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ToSeek
2003-Mar-06, 05:46 PM
The 1006 supernova, at magnitude -7.5 (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n0303/05brightest/).

I can't tell you how much I want to see a supernova, and we're overdue for one!

Donnie B.
2003-Mar-06, 05:56 PM
Not too nearby, please! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

gethen
2003-Mar-06, 06:12 PM
Uh, how nearby is "too nearby?" First huge asteroids, then rogue planets, now supernovas? I can't worry about all this stuff at once, you know.

Zap
2003-Mar-06, 06:41 PM
On 2003-03-06 13:12, gethen wrote:
Uh, how nearby is "too nearby?" First huge asteroids, then rogue planets, now supernovas? I can't worry about all this stuff at once, you know.


Don't forget close black hole encounters and galaxy collisions. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

_________________
-Zap
If you didn't like the opinions expressed in this post, get over it!

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<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Zap on 2003-03-06 13:43 ]</font>

gethen
2003-Mar-06, 08:31 PM
I'm now climbing back into bed and pulling the pillow over my head, singing, "Don't worry, be happy."

daver
2003-Mar-06, 09:21 PM
On 2003-03-06 15:31, gethen wrote:
I'm now climbing back into bed and pulling the pillow over my head, singing, "Don't worry, be happy."


"Always look on the bright side of life, te-dum, te dum-de-dum-de-dum"

Magnitude -7 might be a bit too bright, though.

g99
2003-Mar-07, 03:51 AM
On 2003-03-06 16:21, daver wrote:

"Always look on the bright side of life, te-dum, te dum-de-dum-de-dum"




OY! not Monty Python again! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

Lexx_Luthor
2003-Mar-07, 06:19 AM
I hide under my bed, afraid the Milky Way will become an active galaxy. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

I wish more people would think of this as something that could affect the Earth over the last 5 billion years or so. Can "normal" galaxies become "active"?

Kiwi
2003-Mar-07, 09:25 AM
Quote: "I can't tell you how much I want to see a supernova, and we're overdue for one!"

Well, Supernova 1987A was pretty cool. I could walk outside from my brightly-lit flat (apartment to some of you), stand bathed in multiple bright-orange street lights, and see it immediately as a naked-eye sight.

kucharek
2003-Mar-07, 09:42 AM
Magnitude -26.7, our good old sun /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

Harald

tvelocity
2003-Mar-07, 11:48 AM
Wow. So in 71,000 years when that shockwave gets here, what's going to happen?

tvelocity
2003-Mar-07, 11:53 AM
Here's something else to make Gethen worry a bit more...

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/supernova_threat_021216.html

gethen
2003-Mar-07, 03:18 PM
Gee, thanks for the link, tvelocity. Made my day. Actually, a couple years ago I read an sf novel about just such an event. Cannot remember the name just now. It was suitably frightening.

ToSeek
2003-Mar-07, 04:05 PM
On 2003-03-07 04:25, Kiwi wrote:
Quote: "I can't tell you how much I want to see a supernova, and we're overdue for one!"

Well, Supernova 1987A was pretty cool. I could walk outside from my brightly-lit flat (apartment to some of you), stand bathed in multiple bright-orange street lights, and see it immediately as a naked-eye sight.


I never realized that 1987A was naked-eye visible, though of course none of us in the northern hemisphere had the opportunity to see it without traveling.

traztx
2003-Mar-07, 04:16 PM
On 2003-03-07 06:48, tvelocity wrote:
Wow. So in 71,000 years when that shockwave gets here, what's going to happen?


Probably less than what happens from the local solar wind every day.

David Hall
2003-Mar-07, 04:20 PM
We had a recent thread on how near a supernova has to be to be deadly. 7100ly is very safe.

http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?topic=3590&forum=2

nebularain
2003-Mar-07, 06:31 PM
On 2003-03-07 01:19, Lexx_Luthor wrote:
Can "normal" galaxies become "active"?

When two normal galaxies collide, I believe.

Kaptain K
2003-Mar-08, 02:03 AM
On 2003-03-07 13:31, nebularain wrote:


On 2003-03-07 01:19, Lexx_Luthor wrote:
Can "normal" galaxies become "active"?

When two normal galaxies collide, I believe.


According to this article:

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/boom_times_020610-1.html

The Milky Way is building to a burst of star formation in about 200 million years. Since many of these stars will be very massive and therefore short lived, the rate of supernovae will rise from the current 1/400 years to one per year! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_eek.gif