PDA

View Full Version : Stand an egg on Spring Equinox



spacedad2
2006-Mar-05, 02:30 PM
Instead of waiting for after the spring equinox, and all the news reporters and weatherpersons to run stories about standing an egg on end on the equinox, launch a preemptive effort, to derail any such nonsense before it starts.

It is preeminently important to have news and weather reports present real science and real truths, rather than promote myths and fantasy. We as a people must make intelligent decisions about science issues across the board, from genetic engineering of foods, to pesticide use, to nuclear power development, to whether global warming is a real danger, or whether killer asteroids are a real danger, to bird flu, to our daily use of washcloths and household water, and whether to use regular soap, or bactericide soap, which can enhance the development of super germs. If we continue to allow news reports and weatherstaff to promote mythology such as the stand an egg on its end during the equinox, how can we expect people in general to understand other scientific issues? We can not continue to countenance the dissemination of irrational falsehoods, especially in news reports and weather reports.

Call and write to the news directors, and weatherpersons at your local, regional and national news organizations - both radio, and television, and implore them to NOT run any stories about standing an egg on its end on the equinox.

Explain how it is important for the future of the country that our population understand real science. Explain how it is possible to stand an egg on its end on ANY day of the year, at any time, and it is possible for anyone to prove that to themselves with any sturdy table and any egg, at any time. If they want to run a stand an egg on its end story anyway, have them do it on some other day, just to prove it is possible at any time. Refer to this website. But please, implore them to not continue to promote falsehoods and mythology in the name of news.

Please write and call your news reporters and directors this week. The spring eqinox is only a few weeks away, and already news directors are planning egg standing stories, so act quickly and maybe we can nip this in the bud.

Melusine
2006-Mar-05, 09:25 PM
Excellent post, Spacedad, and welcome to BAUT. In a way you are "preaching to the choir" here, but people cannot be reminded too much that debunking all these falsehoods, urban legends, myths, etc. need to be dealt with on a daily basis that reaches people on a mass level...TV.

Personally, what I do in my little niche of the world is use email. I work with regular folk, some of who are fascinated by ghosts and such, and am barraged with emails that are falsehoods and old urban legends. I've taken to hitting "reply all" and using Snopes to counter some of the pervasive falsehoods that circulate; those who do not BCC (blind copy) give me the satisfaction of knowing that my responses are going back to many people. I am becoming a bit of a "wet rag" spoiling their fun, but what I do is turn around and send out real photos, say of that hilarious penguin hopping into the water, or something of interest that is real, enjoyable or medically useful. Some people say, "Thank you, so glad I didn't buy that star," so it's just my small way of doing what I can, but it's never enough. Good shows like Mythbusters, et al, are great, but it's still not enough. I work with two people who don't have cable and don't read books, and so don't have exposure to Mythbusters and the like.

:)

aries_4_5_48
2006-Mar-17, 05:48 AM
...does that mean no more Ground Hog Day, Valentine's Day, or Christmas Day? The number 7 isn't really a lucky number, no more making a wish and blowing out the candles on your birthday cake, or putting your tooth under your pillow for the Tooth Fairy, no more lunacy on full moon nights? It might make it a better world, but not near as interesting. Remove all the spice, and bland is what you get...

Melusine
2006-Mar-17, 01:54 PM
...does that mean no more Ground Hog Day, Valentine's Day, or Christmas Day? The number 7 isn't really a lucky number, no more making a wish and blowing out the candles on your birthday cake, or putting your tooth under your pillow for the Tooth Fairy, no more lunacy on full moon nights? It might make it a better world, but not near as interesting. Remove all the spice, and bland is what you get...
You're implying that without these customs, such as the Tooth Fairy, that life would be dull in some way. But don't forget, many of our customs, such as Christmas trees and such, were based on pagan celebrations related to nature...harvest, changing of seasons, etc. You think life would be bland without Santa Claus? My mother said I was fascinated with animals and stars at 4 years old. Maybe it was fun for kids' imaginations, but what purpose does it serve to herald the balancing of eggs on one day when one can balance them on 365 days?

We study and learn about the history of myths and their place in human history/development; we can appreciate them, but to perpetuate them as fact because they're fun is like keeping a child in a perpetual state of intellectual immaturity. Simply know what's fact and fiction. BTW, my co-worker is a Jehovah Witness and does not celebrate any of the customs you mention above - she would resent that you'd consider her child's life as bland. There's ALOT to make life interesting. :)

hhEb09'1
2006-Mar-17, 02:00 PM
We study and learn about the history of myths and their place in human history/development; we can appreciate them, but to perpetuate them as fact because they're fun is like keeping a child in a perpetual state of intellectual immaturity. Simply know what's fact and fiction.One of the best reasons for continuing these traditions is that eventually the child wises up and realizes that people who were trusted were not telling the truth. That's one of the most important lessons of science--question authority.

Melusine
2006-Mar-17, 03:15 PM
One of the best reasons for continuing these traditions is that eventually the child wises up and realizes that people who were trusted were not telling the truth. That's one of the most important lessons of science--question authority.
I somewhat agree with you, but I think these things are more about customs and community celebrations that bind people together. I know some home-schooler parents who refused to tell their kids the Santa myth, because they didn't want lie to them. I do not totally agree with that, but understand their purpose, because when I discovered Santa was not real, I resented being lied to. My mother had to painstakingly explain customs/myths. Is that a necessary tool to learn to question authority? There's a difference between being lied to about Santa or egg-balancing (which is such an old myth) than believing so-and-so scientist hypothesizes that that the universe was created by the Big Bang. If the lesson is don't believe everything you're told, it's a roundabout way of going about it...feed the myth, then correct it. :think:


Customs like the Tooth Fairy, for e.g. are short-lived in most kids' lives, but I'd kind of play the game because I got money under my pillow. But, if I had a child, I could see creating our own family customs with a similar reward-system. Perhaps, I could celebrate "solar eclipse days": say when a partial eclipse occurs, you get $5, a total eclipse $10, and so on. Boy, that kid would be on the computer calculating every solar eclipse for the next decade! Would it help the child's development to first propagate a myth about solar eclipses or just explain things such as that at one time people thought the sun revolved around us and now we know that's not true? Gee, science is not static if one keeps an open mind. :)

Gillianren
2006-Mar-17, 07:32 PM
I've a friend whose mother never lied to her about Santa Claus. She did, however, caution my friend that some parents did, and she shouldn't rat 'em out to their kids. (Actually, her mom had a pretty cool explanation for the whole Santa Claus thing that I plan to use on my kids.) And since I grew up Catholic, I learned about Saint Nicholas (whose feast day is my own birthday) at a very early age.

I really don't see how egg-balancing fits into "the wonder of childhood." I, for one, had never heard of it until I read Phil's book the first time, but I would argue that I had a childhood at least as full of wonder as those around me, and probably more so--I retained an imagination at the age when my classmates had developed Nintendo skills instead.

tony873004
2006-Mar-18, 03:12 AM
I've never heard a news report saying you could balance an egg on the equinox. I've never spoken to anyone who believes this can be done either.

In fact, the only time I've ever heard anything about equinox egg balancing is when people debunk it, as in this thread. A google for "egg balancing equinox" only provides me with websites debunking it, an no websites claiming that the equinox has some special powers that allow you to balance an egg. I didn't venture onto page 2 of the search results.

I don't exactly live a sheltered life. I watch and read a lot of news, and I've lived through 80 equinoxes, so why have I never heard of this egg balancing trick, except from the people wishing to debunk it? Maybe Bay Area media just isn't interested.

Melusine
2006-Mar-18, 03:15 PM
I've never heard a news report saying you could balance an egg on the equinox. I've never spoken to anyone who believes this can be done either.

In fact, the only time I've ever heard anything about equinox egg balancing is when people debunk it, as in this thread. A google for "egg balancing equinox" only provides me with websites debunking it, an no websites claiming that the equinox has some special powers that allow you to balance an egg. I didn't venture onto page 2 of the search results.

I agree with you that I don't see major media on the web promoting Equinox egg-balancing, but if you had looked into the thousands of hits you would have found, 1) people still asking if it is true, and 2) people still saying you can do it on the Equinox, but not mentioning every other day that you can. This is a good sign--that the Internet helps in debunking and that word has spread around that it's absolutely false. In my deeper search I read one page that referred to an AP article about it in 2000, so alot of this first-page-Google debunking isn't that new.

I see that it is mainly astrology, religious and "new-agey" sites that most recently comment on this balancing business. These are a few of many:

2000
http://www.worldtrek.org/odyssey/mideast/040100/040100kavinoruz.html

Kids site (rolls eyes).
http://www.sciensational.com/physics.php

Astrology Sept 2005.
http://www.astrologers-online.com/SkyWatch/sept_2005.html

Some dude who has read Briane Greene's book but still sneaks to the fridge on March 20th.
Safe blog (http://sandyhamilton.blogs.com/sandy_hamilton/2005/03/thank_god_lent_.html)

A nutritional site that mentions it while they're recommending eating eggs.
http://www.benefitsofjuice.com/20708.php

An informative 2004 BBC article that mentions Phil Plait (aka BA) as one source.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A2181377


Personally, I never encountered this myth either. My family has an Easter custom of breaking eachother's hardboiled eggs, and the one who has an uncracked end wins...alot of hardboiled eggs, lol. I think one would have to be in some serious denial or sheltered to believe this--but some legends die hard.

But, I'll tell you some urban legends I STILL hear of all the time--the biggest one being about pulling grey hairs. "No don't pull them, more will grow in its place!" I hear this so often it's mind boggling.
Discussed at Snopes: http://www.snopes.com/oldwives/hairgrow.asp

The Bad Astronomer
2006-Mar-18, 08:23 PM
This legend was very popular just a few years ago, but I have noticed it appears to be on the decline. I have been aggressively attacking it for years, so it makes me wonder if I've had an effect, or is it just coincidence?

Astronaught
2006-Mar-19, 05:40 PM
My family has an Easter custom of breaking eachother's hardboiled eggs, and the one who has an uncracked end wins

Which end, the head or... the other end?

I'm confused as to why someone would think that getting over these superstitions would mean that we couldn't have Groundhog Day any more. Just because we don't think the groundhog can predict the weather, does that mean we can't keep one as a pet, take it out one day a year, have a little party, and then all retire to the pub for a couple of cold ones?

I'm even more perplexed as to why someone would point out, in this context, that some current traditions like Christmas trees (and, a more seasonable example, Easter bunnies) are pre-Christian pagan symbols. While this may be true, are the pagans supposed to have been some scientific paragons of rationality and enlightenment?

By the by, for those of you who don't know the recommended method for balancing an egg on one end, here it is: secrete in the palm of your hand some grains of salt. Bet a friend that he can't stand an egg on end, and that you can. Surreptitiously sprinkle a few grains of salt on the table as you prepare to place the egg. (It may help to dampen the end of the egg so that the salt will adhere to it.) You should be able to balance the egg pretty easily. Your friend won't have as much luck with his.

You can do this any day of the year, but the sucker may be a little less tight with his purse strings on the vernal equinox, owing to the legend. Place any winnings in the bank, where they will earn enough interest to allow you to buy a round of drinks on the following February 2 when the large rodent of the marmot family, Marmota monax, comes out of his burrow. If I happen to be there, you can buy me a drink. I'll have a Guinness.

(Never bet more than you can afford to lose, nor bet so much with a friend that you risk losing that friend. The salt in this trick is a bigger, better version of the bumps on eggs mentioned in the BA articles on egg balancing.)

Melusine
2006-Mar-19, 08:48 PM
Which end, the head or... the other end?

Welcome! Pointy end to the other person's pointy end; the rounder end to the other person's end--a light tap. Some ends don't crack. They are colored eggs, too.



I'm confused as to why someone would think that getting over these superstitions would mean that we couldn't have Groundhog Day any more. Just because we don't think the groundhog can predict the weather, does that mean we can't keep one as a pet, take it out one day a year, have a little party, and then all retire to the pub for a couple of cold ones?

I agree.



I'm even more perplexed as to why someone would point out, in this context, that some current traditions like Christmas trees (and, a more seasonable example, Easter bunnies) are pre-Christian pagan symbols. While this may be true, are the pagans supposed to have been some scientific paragons of rationality and enlightenment?

No, pagans are no paragons of rationality; Aries said, "does that mean no more Ground Hog Day, Valentine's Day, or Christmas Day?" He is saying life would be lacking spice without these holidays, but pagans were celebrating all sorts of nature-related things around these times, as other people, and life doesn't become dull just because you separate fact from fiction. I have no problem with hauling out the groundhog, though I'm not sure he likes it.



By the by, for those of you who don't know the recommended method for balancing an egg on one end, here it is: secrete in the palm of your hand some grains of salt.

That's called cheating, lol. It works fine the honest way once you get in the flow of it. Or you can do what Lance did--frighten them until they stand up!

http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=19338

HenrikOlsen
2006-Mar-21, 10:34 AM
There's a difference between customs based in traditional celebration of parts of the year and customs used to teach science that is just plain wrong.

Balancing eggs on the spring equinox is just as valid a way of celebrating spring as standing in the snow with friends at sunset, eating roasted horsemeat and drinking immeasurable amounts of mead.
I prefer the latter but that's probably just me.:)

Using the eggbalancing to sprout gibberish about gravitational forces lining up is not and should be stopped.

Swift
2006-Mar-21, 01:52 PM
Spaceweather.com (http://www.spaceweather.com/) has a bit today about egg balancing (slow day for auroras ;) ). They do say it is nonsense and have a funny picture of eggs balanced in the snow. There is also a link to a BBC.com (http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A2181377) website about the folklore.

Melusine
2006-Mar-21, 05:14 PM
Spaceweather.com (http://www.spaceweather.com/) has a bit today about egg balancing (slow day for auroras ;) ). They do say it is nonsense and have a funny picture of eggs balanced in the snow. There is also a link to a BBC.com (http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A2181377) website about the folklore.

Thank you Swift, you confirmed my "cat point" in the other egg-thread--they think they are curious toys. However, those eggs might still smell like chickens, too. That's funny. I'm wondering if he Photoshopped it, because the cat's licking his lips seems too lucky. I saved it anyway. :lol:

Henrik:
Balancing eggs on the spring equinox is just as valid a way of celebrating spring as standing in the snow with friends at sunset, eating roasted horsemeat and drinking immeasurable amounts of mead.
I prefer the latter but that's probably just me

I agree, the point is just knowing what is what. I don't think you can drink mead and balance eggs at the same time. By today's standards, mead is pretty gross. Drink too much of it and you'd be seeing monsters eating people, too. ;)

Gillianren
2006-Mar-21, 07:45 PM
Heck, at my Ostara party this evening, we'll be dyeing eggs. We may or may not try balancing them--I really don't want to clean up egg mess if anyone screws up too badly--but hand-in-hand with the fun will go the history. (To explain to the non-Pagans why Pagans can and do dye eggs, too. Or first, possibly, depending on who you believe.)

Melusine
2006-Mar-21, 08:53 PM
You seem to have a bunch fun theme-parties. [:D envy]

I know a cool egg trick that involves physics. My boss taught it to me, and I got it to work on my first try. However, if you fail, it will be messy. I'll have to try to draw what it should look in my Photo Suite "thingy."

Well, we explain Greek myths here, so what's the deal with the egg-dyeing Pagans?

Gillianren
2006-Mar-22, 01:37 AM
Well, if you didn't live so dang far away, you could come, too! (Ten a year--eight Pagan holidays, my birthday, and the Oscars.) If you're ever in Washington at the right time, drop me a PM.

Well, the question of whether or not egg-dyeing is Pagan or not is still in dispute (stupid non-literate cultures, not writing stuff down), but the reason the egg is a symbol of Easter is from the Germanic goddess--wait for it--Ostara (or Eastre, or about six other spellings; see note above about non-literate cultures). This is Her feast, and She's a fertility goddess. Hence eggs and rabbits and things.

Melusine
2006-Mar-22, 03:54 AM
Well, if you didn't live so dang far away, you could come, too! (Ten a year--eight Pagan holidays, my birthday, and the Oscars.) If you're ever in Washington at the right time, drop me a PM.
Thanks, when I get the winning lottery ticket I never buy, I'll have to fly around and haunt people. Hey, you would have enjoyed me rooting for the penguins (not The Penguins). The Oscars is the only award show I watch.


This is Her feast, and She's a fertility goddess. Hence eggs and rabbits and things.
...and she is apparently very good at this fertility business. ;)

OK, here's the egg trick:

Gather these items together:

A traditional corn broom that has fairly stiff bristles. (http://www.fullercommercial.com/images/Hardgoods/Brooms/6424_6436_6CT-024_CORN_BROOM_72ppi.jpg)

An aluminum pie plate (the disposable cheap kind). (http://www.ncsu.edu/kenan/fellows/2002/pligon/images/MilkLabPharm2.jpg) But don't be doing this psychedelic paint stuff in it.

A glass tumbler like this one in the picture. (http://www.harrythehirer.com.au/Ordering/images/large/glass_tumbler.gif) A diameter of 3 1/4 in. and a height of 4 in. is what worked for me.

You have to make tube like this. (http://www.dinf.ne.jp/doc/english/global/david/dwe002/dwe002g/dwe00251g76.gif)I just cut some thin cardboard from a toilet paper roll, rolled it and taped it. Length 2 1/2 in. and diameter 7/8 of an inch.

So, 1) you put your glass full of water close to the edge of a table, 2) put the pie plate over the glass, 3) stand your little tube up in the center of the plate, 4) and then put a raw egg standing on the tube.

The objective is to bet someone that you can get the egg in the glass of water without it breaking.

You bend the broom bristles, (edit: keep a foot on the bent bristles) let the broom handle go and spring toward the pie plate hitting it's edge (this is a quick snap action), thereby sending it flying, and the egg drops in the glass of water. If all goes well.

Here is a CRUDE picture I drew of what it should look like. (Don't laugh--I wasn't trying to be Da Vinci here.)

http://img91.imageshack.us/img91/8208/eggtrick9ml.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

If you don't succeed you make everyone omelets! :)

publiusr
2006-Mar-24, 09:30 PM
If I hear any more on eggs I'm going to pull what's left of my hair out.

Melusine
2006-Mar-25, 06:07 AM
If I hear any more on eggs I'm going to pull what's left of my hair out.
Maybe you should do what this dude does. (http://mouser.org/gallery/albums/zia200403/IMG_0854.sized.jpg)

Think it's a joke? Nope. (http://mouser.org/gallery/zia200403) :D

publiusr
2006-Mar-30, 08:46 PM
Nice model rockets.

Melusine
2006-Apr-01, 03:44 AM
I thought you might like that. Yeah, that guy has very cool rockets. All I have are a couple of pictures of my rockets. I was 16 when this was taken with one of those 110 film Instamatic cameras (soon after that picture I got a proper 35mm SLR for Xmas). So, all I have is exhaust, lol. It cracks me up, because did I really expect to capture it with THAT camera? Lol. I have another one of it parachuting down with people chasing it. My big, red rocket I overloaded with two D engines on a too-windy day, and it was never seen again...physics not being one of my strong points. :doh:
Walgreens still sells 110 film. BTW, I love the sound of Estes rockets taking off.

http://img475.imageshack.us/img475/5086/scan003000302ob.th.jpg (http://img475.imageshack.us/my.php?image=scan003000302ob.jpg)

I'm tired of eggs, too, but...



This legend was very popular just a few years ago, but I have noticed it appears to be on the decline. I have been aggressively attacking it for years, so it makes me wonder if I've had an effect, or is it just coincidence?

No coincidence, I'm sure. I only started using the Internet around 1998, and not at home until 2001. Forget Google for a moment--Yahoo is older--and if you plug in "egg Equinox" your site comes up first. If someone is going to write an article or do a news piece--well they have their fact finders--and your site would come up first. "They'd think, oohh, this guy's a Phd, he has pictures...I better not sound like a fool..." In the same way awesome tornado pictures have been passed around the world being falsely attributed to a variety of countries (Argos got one from someone saying they were from Brazil, I got them saying they were in East Texas, when they were taken in Nebraska), good information goes around over the Internet as well.

The article I posted was from 2001, and they seemed to think it was still an issue then, too. Lets hope that for the most part, this myth is becoming eggstinct. :doh:

cjl
2006-Apr-09, 05:50 AM
Nice pictures. That black brant X is incredible - I wonder what motor it flew on (I366 redline?). By the way, depending on where you are in Texas, there is a VERY large launch going on in (well, near) Amarillo this July. If you enjoy rockets, you'd love it.

On the topic of eggs - I have never met someone who seriously believes in the myth. Oh - and the egg-broom-pie tin trick is fun :D I failed MISERABLY once (don't ask), but after that one time, I've gotten it every time. People are amazed when I show them :)

Melusine
2006-Apr-09, 07:11 AM
Nice pictures. That black brant X is incredible - I wonder what motor it flew on (I366 redline?). By the way, depending on where you are in Texas, there is a VERY large launch going on in (well, near) Amarillo this July. If you enjoy rockets, you'd love it.

On the topic of eggs - I have never met someone who seriously believes in the myth. Oh - and the egg-broom-pie tin trick is fun :D I failed MISERABLY once (don't ask), but after that one time, I've gotten it every time. People are amazed when I show them :)
Yeah, those are some pretty serious toy rockets that guy has. Amarillo is too far! Actually, every August at the Ballunar Festival (hot-air balloons) over next to NASA/JSC they also have people launching their rockets--a contest of sorts. I haven't built an Estes rocket since the time of my picture above. I recall that I enjoyed putting the launch pad together and painting the rocket...and then watching my boyfriend go fetch it (I didn't include that picture.) :razz:

I think it's more fun to launch one's own rocket than watch others; I have to be involved, don't you think? I could see strapping a Barbie Doll (or some other doll ;) ) to one of those big ones and seeing how it survives. That guy appears to have a sense of humor. Cjl, so, how many rockets do you have? Do you belong to a club?

The egg trick is a splash--literally. :razz: <---goofy face

cjl
2006-Apr-09, 01:35 PM
I have about 15, including a 4 inch daimeter black brant X, with dual deployment (it's the rocket in my avatar, it is now painted, and looks exactly like this one since I painted it: http://mouser.org/gallery/zia200403/DrewBlackBrant ). The launch in Amarillo is a VERY serious launch, with rockets weighing from 1/2 ounce to 800 lbs. They also have a 50000 foot FAA waiver to launch them. It's one of the two largest launches (nationally) held every year, and this year it's in amarillo. I'm going to it this year, and I can't wait.

Oh - and I'm a member of Northern Colorado Rocketry, www.ncrocketry.org

tadowe
2006-Apr-10, 08:20 AM
Hot and cold running dark matter is science, while the rest of any Newtonian imagery is the "bunk!"

Tempel1 is "gushing water" and that's why the x-ray energy is so OBVIOUSLY present and has been since the "unexpected" gigantic explosion which has "confused science."

You guys are a riot!

Halcyon Dayz
2006-Apr-11, 02:12 AM
Are you sure you are in the right thread? :doh:

Read this. (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=32864)

Melusine
2006-Apr-21, 10:40 PM
I agree with you that I don't see major media on the web promoting Equinox egg-balancing, but if you had looked into the thousands of hits you would have found, 1) people still asking if it is true, and 2) people still saying you can do it on the Equinox, but not mentioning every other day that you can. This is a good sign--that the Internet helps in debunking and that word has spread around that it's absolutely false. In my deeper search I read one page that referred to an AP article about it in 2000, so alot of this first-page-Google debunking isn't that new.

I see that it is mainly astrology, religious and "new-agey" sites that most recently comment on this balancing business. These are a few of many:

2000
http://www.worldtrek.org/odyssey/mideast/040100/040100kavinoruz.html

Kids site (rolls eyes).
http://www.sciensational.com/physics.php

Astrology Sept 2005.
http://www.astrologers-online.com/SkyWatch/sept_2005.html

Some dude who has read Briane Greene's book but still sneaks to the fridge on March 20th.
Safe blog (http://sandyhamilton.blogs.com/sandy_hamilton/2005/03/thank_god_lent_.html)

A nutritional site that mentions it while they're recommending eating eggs.
http://www.benefitsofjuice.com/20708.php

An informative 2004 BBC article that mentions Phil Plait (aka BA) as one source.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A2181377

Personally, I never encountered this myth either. My family has an Easter custom of breaking eachother's hardboiled eggs, and the one who has an uncracked end wins...alot of hardboiled eggs, lol. I think one would have to be in some serious denial or sheltered to believe this--but some legends die hard.


Hmm, I shared this elsewhere, but I found a Google image of the Greek Easter egg-cracking tradition:

Red Egg Competition (http://www.explorecrete.com/traditions/images/pascha-egg.jpg). I don't know that every Greek family does this on the Easter--I know many who don't. The red egg is given out at the end of the Greek Orthodox service tomorrow night, and it symbolizes the rebirth of Jesus. There's a special dye they use that gives the eggs a deep, rich blood-red color. I'm not religious, but I'm going for the egg. ;-) It's a very pretty ritual with the choir et al. In fact, some of the Vernal Equinox-egg-balancing-myth may get further confused by traditions such as these. FYI, see below. (This isn't about religion, per se, but for clarifying this odd egg/Vernal Equinox myth. I think people, oftimes, make associations without thinking too hard about them, such as with some of the solar eclipse pregnancy myths and the Moon's effect on pregnancy.)



The Orthodox date for Easter is based on a decree of the First Ecumenical Council of the undivided Church at Nicaea, Asia Minor, held in 325 A.D. under Emperor Constantine the Great. According to this decree, the determination of the date of Easter is governed by a computation based on the vernal equinox and the phase of the moon. Therefore, Easter Sunday should fall on the Sunday, which follows the first full moon after the vernal equinox, according to the Julian Calendar, which was in use at that time. If the full moon happens to fall on a Sunday, Easter is observed the following Sunday.

SNIP

On HOLY SATURDAY EVENING, the Easter Resurrection Service begins with Matins at 11 p.m. At midnight, the Church is completely darkened and the faithful wait in joyous expectation for the Bishop or priest to come forth carrying a white candle, chanting, Come, Receive the Light, the Light of the Resurrection. The light is passed to the congregation until the Church is aglow with candlelight. A procession of altar boys, choir, chanters and clergy joined by the people move outdoors where the Gospel proclaiming the Resurrection of Christ is read. The triumphant hymn, Christos Anesti, Christ is Risen is joyfully sung by the faithful. At the conclusion of the Resurrection Liturgy, red Easter eggs are distributed to the congregation, which symbolize the Resurrection of Jesus Christ.
http://jmm.aaa.net.au/articles/9315.htm (http://jmm.aaa.net.au/articles/9315.htm)



Kids do enjoy the egg-cracking contests, as it's always cool to have the winning egg, and it is as harmless as an egg hunt (hardboiled for this game, please, raw for balancing). :D

Senior Member
2007-Mar-21, 12:46 AM
I tried right now which is march 20, 2007 and to tell u the truth it did not work. but i have one question did my teacher lie cause she said a long time ago she tried it and it worked does im not doin right its a lie she made up??????

Fazor
2007-Mar-21, 04:29 PM
I tried right now which is march 20, 2007 and to tell u the truth it did not work. but i have one question did my teacher lie cause she said a long time ago she tried it and it worked does im not doin right its a lie she made up??????

I doubt she lied; it's possible to stand an egg on end any day of the year. My understanding of why this myth is perpetuated is because of "self-fulfilling prophecy"

People think it's only possible to stand an egg on end on this day, so on the equanox they will sit and try until they get it to stand. Any other day, they think it's impossible. So when it fails on the first attempt or two, they give up because they (falsely) "know" it's impossible to stand it on end if it's not the equanox.

That's my understanding from an article i read last year, anyway.

jsuttile
2007-Mar-25, 03:53 AM
Good thoughts....and I agree, but what makes me even more crazy...see my post...is the explanation given...that the yolk sinks to the bottom lowering the center of gravity when in actuality, it is the white that is more dense than the lipid yolk and it sinks....leaving the yolk to float slightly higher in the egg.

HenrikOlsen
2007-Mar-25, 11:14 AM
Ok, so instead of having the yolk sinking to the bottom, lowering the center of gravity, the real explanation is that the yolk rises to the top, lowering the center of gravity.

Since the result in both case is that the center of gravity ends up lower, thus making it easier to stand the egg, it is still self fulfillment, with one detail missed.

jsuttile
2007-Mar-25, 05:11 PM
so basically, you are fine with all that missinformation being put out there? My biggest problem with the yolk sinking theory is the emperor's new clothes mentality. If someone says it's so, it must be even though common sense...if people bother to use it...doesn't come into play at all. I want my students to recognize that is something doesn't make sense, they should question it. Then they will grow up to be intellingent adults, not sheep following whatever anyone tells them. The big picture is much more important than realizing that yolks are less dense than albumen.......

HenrikOlsen
2007-Mar-25, 05:18 PM
The central part of the argument is that over time the center of gravity moves lower thus making it easier to balance the egg if you believe you can balance the egg than if you give up earlier because you don't.

That the hypothesis for the mechanism for this lowered center of gravity has a flaw resulting from bad data (relative densities of yolk and white) does not invalidate it as an explanation for different success rates of believers and disbelievers, and I would expect it to get fixed in new editions.

jsuttile
2007-Mar-25, 05:45 PM
I totally agree with the self-fulfilling prophecy aspect, with the belief and confidence that you can accomplish anything if you try hard enough and they are all good aspects of the egg balancing , but the error in logic about the relative densities still persists and it doesn't look like it's ever going to get corrected. I first heard it about about 10 years ago and wondered how people could accept that yolk sinking thing. I waited for corrections to come from such usually valid sources as National Geographic for Kids, Weekly Reader...but they never did. I just picked up the fight again...Mythbusters mentions it several times while balancing the eggs....and hope that the lesson of thinking for yourself gets out there. This whole misconception and mythbusting drive is not to prove who knows more about minute details than whom, but to....I hope...encourage our youth...and our adults...to use their brains and not accept what they are told by whatever authority. Otherwise, we are doomed to a society of mediocrity......