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Melusine
2006-Mar-09, 03:09 PM
This quiz was discussed on the old BABB, but this is a nice online version of it, and there are alot of new people here. Even though it's US-centric, I recall Paulie J (Aussie) coming out like a Dixie.

I am "34% Dixie. You are definitely a Yankee." which is because I have some Texas influence, such as knowing what Beverage Barns are.

Safe site:
http://www.alphadictionary.com/articles/yankeetest.html

Argos
2006-Mar-09, 03:16 PM
Hundred per cent yankee here, if such can be said of a south american. :)

Cylinder
2006-Mar-09, 03:25 PM
Very funny.


86% Dixie. Do you still use Confederate money?

No. I'm saving mine.

ToSeek
2006-Mar-09, 03:29 PM
60% Dixie. Barely in Dixie.

Considering I've lived in Maryland since 1982, that's right on the money.

Argos
2006-Mar-09, 03:31 PM
In fact I cheated. My English taps on all anglosphere. I call it United Nations´English. But I´d be a yankee, philosophically.

Tinaa
2006-Mar-09, 03:34 PM
91% Dixie. Is General Lee your grandfather?!

Of course, I do live deep in the Heart of Texas!

And no, my neck is not the least bit red.

teddyv
2006-Mar-09, 03:34 PM
22% Dixie, and I'm Canadian, west coast. Interesting how many of the pronunciations I use are common in Great Lakes and Northeast US, yet to my ears people in these regions have a very different accent.

Sigma_Orionis
2006-Mar-09, 03:36 PM
41% Dixie, now that's funny, I learned English in Canada :D

Tensor
2006-Mar-09, 04:39 PM
41% Dixie, now that's funny, I learned English in Canada :D

Southern Canada, I'll bet. :lol:

sidmel
2006-Mar-09, 04:54 PM
71% Dixie. Your neck must be a little pink!

Hey, I thought we were neutral.

WHarris
2006-Mar-09, 05:22 PM
29% Dixie. You are a Yankee Doodle Dandy.


Not surprising, since I'm grew up in the Rochester, NY area.

NEOWatcher
2006-Mar-09, 05:48 PM
48% Dixie
My answers kept coming up saying that it tends to be in the Great Lakes region - I don't understand. :eek: Almost as if Erie was a Great Lake.

ToSeek
2006-Mar-09, 06:18 PM
Southern Canada, I'll bet. :lol:

Odds are good. Hardly anyone lives in northern Canada. ;)

scottmsg
2006-Mar-09, 06:20 PM
49% Dixie. Barely in Yankeedom.

I guess that's not surprising, since I'm only a few minutes from the Mason-Dixon line.

Doodler
2006-Mar-09, 06:26 PM
50% Dixie. Barely in Yankeedom.

Sounds about right for someone born in DC and raised in Maryland.

soylentgreen
2006-Mar-09, 06:28 PM
9% Dixie. You are as Yankee as they get!!

Sorry, I've never forgiven The Palmetto State for April 12 '61. ;)


oh yeah...Drive through liquor stores?

turbo-1
2006-Mar-09, 06:44 PM
18% Dixie. And tht little bit is because although I'm from Maine, I worked for several years in the deep south and "up north" in Kentucky consulting for heavy industry. I was doing some training work in a pulp mill in Orange, TX, and when I said "then you press this button...", the superintendent stopped me and said, "Stop there, you've got to tell the operators to "mash" that button. If you don't talk "Bubba" you ain't got a chance of getting through to 'em."

Swift
2006-Mar-09, 06:57 PM
31% Dixie. You are definitely a Yankee.
Born in NY, lived in RI, France, Louisiana, and now Ohio. I thought I was a mutt? ;)

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-09, 07:04 PM
22% Dixie, and I'm Canadian, west coast. Interesting how many of the pronunciations I use are common in Great Lakes and Northeast US, yet to my ears people in these regions have a very different accent.

33% Dixie. Apparently Upper Canadian English is similar to that of the Great Lakes and Northeast US as well, even though we have accents that I would consider very distinct from our New England/Great Lakes bretheren. And apparently, Ontario English is similar to BC English.

long live the queeb
2006-Mar-09, 07:23 PM
38% Dixie, you are definitely a Yankee.

Good going for a 51 year old Limey:lol:

Gruesome
2006-Mar-09, 07:28 PM
31% Dixie. You are definitely a Yankee.

Seems apt, been a Michigander my whole life.

lek
2006-Mar-09, 07:34 PM
26% Dixie. You are a Yankee Doodle Dandy.

For someone who isnt american and didnt understand 4 questions/answers...

Dr Nigel
2006-Mar-09, 07:36 PM
I got 52%. Dixie, just barely.

However, I had to omit answers to 5 of the questions, because the correct options for me were not available.

E.g. "Aunt" rhymes with "aren't" (not "ain't", "ant" or "caught")

Also, "Youse" for "you, plural" is common in Glasgow, not just NYC and New Jersey.

jrkeller
2006-Mar-09, 07:51 PM
39% Dixie. Definitely a Yankee.

Even though I have lived in TX 20+ years, my first 23 were in Chicago and Michigan, mainly Detroit.

ngc3314
2006-Mar-09, 08:02 PM
71% southern. I suppose being born in Mississippi, growing up in Tennessee, and working in Alabama for the last 18 years makes up for that 7-year interlude in California, Arizona, and the Netherlands.

Gillianren
2006-Mar-09, 08:08 PM
91% Dixie. Is General Lee your grandfather?!

No, but he is my several-greats uncle.

34% Dixie. A lot of my answers were in the "such and such place . . . and California" range, as well as the "practically everywhere" range.

eugenek
2006-Mar-09, 08:15 PM
38% Yankee. The test seemed to have pegged my Michigan roots.

Jim
2006-Mar-09, 08:17 PM
66% Dixie. I think the crawdads did it.

Melusine
2006-Mar-09, 08:38 PM
It's interesting for those who have moved like Swift and Jr Keller, et al. If I change my answers to what they would have been prior to moving to Texas, I would get:

20% Dixie. Wow! You are a Duke of Yankeedom!

I've adopted feeder road, crawfish, and Beverage barns. But Tinaa, my co-workers who are native Texans got around 60% & 69%, but they've always been city dwellers, so I'm wondering how rural you are. :)

Another thing not on the quiz, but Texans say is "suckers" instead of "lollipops." I've called them lollipops since I was a kid. What do they call them in other English-speaking countries?

Doodler
2006-Mar-09, 09:36 PM
We called them suckers in Southern Maryland, but they're lollipops up in the DC suburbs of Maryland.

SeanF
2006-Mar-09, 09:37 PM
Another thing not on the quiz, but Texans say is "suckers" instead of "lollipops." I've called them lollipops since I was a kid. What do they call them in other English-speaking countries?
We call 'em "suckers" up here in South Dakota, too.

How about "mow the lawn" vs. "cut the grass"? :) I think "mow the lawn" is more common around here, but I've heard both.

N C More
2006-Mar-09, 09:41 PM
That's a pretty accurate test..."26% Dixie. You are a Yankee Doodle Dandy." I've lived my whole life in either upstate NY or New England!

Sigma_Orionis
2006-Mar-09, 09:56 PM
Southern Canada, I'll bet. :lol:


Odds are good. Hardly anyone lives in northern Canada. ;)


Well I did learn English in Ottawa, How southern is that? :D

Swift
2006-Mar-09, 10:05 PM
It's interesting for those who have moved like Swift and Jr Keller, et al. If I change my answers to what they would have been prior to moving to Texas, I would get:

20% Dixie. Wow! You are a Duke of Yankeedom!

Pre-Ohio, I would have said "soda" (and pronounced it "so-dar") like a good New Yorker. But 18 years in Ohio have re-programmed me to "pop".

Amongst sub/grinder/po-boy/hero, I usually adjust to the local lingo. In Ohio, it is usually a sub, unless you go to a "Mr. Hero".

Another one: If you order a "regular" coffee, what do you get? In some areas that means black, in others, cream and sugar.

Melusine
2006-Mar-09, 10:31 PM
I got 52%. Dixie, just barely.

However, I had to omit answers to 5 of the questions, because the correct options for me were not available.

E.g. "Aunt" rhymes with "aren't" (not "ain't", "ant" or "caught")

Also, "Youse" for "you, plural" is common in Glasgow, not just NYC and New Jersey.
Hmm...I've met a lot of British people, but I don't recall anyone pronouncing aunt as "arnt." What area is that from? I pronounce it with like a nasally "want." Every once in a while "bath" with slip out like "bahth" in the same way. Then I get laughed at.

Swift, in New England, the Dunkin Donuts I'd go to considered "regular" as coffee with cream and two sugars. Black was the exception.

All my co-workers said they didn't call Mischief Night anything--no name for it. They didn't cause mischief either on that night, but they threw eggs at people's houses anytime of the year if they didn't like them, and toilet papered their house (a.k.a "your house got wrapped") if you liked them. Lol.

mike alexander
2006-Mar-09, 11:55 PM
26% Dixie, but the rest is pure Great Lakes. Which makes sense, since I was born in Cleveland. Some of the 'southronisms' I can attribute to my father, who was raised in southeast Ohio.

Parrothead
2006-Mar-10, 12:14 AM
I am "40% Dixie. You are definitely a Yankee." Must be the S. Ont. thing, we all know the actual pronunciation of Toronto. ;)

Big Brother Dunk
2006-Mar-10, 12:43 AM
36% Dixie. You are definitely a Yankee.

I'm a yankee doodle canuck...

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-10, 01:29 AM
... stuck a beaver in his hat and called it Diefenbaker...

StarStuff
2006-Mar-10, 02:11 AM
I got "30% Dixie. You are a Yankee Doodle Dandy."

Hmm.... The results from the Canucks here seem to be pretty well within the same range, regardless of province/region.

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-10, 02:21 AM
S'true. Of course, that's consistent with what I've observed. I can't notice linguistic differences in any Anglophone Canadian west of Quebec.

Trebuchet
2006-Mar-10, 02:40 AM
I'm a 20 percenter. I grew up in Montana and live in the Northwest, both regions seem to be kind of neglected on the quiz.

And those are suckers where I came from.

The fizzy stuff was pop back in MT but it's become soda out here.

And I don't think anyone in either local knows much about the little lobster things in the "cricks".

Tinaa
2006-Mar-10, 04:15 AM
I've adopted feeder road, crawfish, and Beverage barns. But Tinaa, my co-workers who are native Texans got around 60% & 69%, but they've always been city dwellers, so I'm wondering how rural you are. :)


I'm very country. Shoot fire, I live thirty miles outside San Antonio and I feel a bit claustrophobic!

'Course, you know your talking to a real Texan if you hear, "I'm fixin' to go to the store, what kinda Coke do you want? Coke, DP or 7up?"

Pleiades
2006-Mar-10, 05:06 AM
35% Dixie. You are definitely a Yankee.

Not unexpected, I was an airforce brat and traveled alot. That 35% was five years in Kansas.

Enzp
2006-Mar-10, 05:37 AM
Got 41%. I grew up in MD outside DC, but have been in Michigan the last 40 some years. SO I see things that have changed over time. Here we hear about Devils night every year, but back home ther was no name for it. And Here we say Pop, but never did in MD. And we had Hoagies, but no one here would say that. My Dixie Quotient - DQ - is fading I think.

COme to think of it, when I lived there, no one would say "DC", it was always "the District." I don't know if that is still the case or even if it was a local phenomenon where I was or within my family.

baric
2006-Mar-10, 05:58 AM
64% Dixie -- grew up in Houston

Gillianren
2006-Mar-10, 06:18 AM
The joy of having grown up back in LA is that about half the people I knew said "lollipop" and the other half said "sucker." Yay, melting pot! (Actually, huge numbers of them might've said whatever-you-call-it-in-other-languages.)

jumbo
2006-Mar-10, 11:54 AM
71% Dixie. Slightly pink neck. (hehehe if any sun hits my neck im redder than a lobster!)
Given im an Englishman living in Wales im a little surprised though i find my self using some of the southern phrases on that site.


I've met a lot of British people, but I don't recall anyone pronouncing aunt as "arnt." What area is that from?
I pronounce aunt and arnt pretty much the same. Im originally from the South West of England, most people i think say it that way there IIRC

Melusine
2006-Mar-10, 12:18 PM
I'm very country. Shoot fire, I live thirty miles outside San Antonio and I feel a bit claustrophobic!

'Course, you know your talking to a real Texan if you hear, "I'm fixin' to go to the store, what kinda Coke do you want? Coke, DP or 7up?"
It's interesting about Coke being used to represent any coca-cola, but when my sister says, "I want a Coke," and the waitress replies, "We have Pepsi," she refuses it. She will not drink Pepsi, whereas when I ask for a Coke, I'll take what they have--I just mean a cola drink as opposed to the other sodas.

Regarding Canadians, since I ate lunch practically every day with all these hockey players for a few years (they were like a pack of brothers), I never could tell the difference between someone from Kitchener or Flin Flon or Calgary. I remember somebody from Moncton who sounded similar to those who have a distinct Maine accent from more rural parts. But apart from the Quebec guys, they all seemed the same, and apart from using eh? or sometimes, "you think?" at the end of a sentence, they spoke like me. The only characteristic I noticed that was different between them all is that this one goalie who was from Vancouver was the most laid back person of them all. He also complained about the New England cold, which he said was worse than Vancouver since Vancouver has those warming westerly winds. Now, I don't know if there is some general Vancouverian laid-backness, but I know if I lived in a beautiful city, I'd probably be more laid back, too! Still, they all spoke the same, and generally spoke better than non-college educated people from my state (most had no college). They claimed back then that their high school education was generally better than the US's. :shifty:

Gillianren, that's interesting about your connections to General Lee.

Argos, I find your comments interesting. For those who learn English, who or what is their influence? If you were going to refer to sneakers, would you say sneakers, tennis shoes or gym shoes in English? The internet makes absorption of other language's colloquialisms accessible. I pick up some British ones, such as "having kittens." That one cracks me up--a British customer was talking about a guy who was "freaking out" over not getting something in time and he said, "He was having kittens about it." I had to look that one up.

Argos
2006-Mar-10, 01:28 PM
Argos, I find your comments interesting. For those who learn English, who or what is their influence? If you were going to refer to sneakers, would you say sneakers, tennis shoes or gym shoes in English? The internet makes absorption of other language's colloquialisms accessible. I pick up some British ones, such as "having kittens." That one cracks me up--a British customer was talking about a guy who was "freaking out" over not getting something in time and he said, "He was having kittens about it." I had to look that one up.

Melusine, I would say "tennis shoes" [in Portuguese it´s simply "tenis"]. Most of my references are from the northeastern US, where I travelled to a couple of times (though I´ve learned my English in England at the age of 16). With time I ended up shedding my English English to take on the American English - it seems natural since I´m very exposed to the American culture. But I still retain some British references. My English is actually a patchwork of influences - from books, movies, music, the Internet, people I meet. I think my accent mimics that of the Northeastern US.

A propos, I completed the test to find out that I am 34% dixie. It´s compatible with my background.

Melusine
2006-Mar-10, 01:45 PM
Melusine, I would say "tennis shoes" [in Portuguese it´s simply "tenis"]. Most of my references are from the northeastern US, where I travelled to a couple of times (though I´ve learned my English in England at the age of 16). With time I ended up shedding my English English to take on the American English - it seems natural since I´m very exposed to the American culture. But I still retain some British references. My English is actually a patchwork of influences - from books, movies, music, the Internet, people I meet. I think my accent mimics that of the Northeastern US.

A propos, I completed the test to find out that I am 34% dixie. It´s compatible with my background.
I've always said sneakers, here in Texas they say tennis shoes or tennies. Tennis shoes have always been those specific sneakers used on tennis courts, to me. Everyone I grew up with in my home state said "sneakers." I don't know about other New England states, but my cousins from Great Falls, VA (close to D.C.) said sneakers, too.

Edit: I should add, we weren't allowed to wear sneakers on the clay tennis courts at our club, we had to wear tennis shoes. With bowling, we had to wear bowling shoes. Thus the separate distinction.

Argos
2006-Mar-10, 02:04 PM
I've always said sneakers, here in Texas they say tennis shoes or tennies. Tennis shoes have always been those specific sneakers used on tennis courts, to me. Everyone I grew up with in my home state said "sneakers." I don't know about other New England states, but my cousins from Great Falls, VA (close to D.C.) said sneakers, too.

Yeah, I´m aware of that. I feel more comfortable with 'tennis shoes' because of the corresponding word in Portuguese. And that´s within my being 34% dixie. ;)

Sigma_Orionis
2006-Mar-10, 03:05 PM
I have been told by people from the US that when I speak english I tend to sound like a Canadian (which makes sense because, like I said I learned english in Ottawa when I was 11). It's funny though, I once met two Texans that spoke spanish and sounded VERY Mexican :)

SG-1 Fan
2006-Mar-10, 03:24 PM
50% Dixie. Barely in Yankeedom.

"Born-n-raised" in Lexington, KY (go cats!). 3 years in Hawaii (Army) and now 5 in Louisville and I only get a 50%! Pa is rolling over in his grave...

ToSeek
2006-Mar-10, 03:34 PM
So who's heard the term "bubbler" for a water fountain? It's a first for me, but my Boston friends (to whom I sent this quiz) were very familiar with the term.

Swift
2006-Mar-10, 03:59 PM
So who's heard the term "bubbler" for a water fountain? It's a first for me, but my Boston friends (to whom I sent this quiz) were very familiar with the term.
Yep, going to school in Rhode Island I heard it too, and then again in the South, but it never became part of my vocabulary.

Tinaa
2006-Mar-10, 04:21 PM
It's funny though, I once met two Texans that spoke spanish and sounded VERY Mexican :)

I've taken a couple of Spanish classes and we learned mostly "Mexican Spanish" which, I suppose, is kin to "American English." I've found my Texas accent is not compatable with Spanish of any sort. I an read it fairly okay, but speaking it is a total nightmare for me and the listener!

Sigma_Orionis
2006-Mar-10, 04:36 PM
I've taken a couple of Spanish classes and we learned mostly "Mexican Spanish" which, I suppose, is kin to "American English." I've found my Texas accent is not compatable with Spanish of any sort. I an read it fairly okay, but speaking it is a total nightmare for me and the listener!

Then you would probably sound like QuickDraw McGraw in spanish :lol:

Moose
2006-Mar-10, 04:57 PM
25% Dixie.

I'm from a long line of Maritime Acadian farmers, fisherfolk, maniacs ("Sorry about the White House. I see you've rebuilt it. It's very nice.") smugglers and rum runners.

Melusine, I'd almost be willing to pay to see you hearing native Monctonians in Moncton speaking. See if you still think they sound like folks from Maine. :lol:

But yeah, there are a lot of similarities in how folks from Maine speak and how we speak. Some differences (mostly in local vocabulary), but the pronounciations are similar.

Maritimers will commonly say any of soda, pop, and/or soft drinks. Never (ever) Coke unless that's the brand you're looking for. Never tonic (unless you're getting it with gin); unflavored carbonated water is much more commonly known as club soda.

Argos
2006-Mar-10, 05:30 PM
Yeah, Soda and Club soda are ok to me, even in Portuguese.

Dr Nigel
2006-Mar-10, 05:31 PM
I pronounce aunt and arnt pretty much the same. Im originally from the South West of England, most people i think say it that way there IIRC

Yes, I think "aunt" is pronounced that way across the whole of the south of England these days (I've heard no difference in its pronunciation from Essex to Gloucestershire, to Bristol, to Hampshire).

It's also pretty close to "aren't" in the north of England, too.

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-10, 05:41 PM
Given im an Englishman living in Wales im a little surprised though i find my self using some of the southern phrases on that site.

Not too odd, actually, given that the Soutern accent is in fact derived dirctly from the highland Scots accent. I'm sure there's enough similarity between a Scots accent and an English accent that there would be correlations between a Southern and an English accent.

Moose: Your familiy was in on the Whitehouse thing? Mine too!

Melusine
2006-Mar-10, 05:50 PM
Melusine, I'd almost be willing to pay to see you hearing native Monctonians in Moncton speaking. See if you still think they sound like folks from Maine. :lol:

How do they sound? Again, this was a hockey player who travelled around a bit. Are you saying it's a much thicker accent? I've never been to Moncton.
:confused:

Moose
2006-Mar-10, 05:55 PM
Moose: Your familiy was in on the Whitehouse thing? Mine too!

No idea, really. :) The family histories don't go back quite that far, and where they do, we've lived in the few places mostly unaffected by the more traumatic events affecting Acadia and Lower Canada.

But there were Acadians (mostly up around Québec city after the Deportation) involved up to their eyebrows in the War of 1812. I don't think my family was especially subversive, but I do know some of my ancestors were smugglers.

And considering my extended family has 700+ members (in two of the six major family branches) who showed up for the last family reunion on my great-grandfather's old farmland, the odds aren't bad that there were some mischief-makers somewhere in there.

A close friend's grandfather actually did run rum during Prohibition.

Moose
2006-Mar-10, 06:04 PM
How do they sound? Again, this was a hockey player who travelled around a bit. Are you saying it's a much thicker accent? I've never been to Moncton.
:confused:

Hee hee! Hoo yeah. :)

See, Moncton is without a doubt the most bilingual city in Canada. Most folks in New Brunswick speak both our official languages to some degree. Monctonians take it a step further: they speak both languages simultaneously.

"J'ai drivé le car dans l'ditch" and "J'ai leavé mes smokes dans mon locker" are just two (among MANY) linguistical gems I've heard from my Monctonian cousins.

"Shiaque" is the name of their particular dialect. ("Brayon" from up in Madawaska county sounds like Shiaque without the english. It's the french form of what the northern Mainers speak.) It's funny, not even the more notorious dialects like the one spoken in Cape Breton has its own name. *grin*

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-10, 06:06 PM
No idea, really. :) The family histories don't go back quite that far, and where they do, we've lived in the few places mostly unaffected by the more traumatic events affecting Acadia and Lower Canada.

Oh, I see. My aunt is actually a geneologist, and had traced my mother's side of the family back to the 17th century. That's the only reason I know... ;)

Swift
2006-Mar-10, 06:41 PM
Hee hee! Hoo yeah. :)

See, Moncton is without a doubt the most bilingual city in Canada. Most folks in New Brunswick speak both our official languages to some degree. Monctonians take it a step further: they speak both languages simultaneously.

"J'ai drivé le car dans l'ditch" and "J'ai leavé mes smokes dans mon locker" are just two (among MANY) linguistical gems I've heard from my Monctonian cousins.

"Shiaque" is the name of their particular dialect. ("Brayon" from up in Madawaska county sounds like Shiaque without the english. It's the french form of what the northern Mainers speak.) It's funny, not even the more notorious dialects like the one spoken in Cape Breton has its own name. *grin*
Very interesting and I knew nothing about that. I've lived in two places where there were influences of both French and English. In Rhode Island there are a few expressions that I was always told are remnants of some Acadian influence, such as "Park the cars side by each" and "Throw me up the stairs my shoes".

There are a lot more in Louisiana, my favorite was always "Making groceries" (for going grocery shopping).

When I lived in France I rented a room from an Algerian lady who rented rooms to Americans. The various Americans would often speak to each other in a mixture of French and English, she would always complain that we should stop speaking "Fran-gley". We would respond, as soon as you stop speaking "Fran-abic" (French-Arabic) to your daughter. :D

Melusine
2006-Mar-10, 07:03 PM
Yeah, the Acadians and Cajuns in Louisiana have an "odd" version of French. My neighbor (and one boss) is Cajun, and his accent sounds similar to a Boston, MA accent or rural Maine, to me. I have no problem understanding a French person from Quebec City or Montreal, but the Cajun in LA, I have a hard time grasping, as well as the Creole.

I like your descriptions: "J'ai drivé le car dans l'ditch" and "J'ai leavé mes smokes dans mon locker"

That's kind of what I do when I forget Spanish words. :)

I'm surprised no Australians have replied to this thread. :(

A.DIM
2006-Mar-10, 07:11 PM
Fun.

61% Dixie "just below the Mason-Dixon line"
...though I moved often:

Weisbaden Germany 3yrs
Biloxi MS 1yr
Coperas Cove TX 1.5yrs
Langley VA 2yrs...

... before we settled on the southern shores of the Ohio River across from Cincy.

I speak "mutt."

Moose
2006-Mar-10, 07:47 PM
There are a lot more in Louisiana, my favorite was always "Making groceries" (for going grocery shopping).

*grin* A literal translation of "faire les groceries". I like it. :)

I had a chance, oh about ten years ago, to speak with a (distant) family member (fifth or six child of our original acadian ancestor family; my branch was, IIRC, the middle son?) whose branch grew up in Louisiana since the Deportation. The family had been really working on preserving their french, which I thought was pretty cool.

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-10, 08:50 PM
Interesting note about Maritime Acadian French: it's actually a lot closer to Parisien French than Quebecois is.

Gillianren
2006-Mar-10, 09:48 PM
So who's heard the term "bubbler" for a water fountain? It's a first for me, but my Boston friends (to whom I sent this quiz) were very familiar with the term.

That's funny, because I've heard it in Southern books. (Alas, I cannot remember which ones!)

My accent in Spanish is pretty erratic, given that I learned Spanish in a high school in Los Angeles from a Swedish immigrant who'd lived in Madrid and Buenos Aires, and my classmates were Mexican, Venezuelan, Colombian, Chinese, and Thai in origin--except David Hochenedel, the other white kid in the class.

And General Lee . . . well, now, that's an interesting, albeit unverified, family story for another time, perhaps.

Dr Nigel
2006-Mar-12, 04:54 PM
That's funny, because I've heard it in Southern books. (Alas, I cannot remember which ones!)

Hmm ... audio books, were they?? :)

Gillianren
2006-Mar-13, 10:39 PM
Hmm ... audio books, were they?? :)

Okay, okay, read it! (But my boyfriend does listen to a lot of audio books, just not Southern ones. [You can tell--no dead mules.])

Van Rijn
2006-Mar-13, 11:49 PM
30% Dixie. You are a Yankee Doodle Dandy. A lot of the "northeast" bits also apply to California. Where I varied, it was probably from my family's midwest influence.

LurchGS
2006-Mar-14, 07:24 AM
I had a hard time with the test.. I've lived in 20 or so states and visited all of them...I got a lot of "aw, everybody says that"

Part of my problem with the test is that I adjust my language to my surroundings..I talk texan with my texan employees, talk bahstan with the guy from Framingham, and a bi' o' east end with a friend or two...and good ol' suthun with my gran

so.. all answers are good for me

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-14, 07:56 PM
Yeah, I tend to do that as well. Whenever I'm speaking to someone with a very Canadian accent, I kind of slip into one as well. Hard to describe. Kind of a mix of an English/Irish/Scottish/Maritimer accent. And you generally raise your inflection at the end of a statement. In fact, you generally end with a question.

Moose
2006-Mar-14, 10:20 PM
Yeah, I tend to do that as well. Whenever I'm speaking to someone with a very Canadian accent, I kind of slip into one as well. Hard to describe. Kind of a mix of an English/Irish/Scottish/Maritimer accent. And you generally raise your inflection at the end of a statement. In fact, you generally end with a question.

Like John Morgan did so well(?)

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-14, 10:37 PM
John Morgan?

Edit: Oh! John Morgan! Pretty much, but a little less of the English accent and a bit more of the Irish. More like Roger Abbott, really.

Moose
2006-Mar-14, 10:52 PM
Yeah, exactly. Roger Abbott's another good example of that accent.

Sometime, if we ev-er 'ave a BAUT together-get, I will get to play around my fake french-canadien accent, eh?

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-14, 11:08 PM
As long as you don't bust out the Franglais. *Shudder*