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aurorae
2003-Mar-06, 06:50 PM
Here's a good article, the Galileo probe has been turned off until its demise.

http://skyandtelescope.com/news/current/article_888_1.asp

Goodbye, old probe. You done good.

Zap
2003-Mar-06, 06:53 PM
I can't take this; two awesome spacecrafts (other being Pioneer 10) we're bidding farewell to at once. Ahhhhh!! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif

But in the mean time, we'll also be saying hello to other good ones, such as Cassini-Huygens, the Pluto mission, and Messenger. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

calliarcale
2003-Mar-06, 07:01 PM
To be more precise, they turned off the tape recorder as it no longer will have any function. The spacecraft is still alive, as noted in the article, and will continue to function, sending back limited real-time data. That data is being received by the DSN (which, last I checked, was scheduling about an hour of Galileo coverage a week), but they're only using that to verify the spacecraft's position. Galileo will continue to send data up until its demise, or until radiation near Jupiter causes it to go into "safe mode" again, whichever comes first. If it does do that, it will continue to transmit at least its carrier signal, however, so observers on Earth will know the exact moment it fails.

tusenfem
2003-Mar-07, 07:56 AM
Too bad that such a nice project has to come to an end, even through all the failings that happened (not opening of the main antenna, the EUV camera at the wrong part of the spacecraft, the sudden save-mode and dataloss at E6) it produced soooooooo much great data and results. Sometimes I am "happy" that the antenna did not open, otherwise I think that working with the magnetometer data would have been almost impossible because of the sampling rate. I have spend a very happy 6 years in the Galileo community, and I am still working on the data, and I guess that that will not stop for a while. "Unfortunately" I don't have that much time anymore to work on it full time, Cluster is taking up most of my time now.
But thank you, Galileo, you made my life a lot more interesting.

Martin