting viewing - look for them to start appearing in a few months time. Their first observing session looked at 11,600 targets and their first planet (CoRoT Exo 1b) was found very quickly - a 1.3 jovian mass planet orbiting with a period of 1.5 days orbiting a magnitude 15 star. This planet has been reported in the media already. The accuracy of the photometry was down to a level of 3 x 10^-4 (3 mili-magnitudes) which allows for a very accurate graph to be built up over a total of 40 transits of the planet.

New targets not already discussed include another planet around a 14th magnitude sun-like star with a period of 33 days (very long for exo-planets), another with a period of 8 days around a type G5 star, and another 1.7 day orbit around a 12.5 magnitude K0 star. He also showed a few graphs of eclipsing binary stars. These produce strange graphs as the two stars (typically one bright and one dim) add up their light, then hide one another, producing weird double peaked graphs. Malcolm also showed a few graphs of magnitude versus time to which he simply said ‘God knows what it is'. Their very first suspected transit was infact a red dwarf star grazing the disc of another star. CoRoT will provide huge amounts of data for a whole swathe of stellar investigation - not just transits and seismology.

Malcolm closed explaining that they found a few dozen transits in their first observing session - more than some expected them to find in their entire mission. The spacecraft is performing so well, and so much better than they expected that they fully expect to be able to locate Earth like planets in Earth like orbits around Sun like stars. For €150M, we'll be getting some serious points on the graph regarding habitability of exoplanets.

Kullat Nunu
2007-Aug-26, 11:47 AM
The Planetary Society Weblog
By Emily Lakdawalla (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001089/)

By Doug Ellison (user djellison), actually.

MaDeR
2007-Aug-26, 04:51 PM
Sooo...

New targets not already discussed include another planet around a 14th magnitude sun-like star with a period of 33 days (very long for exo-planets), another with a period of 8 days around a type G5 star, and another 1.7 day orbit around a 12.5 magnitude K0 star.
That is three. Got more details? Name of star, distance from our sun, mass of planet, size of planet, distance form planet to parent sun, place in habitable zone, that kind of things? And of course nice artist renderings, please! ;)


Malcolm also showed a few graphs of magnitude versus time to which he simply said ‘God knows what it is'.
Exciting! :D


Malcolm closed explaining that they found a few dozen transits in their first observing session - more than some expected them to find in their entire mission.
When we will know more? A few months? :neutral:

djellison
2007-Aug-26, 05:31 PM
As the piece said - they were intentionally cagey, gave very little detail, and are not going to release anything quickly. Lot's more patience required.

Doug

Kullat Nunu
2007-Aug-26, 05:55 PM
I've heard that it takes at least three months before they publish any results. In order to get good science, the results must be thoroughly examined. Especially if they're found something really interesting.

No more TMR-1Cs, please.

Nor Venus Express style PR, either.

djellison
2007-Aug-26, 06:14 PM
They have these 150 day observing session which they will then follow up with ground based observing - and then they have to sit down and do the science. This is a long term mission that will take a lot of work and time before the science comes out at the far end.

Doug

Doodler
2007-Aug-26, 11:10 PM
No more TMR-1Cs, please.

Credit where its due, TMR-1c was a pretty isolated incident.

Launch window
2007-Oct-04, 03:42 AM
By Doug Ellison (user djellison), actually.


Oops ! my bad
Thanks to djellison for this article

Would I be right in assuming we could hear something from Corot in the next few days ?

Kullat Nunu
2007-Oct-04, 08:26 PM
We may hear about new COROT results in a few weeks (http://spaceurope.blogspot.com/2007/10/with-malcolm-fridlund-missions-project.html).

Launch window
2007-Nov-14, 12:47 AM
COROT: 300 days in orbit
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=24019

It is now clear that CoRoT will instigate a breakthrough in both of the fields of science that it applies to. The scientific impact of CoRoT relies on its three major characteristics never reached before for which the satellite fulfils and surpass its originals specifications:

* the precision with which the satellite is working, which is set by physical laws -- not by the working of the instrument (the data are thus photon noise limited essentially over all magnitude ranges).

* the duration of the observations on the same star

* the continuity of these observations, which have almost no interruption over these very long periods. And CoRoT finds that essentially every star it observes varies.

* CoRoT is discovering exo-planets at a rate only set by the available resources to follow up the detections,

* CoRoT has detected solar type oscillations in solar type stars at a level so far unprecedented apart for observations of our own Sun,

* CoRoT is observing all kinds of activity on a large domain of frequencies from multi-mode oscillations, signature of erratic superficial motions, to the signature of differential rotation as seen by the different periods of the passage of sunspots at different latitudes. This is demonstrated by this example. The data here cover 120 days of uninterrupted observation. It is important to note that what is presented here is raw data (so-called N0 data), and that further refinements will follow shortly.

MaDeR
2007-Nov-14, 08:41 PM
I heard rumors again. Something about annoucement around 10 december. I can't wait, I simply can't waiiiiitttt.... :boohoo:

And...


* CoRoT is discovering exo-planets at a rate only set by the available resources to follow up the detections

That blew me away. :surprised

I eagerly awaits a "My God, it's full of... planets!" moment. :D

Kullat Nunu
2007-Nov-14, 10:34 PM
* CoRoT is discovering exo-planets at a rate only set by the available resources to follow up the detections

That blew me away. :surprised

Sadly, that is a major problem with transit searches. No enough telescope time to do required the follow-up studies.

Launch window
2007-Dec-12, 03:20 AM
We may hear about new COROT results in a few weeks (http://spaceurope.blogspot.com/2007/10/with-malcolm-fridlund-missions-project.html).

any more news on this one ?

Jetlack
2007-Dec-12, 11:49 AM
ESA has a very crappy attitude towards the release of info to the public.

COROT has been in orbit for more than a year and ESA has not provided one piece of solid, evidential data about anything.

We hear rumours about some great find of an earthlike planet. Where is it and where is the data? Sorry but my view is that they are either acting like some Soviet style dictatorship or they have zilch and the COROT project is malfunctioning and they just dont want to announce it because of embarassment.

Thankgod for NASA which at least treats its tax payers with some respect.

My gut feeling is that COROT actually has nothing to tell us of any significance. They have been promising data for months and nothing has been divulged.

Hope im wrong but then it brings to the fore the question as to why they are so tight with info release.

Zachary
2007-Dec-12, 12:35 PM
I agree that the honks that run ESA could do with a few more PR lessons but there's a reason why information is so sparse; it takes an awful lot of time and effort to follow up a detection and then to show it's not just some anomaly. Better late than shouting about finding the first exo-earth only for follow up studies to show it doesn't exist.

Jetlack
2007-Dec-12, 01:03 PM
I agree that the honks that run ESA could do with a few more PR lessons but there's a reason why information is so sparse; it takes an awful lot of time and effort to follow up a detection and then to show it's not just some anomaly. Better late than shouting about finding the first exo-earth only for follow up studies to show it doesn't exist.

Well i think thats a well trodden excuse and it doesnt stop NASA from delivering prelim info to the public and other scientists around the world.

If we assume you are correct and they dont want to get our hopes raised to high then why dont they share some of the lesser data collected..perhaps other massive planets of which there would not be such a controversy.

Surely COROT - if functioning correctly - has received data which they could divulge...just to keep us science punters happy, until they are ready to announce the big one?

There has been zero real data released by COROT. I find that almost unbelievable after a year in project time.

Do remember we as Uk taxpayers are paying for these projects and there is a duty to inform us of their progress when we are paying for it. NASA seems to understand how improtant it is to keep the public onside by releasing info almost as soon as it hits their desktops. I just wish ESA acted with the same transparency.

In fact I wonder how NASA feel about this lack of sharing from ESA because its clearly not reciprocal.

zemig
2007-Dec-12, 04:15 PM
I have good news i have read on spaEurope bloge something that might be interesting...

"Explaining this absence will wait for a future opportunity for now, and much more important than that here are some words to shed some light over the COROT mission.
I've just checked my e-mail and there was one particularly calling my attention coming from...Malcolm Fridlund, COROT's Project Scientist.

After a previous announcement of a press conference to the 10th of this month where results would be released Fridlund reveals that this date has been postponed...but not for long...
We will just have to wait about a week, the upcoming December 20 is the day to stay alert.
According to the mission's happy Project Scientist, there will be in that day's morning, a press conference at the Paris Observatory.
Fridlund also indicates that there will be a simultaneous press release at a time yet to be decided but it will be around noon.

This press event will focus on the release of data to the Co-Investigators that took place yesterday, with the fact that Annie Baglin, COROT's Chief Scientist, has been awarded a french medal, and...drums please...with the first 3 papers that have been already submitted.

Juicy ain't it?
It will worth the wait."

Juicyy i can t wait!:)

zemig
2007-Dec-12, 04:51 PM
There has been zero real data released by COROT. I find that almost unbelievable after a year in project time.


That is not true theret is a planet CoRoT-Exo-1 b wich was detected by COROT it is a big one but it proves that the mission is going well we just need to wait im sure there will be big annoucemets from this mission! maybe next week already...
keep dreaming..

Jetlack
2007-Dec-12, 05:02 PM
I have good news i have read on spaEurope bloge something that might be interesting...

"Explaining this absence will wait for a future opportunity for now, and much more important than that here are some words to shed some light over the COROT mission.
I've just checked my e-mail and there was one particularly calling my attention coming from...Malcolm Fridlund, COROT's Project Scientist.

After a previous announcement of a press conference to the 10th of this month where results would be released Fridlund reveals that this date has been postponed...but not for long...
We will just have to wait about a week, the upcoming December 20 is the day to stay alert.
According to the mission's happy Project Scientist, there will be in that day's morning, a press conference at the Paris Observatory.
Fridlund also indicates that there will be a simultaneous press release at a time yet to be decided but it will be around noon.

This press event will focus on the release of data to the Co-Investigators that took place yesterday, with the fact that Annie Baglin, COROT's Chief Scientist, has been awarded a french medal, and...drums please...with the first 3 papers that have been already submitted.

Juicy ain't it?
It will worth the wait."

Juicyy i can t wait!:)

Well you certainly are talking this one up :-) I hope its a good as you make it sound it will be. Im expecting close ups of alien biology ..hehe only kidding. An earth size planet with oxygen atmosphere would do nicely.

Well this scientist cant be given medals for finding gas giants as there are more than 250 of them already - so its gotta be a rocky right?

Eckelston
2007-Dec-12, 05:32 PM
ESA has a very crappy attitude towards the release of info to the public.

COROT has been in orbit for more than a year and ESA has not provided one piece of solid, evidential data about anything.

We hear rumours about some great find of an earthlike planet. Where is it and where is the data? Sorry but my view is that they are either acting like some Soviet style dictatorship or they have zilch and the COROT project is malfunctioning and they just dont want to announce it because of embarassment.

I prefer silence to this (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/low/science/nature/3856401.stm).

Jetlack
2007-Dec-12, 07:52 PM
I prefer silence to this (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/low/science/nature/3856401.stm).

Gosh yes that would be embarassing :-)

Romanus
2007-Dec-12, 11:11 PM
For once I'm going to defend ESA: I think COROT coverage has been decent, and in line with the typical process of data recovery, analysis, and proprietary period. Added to this is the complication that COROT transits must be confirmed by radial velocity tests before they're considered legit.

Our own HST data belongs to the scientists for a year before it's public, though of course for special or rare events they accelerate that schedule. I've found the COROT results released thus far fascinating, and am *confident* that we'll see *all* the planets COROT nets during its primary mission--once that mission ends, of course. ESA was similarly tight with HIPPARCOS data, yet only three years after mission operations terminated, it was released wholesale. I think COROT will be much the same.

I guess the litmus test for all this will be Kepler (which, barring my own personal darlings, SIM and TPF, is my most eagerly-anticipated mission of the next decade). If Kepler successfully makes its orbit and begins observations, and the data netted is released at a rate significantly higher than COROT's has been, I'll eat my shorts.

Jetlack
2007-Dec-13, 10:43 AM
For once I'm going to defend ESA: I think COROT coverage has been decent, and in line with the typical process of data recovery, analysis, and proprietary period. Added to this is the complication that COROT transits must be confirmed by radial velocity tests before they're considered legit.

Our own HST data belongs to the scientists for a year before it's public, though of course for special or rare events they accelerate that schedule. I've found the COROT results released thus far fascinating, and am *confident* that we'll see *all* the planets COROT nets during its primary mission--once that mission ends, of course. ESA was similarly tight with HIPPARCOS data, yet only three years after mission operations terminated, it was released wholesale. I think COROT will be much the same.

I guess the litmus test for all this will be Kepler (which, barring my own personal darlings, SIM and TPF, is my most eagerly-anticipated mission of the next decade). If Kepler successfully makes its orbit and begins observations, and the data netted is released at a rate significantly higher than COROT's has been, I'll eat my shorts.

Kepler is now slated for a 2009 launch i believe - hopefully it will stay in that slot.

By the way what part of the COROT data so far released is "facinating"?

I dont mean to sound stupid but i havent got a clue. Can you elaborate please?

Romanus
2007-Dec-13, 01:54 PM
^
Namely, the hints that the data haul is enormous, and the released planetary discoveries so far (all right, just one planet, but it was soon after launch) give me reason to be optimistic. The December 20 data release will be most telling, and it will only include the ones that they've managed to follow up with RV confirmation.

Kullat Nunu
2007-Dec-13, 09:29 PM
Firstly, CoRoT is a CNES (French) mission, where ESA is only a partner. It is also a small mission, so their PR resources are limited. Secondly, as others have already said, tt is not enough to see something transiting a star. RV confirmation (which is hard due to lack of available resources) is needed to ensure the object detected is indeed a planet.


By the way what part of the COROT data so far released is "facinating"?

Its incredible accuracy is fascinating. If they really can get as clear singal as is physically possible, the outcome of the mission may be much better than designed and expectde.

zemig
2007-Dec-17, 07:36 PM
Well this scientist cant be given medals for finding gas giants as there are more than 250 of them already - so its gotta be a rocky right?

I hope so! but at the same time i think that if they had found it and sended the papers to peers i thing there should be already some rumours around ... i would be very happy with a planet about 3 terrestrial masses i guess we have to wait more two days one thing is for sure i think that COROT might on is timeframe be the first to detect a terrestrial like planet and that would be essencial results to the development of darwin and tpf missions..

Launch window
2007-Dec-18, 05:10 AM
The Kepler mission, due to launch in 2008, will be a substantial improvement over Corot. I hope Kepler doesn't fall to the ax just like TPF in the next few years.



Kepler is go ! I saw this story a few months back, it looked Kepler faced some bad cuts but everything looks ok now and its scheduled for launch in early 2009

http://www.space.com/spacenews/070716_businessmonday_kepler.html

There's always a chance Corot might get the jump on Kepler for Earth like worlds but Kepler is probably the better telescope for detecting Earth-like planets, Kepler will benefit from the latest NASA technology and is also a bigger scope with a 1.4 meter primary mirror

Eckelston
2007-Dec-18, 05:46 PM
Is the press conference for tomorrow still on track?

zemig
2007-Dec-18, 06:19 PM
The press conference is suposed to be on 20 December on Paris lets hope he dosent get postponed again!

Kullat Nunu
2007-Dec-18, 06:58 PM
I try not to get too excited, as it seems the CoRoT team is releasing only some preliminary results. Certainly they know more than they will reveal, and the spacecraft will no doubt make several major discoveries as the mission progresses.

CoRoT is a very small mission, and uses a method whose effectiveness is directly related to the area and time covered (i.e. more scopes the better). With the price tag of one Kepler mission one can get several such missions. While true Earth analogs are beyond reach, a vast amount of data could be retrieved nonetheless. Including Earth-like planets around red dwarfs.

Jetlack
2007-Dec-20, 09:35 AM
Okay good news!

Apparently this press conferecne will happen today at 11.00am CET. Two hours later the data will be on the ESA website. Cant wait!

http://www.spaceurope.blogspot.com/

Launch window
2007-Dec-20, 12:20 PM
Another typical transiting hot Jupiter

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/COROT/SEMF0C2MDAF_0.html



Although COROT observes thousands of light curves, the pace of discovery is governed by ground-based observations.

:(


A lot of stellar seismology data coming back, oscillations were found in 2 stars that are very like our sun

:)

Kullat Nunu
2007-Dec-20, 12:29 PM
Congratulations to the CoRoT team for surpassing my most pessimistic expectations...

I would have expected them to be bolder than that, they certainly have many more promising candidates. But I can't blame them for not having not enough telescope time to do RV confirmations. The stars are distant and dim, and therefore hard to study.

The wait continues...

Jetlack
2007-Dec-20, 12:40 PM
A little dissapointing - another hot jupiter :-)

Launch window
2007-Dec-20, 12:41 PM
ESA should have put money into building more ground based facilities to support their missions. NASA launches Kepler in 2009, it may be late getting to the exoplanet race but I imagine you will find NASA will have a lot less trouble following up its readings with confirmations from ground based observatories.

Launch window
2007-Dec-20, 12:49 PM
Some interesting info about the regions observed at the end of the article

Corot will be watching a new area in the direction of the 'Unicorn', it will be observing this region for 'at least 150 days'

zemig
2007-Dec-20, 07:51 PM
The most important thing about this press conference wasnt the anouncement of CoRoT-exo-2b according to Rui Borges at Spaceeurope there are " around 40 light curves containing signs of possible planets" on this short time this is a fantastic value, thats like almost all planets that were foud by photometry since the begining if confirmed on ground,(actualy till now by transit method there are only 35 planets found counting already with these two that corot found!) and corot will probably get much more light curves of possible planets till the end of is mission!! other thing stated was "Among these possible exoplanets there are two candidates particularly promising...a planet two times smaller than Saturn and another one of jovian size but with a unusual density..." to me these are fantastic news for the field! About exoearths i think that after this press conference and with the sample analysed till now the inexistence of low masses on the samples might indicate that corot might not be up to the task of detecting teluric planets (of course that a planet two times smaller than Saturn is small one but even so is far from an earth size telluric one).

Kullat Nunu
2007-Dec-20, 09:40 PM
Don't take those 40 as granted, there are several ways stars (and brown dwarfs) can mimic a planetary transit and it is possible that most of them turn out to be false detections (remember the 100 Hubble "planets" which turned out to be 2 confirmed and 14 potential detections)...

There are even more rumours of CoRoT planets, so there indeed are many planet candidates being confirmed. I would have expected the team to reveal more of them today... But if they don't have enough RV measurements of the planets their carefulness is understandable.

One should also remember that the data is only now being analyzed. Both the announced planets are clearly visible in the light curve, but finding transits over dimmer stars and by smaller planets is much more difficult. Let alone to confirm.

If CoRoT's photometry is as accurate as claimed, it should be able to detect Earth-sized planets around relatively near red and orange dwarfs. That means potentially habitable planets. Planets with couple to few Earth radii (giant terrestrials, ocean planets) should be easily detectable.

MaDeR
2007-Dec-21, 11:36 AM
I am disappointed. Only one planet and some general self-praising blablach. Well, what you expect from ESA? ESA is known for its not-so-friendly policy about relasing results to general public.

It will be interesting comparing time of relase from Kepler and reading apogoletic stunts from ESA adherents. ;)

Jetlack
2007-Dec-22, 09:54 AM
I am disappointed. Only one planet and some general self-praising blablach. Well, what you expect from ESA? ESA is known for its not-so-friendly policy about relasing results to general public.

It will be interesting comparing time of relase from Kepler and reading apogoletic stunts from ESA adherents. ;)

Well I am surprised at how the results have been talked up with hyped intensity. We were led to believe some great discoveries had taken place and "medals" had been awarded. Sorry but this smells of European mediocrity rearing its very nasty little head.

Either we are being totally misled by propaganda, or CNES is just being very tight lipped. I would like to think its the latter.

WE were also told that COROT would spot earth sized planets. WE were also told - in one of the few press releases since in 2007 - that COROTs instruments were even more accurate than previously thought.

Another strange thing is look how small the COROT section at ESA is. It should be billed as one of their most interesting missions at the moment but if you look on the homepage its really hard to locate the webpage.

If this was the NASA Kepler mission there would be weekly updates and a blog, hundreds of pages detailing the science and equipment etc....The difference is NASA appears to understand they have to show results to the public to keep their generous funding. We wouldnt be counting on obscure European space blogs for a "rumour" from the supposedly highly "excited Mr Fridlund". This is publicly funded reasearch and the information and findings should be shared with the public and the scientific community. It should not be treated like some big secret.

When i complained about this lack of transparency before someone gave me a link to the erroneous Hubble announcement about 100 planets being found. Ya, that was a mistake but i prefer an honest and overtly eager PR mistake than being miseld purposefully in regards to a publicly funded project.

Kullat Nunu
2007-Dec-22, 05:47 PM
Either we are being totally misled by propaganda, or CNES is just being very tight lipped. I would like to think its the latter.

Remember that the CoRoT team hadn't told anything publicly before the news release. Everything was just rumours, and if we got hyped, it's our fault. Though I hoped that they would have revealed more planets as it seems they have more of them confirmed.


WE were also told that COROT would spot earth sized planets. WE were also told - in one of the few press releases since in 2007 - that COROTs instruments were even more accurate than previously thought.

The nominal accuracy wouldn't have been enough to spot Earth-sized planets. They're just started to analyse the data and signals of smaller planets certainly are not easy to detect. CoRoT-Exo-1b and CoRoT-Exo-2b both are very large planets that orbit relatively bright stars smaller than the Sun, so they were very easy to detect.

I'm confident they will make one or several major discoveries, but it'll take time.


Another strange thing is look how small the COROT section at ESA is. It should be billed as one of their most interesting missions at the moment but if you look on the homepage its really hard to locate the webpage.

CoRoT is an CNET (French) mission where ESA is only a partner. And it is actually really small mission with a tiny spacecraft.


If this was the NASA Kepler mission there would be weekly updates and a blog, hundreds of pages detailing the science and equipment etc....The difference is NASA appears to understand they have to show results to the public to keep their generous funding. We wouldnt be counting on obscure European space blogs for a "rumour" from the supposedly highly "excited Mr Fridlund". This is publicly funded reasearch and the information and findings should be shared with the public and the scientific community. It should not be treated like some big secret.

Kepler is far larger mission conducted by an agency that has long experience on PR. It was also very close of being cancelled. ESA had similar project, Eddington, that wasn't as lucky. Stupid, if you ask me because this kind of missions should be relatively easy to do and they produce vast amounts of important data (not just about planets).


When i complained about this lack of transparency before someone gave me a link to the erroneous Hubble announcement about 100 planets being found. Ya, that was a mistake but i prefer an honest and overtly eager PR mistake than being miseld purposefully in regards to a publicly funded project.

This is good example why major discoveries must not be released too hastily.

ngc3314
2007-Dec-22, 09:17 PM
ESA should have put money into building more ground based facilities to support their missions. NASA launches Kepler in 2009, it may be late getting to the exoplanet race but I imagine you will find NASA will have a lot less trouble following up its readings with confirmations from ground based observatories.

Detail - neither NASA nor ESA has been in the business of building ground-based telescopes (with one-off exceptions like the NASA 3m IR telescope at Mauna Kea and the ESA optical station on Tenerife). Now ESO has put a while lot of money into ground-based facilities, some of which have suitable high-precision radial-velocity instruments for followup. In fact, it's commonly thought that European astionomers would be better placed for ground-based followup than their US counterparts unless those counterparts all work in California, Hawaii, Arizona, or Texas...

Two kinds of data can act to confirm - the usual reflex Doppler cycles, and, since we already know these objects are transiting, the Rossiter-Mclaughlin effect. This is the change in a star's mean Doppler shift produced as a dimmer companion blocks various parts of is rotating surface, and in some transiting hot Jupiters, has has a wavelength amplitude considerably larger than the reflex motion. Plus one need only observe during the transit window. The amplitude tells you something about relative sizes of star and planet (dpeening on how well the star's rotational velocity is known from high-dispersion spectra, no picnic for solar-type stars), although getting th emass independently takes full orbital coverage.

Jetlack
2007-Dec-23, 11:05 AM
Kullat Nunu,

The fact is the pre-hype was misleading. And I appreciate ESA was a smallish partner but it did give funding for the French project. But it matters little because its not as if the French public got some kind of advance data. My point is about the relative stinginess from European publicly funded space projects.

"THE MISSION:
Astronomers from ESA's Member States are taking part in a French led mission, the first to search for rocky planets around other stars. The mission, COROT, is an important stepping stone in the European effort to find habitable, Earth-like planets around other stars."

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/area/index.cfm?fareaid=39

Now we are told that it cant find rocky planets. This is just one example of misleading information regarding COROT, and the recent leaks provided by Mr Fridlund to Space blogs have been very exaggerated accounts.

MaDeR
2007-Dec-23, 02:41 PM
Remember that the CoRoT team hadn't told anything publicly before the news release. Everything was just rumours, and if we got hyped, it's our fault.
Who hyped this (http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/oct2007.htm)? Or this (http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/PremObsCorot_en.pdf)? Or another (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/COROT/SEMF0C2MDAF_0.html) laughable hype (surprises? what surprises? that they found yet another hot jupiter?)... Santa claus? And don't tell me these links are not public statements from CoRoT team or ESA.

For 10 months only two planets - all fairly typical hot jupiters. Maybe it would be worthwhile news in 1997, but not in 2007.

Face it: for now CoRoT team are only hot air, misleading statements, a lot of hype, teasers, promises of wonderous preformace and almost no results.

If you will start talking about how hard is proofing results, then you must admit that ESA and CoRoT team should shut up about their misleading hype.

Kullat Nunu
2007-Dec-23, 06:07 PM
Who hyped this (http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/oct2007.htm)? Or this (http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/PremObsCorot_en.pdf)? Or another ("http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/COROT/SEMF0C2MDAF_0.html) laughable hype (surprises? what surprises? that they found yet another hot jupiter?)... Santa claus? And don't tell me these links are not public statements from CoRoT team or ESA.

Neither of the two pre-meeting press releases mention what they were going to tell in the meeting. The first press release tells that they're achieved extraordinary precision and are finding planets, the second one about the first planet. I, you and everyone else expected they would have released more based on rumours. The third press release has the most hype because of "surprising results".

If you've read the spacEurope blog, someone told that they were going to publish a dozen or so planets. One more or less ordinary hot Jupiter was a disappointment and a PR plunder. They have more planets, but they're not going to tell us yet.


If you will start talking about how hard is proofing results, then you must admit that ESA and CoRoT team should shut up about their misleading hype.

If you mean talking about "surprising" results, then I agree. But on the other hand I don't want to hear about "a hundred new planets" when they haven't yet been confirmed.

Kullat Nunu
2007-Dec-23, 06:17 PM
Now we are told that it cant find rocky planets. This is just one example of misleading information regarding COROT, and the recent leaks provided by Mr Fridlund to Space blogs have been very exaggerated accounts.

Who has told it can't? If the precision is what has been claimed, it should be able to do that. Not true Earth analogues, but terrestrial planets.

However, finding them needs a very careful analysis of tens of thousands of light curves. The drop of brightness is minuscule. Confirming the candidates is the more difficult part and that isn't CoRoT's fault.

Eckelston
2007-Dec-24, 01:06 AM
I think most of us agree that events which have no RV followup should not be released. They are working on it. No point in saying that they probably maybe found a planet and they'll get back to us when they are sure.

It's also possible they held back on some confirmed planets too. They might have found hints of other planets in those systems and wanted to do a more thorough study before telling about them. I wish they wouldn't do that but it's certainly their right.

Jetlack
2007-Dec-24, 10:13 AM
I think most of us agree that events which have no RV followup should not be released. They are working on it. No point in saying that they probably maybe found a planet and they'll get back to us when they are sure.

It's also possible they held back on some confirmed planets too. They might have found hints of other planets in those systems and wanted to do a more thorough study before telling about them. I wish they wouldn't do that but it's certainly their right.

All very reasonable and kind of you to give them the benefit of the doubt.

My problem is ESA/CNET press releases, promising major discoveries, and surprises.

I always suspected there was something wrong with this mission because since it launched they have made 3 press releases in total. But members of this board and others told me not to worry - everything was going great and there would be major announcements etc...

I would like to have ben proved wrong but so far the science results are very dissapointing and i can only hope they are being selfish with the data or dont want to share.

What will really infuriate me is if we have been led along just in order to save blushes fromthe COROT team.

Kullat Nunu,

Look you are obviously French or European and want to believe the best. Im European also and would love to have seen COROT do great but im not going to fool myself.

Kullat Nunu
2007-Dec-24, 09:04 PM
My problem is ESA/CNET press releases, promising major discoveries, and surprises.

1) They have a very good probe, as the few lightcurves published demonstrate.
2) They are only now starting to study the data (which needs a lot of work) to find interesting objects.

So you think they shouldn't promise major discoveries or surprises? They haven't revealed all they know.


I always suspected there was something wrong with this mission because since it launched they have made 3 press releases in total. But members of this board and others told me not to worry - everything was going great and there would be major announcements etc...

You are obviously not familiar with the ESA's way to make PR. :rolleyes: Did you know we have had a probe orbiting Venus since April, 2006? They have released only a few images during the entire mission so far. About one image in every few months.


I would like to have ben proved wrong but so far the science results are very dissapointing and i can only hope they are being selfish with the data or dont want to share.

Do you think they should release it immediately without studying it first? Do you think it is fair if someone else who has done nothing for the mission makes a major discovery because of that? I think it is fair that the project scientists who have spend several years preparing the mission have the right to study the data first. A timespan from 6 months to a year at most is fine in my opinion. After that, everything should be made public. That's the way NASA works (and kudos to the MER and Cassini imaging teams who have the courage to publish their raw images immediately!)


What will really infuriate me is if we have been led along just in order to save blushes fromthe COROT team.

I don't think they would have been so optimistic if that was the case.


Look you are obviously French or European and want to believe the best. Im European also and would love to have seen COROT do great but im not going to fool myself.

I'm European (not French) but that doesn't mean anything. Generally I'm very disappointed in ESA's press relations abilities (been spoiled by NASA...), but remember the two organizations operate differently and they have different amounts of resources and experience. As I've said several times already, I'm disappointed about the press meeting (my most pessimistic guess was a handful of hot Jupiters, not just one).

Kullat Nunu
2007-Dec-24, 10:27 PM
1) They have a very good probe, as the few lightcurves published demonstrate.
2) They are only now starting to study the data (which needs a lot of work) to find interesting objects.

3) CoRoT is the first mission of its kind. A real surprise would be that it doesn't find surprises (I mean real surprises).

Kullat Nunu
2007-Dec-25, 12:30 AM
An interesting post (http://oklo.org/?p=263) on the systemic blog. Since the planets discovered by space-based telescopes orbit much dimmer stars, their scientific value tend to be much less compared to the planets discovered by ground-based surveys which are much easier to study.

Nothing new here, actually. Hubble's scientific output/dollar ratio is much worser compared to ground-based telescopes (the SWEEPS survey cost $6M!) On the other hand, there's things that can't be done well on the ground such as detecting small planets. If CoRoT is only able to find hot Jupiters, it is hardly worth the money (at least transit survey-wise, its second and originally the only one mission was to study stellar oscillations).

Eckelston
2007-Dec-25, 10:07 PM
Jetlack, there are two issues here, that we should separate.

The first is how well the satellite is working. Scientists working on the mission have repeatadly said that it's working better than expected with better accuracy, no unexpected systematics. They've said this in press releases multiple times, also in blogs and apparently in personal communications in conferences. I see absolutely no reason to doubt this.

The other issue is PR and releasing data and results. As others have said what they are doing is not unusual. Some (but as I understand not all) NASA missions have generous PR budgets and so do a pretty good job of communicating their findings to the public. Some missions even release their raw data immediately though this is definitely the exception.

I can understand your frustration at not seeing the results yet. I actually feel the same way. But that doesn't mean (or even suggest) there's something wrong with the mission. Actually the complete opposite seems to be true.
So no need to spread misinformation just because you're annoyed at the scientists.

frankuitaalst
2008-Feb-13, 09:25 PM
Someone here has any idea when the new results of Corot will be announced ? ( I have in mind they were announced to come about now ) .

ToSeek
2008-May-23, 05:52 PM
ESA COROT: Exoplanet Hunt Update (http://www.astrobiology.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=25484)


Two new exoplanets and an unknown celestial object are the latest findings of the COROT mission. These discoveries mean that the mission has now found a total of four new exoplanets.

These results were presented this week at the IAU symposium 253 in Massachusetts, USA.

COROT has now been operating for 510 days, and the mission started observations of its sixth star field at the beginning of May this year. During this observation phase, which will last 5 months, the spacecraft will simultaneously observe 12 000 stars.

The two new planets are gas giants of the hot Jupiter type, which orbit very close to their parent star and tend to have extensive atmospheres because heat from the nearby star gives them energy to expand.

In addition, an oddity dubbed 'COROT-exo-3b' has raised particular interest among astronomers. It appears to be something between a brown dwarf, a sub-stellar object without nuclear fusion at its core but with some stellar characteristics, and a planet. Its radius is too small for it to be a super-planet.

Launch window
2008-Jul-26, 02:07 AM
COROT finds exoplanet orbiting Sun-like star

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMSIFXIPIF_index_0.html


A team of European scientists working with COROT have discovered an exoplanet orbiting a star slightly more massive than the Sun. After just 555 days in orbit, the mission has now observed more than 50 000 stars and is adding significantly to our knowledge of the fundamental workings of stars.

The latest discovery, COROT-exo-4b is an exoplanet of about the same size as Jupiter. It takes 9.2 days to orbit its star, the longest period for any transiting exoplanet ever found.

The team has found that the star, which is slightly larger than our Sun, is rotating at the same pace as the planet's period of revolution. This is quite a surprise for the team, as the planet is thought to be too low in mass and too distant from its star, for the star to have any major influence on its rotation.