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View Full Version : New Orleans, circa Summer 2006



jkmccrann
2006-Mar-10, 10:24 AM
I have a question for all you Americans out there. When I think of New Orleans these days, and see the slow-pace of recovery going on there - I have to wonder - what happens if in a few months time another hurricane strikes the city - knocks out a couple of levees and floods the city again?

What happens if the levees on the Mississippi breach this time - because the Mississippi levees are a lot higher than those fronting Lake Pontchartrain afterall - what happens then?

Given how far things have moved in New Orleans - what would another hurricane induced flood do to the place? Would it be time to admit the folly of trying to repair these levees? Its kinda fatalistic to insist in living in a place that is just so incredibly vulnerable to these possibilities isn't it?

A little bit like tempting fate?

What do you guys, the American taxpayers, think should be the correct course of action were such a horrific even to befall the city again in the near future?

Swift
2006-Mar-10, 04:12 PM
I'm unsure, but I suspect another hurricane hitting New Orleans would be a very serious setback. I do not think it would lead to New Orleans being abandoned, but I suspect it would mean that New Orleans would basically stay at its current size and not recover to where it was in the past.

farmerjumperdon
2006-Mar-10, 04:26 PM
In my opinion, you either get really serious about the fix, or get out. Take protection and preparation to the level the Dutch have or don't spend another dime.

Go big or go home.

If it were a private enterprise, I think business sense would dictate relocation. But since it is taxpayer money, it will certainly be wasted to a large degree.

Joe87
2006-Mar-10, 08:32 PM
There are areas of New Orleans that are above sea level. These should be rebuilt if they are damaged. The areas below sea level will always be vulnerable to future hurricanes, and rebuilding them is a waste of resources. It may take another hurricane or two to make this clear to the politicians, but in time we will all realize the futility of shoveling against the tide, so to speak.

jt-3d
2006-Mar-10, 09:10 PM
Fill it in up to around the second story level and rebuild. That's my plan, all we have to do is move one of the Rockies mountains plus we'd have a nice flat pass through the mountains to boot. That's the only plan I can come up with.

The levees they are replacing are stronger than the old ones but I think they said they were still only category 3 levees so I see no point.

Doodler
2006-Mar-10, 10:43 PM
What do you guys, the American taxpayers, think should be the correct course of action were such a horrific even to befall the city again in the near future?

Does the name "Atlantis" ring a bell?

Lord Jubjub
2006-Mar-11, 01:05 AM
Of course, there will likely NOT be a hurricane in New Orleans' immediate future. The close placement of Katrina and Rita was very unusual. The northeast quadrant of the Gulf of Mexico gets far fewer storms than any other section.

sarongsong
2006-Mar-11, 02:01 AM
President Bush lays out his case for re-building New Orleans at today's National Newspaper Assn. Govt. Affairs Conference, in this C-SPAN (http://www.c-span.org/) broadcast. [RealPlayer, 1:05:34]
Sounds like a done deal, so far.

Gullible Jones
2006-Mar-11, 02:06 AM
Of course, there will likely NOT be a hurricane in New Orleans' immediate future. The close placement of Katrina and Rita was very unusual. The northeast quadrant of the Gulf of Mexico gets far fewer storms than any other section.

It only took Katrina to mess the place up pretty bad, and that storm was only Category 3 by the time it hit IIRC. Another Category 3+ storm could give them serious problems.

turbo-1
2006-Mar-11, 02:21 AM
Of course, there will likely NOT be a hurricane in New Orleans' immediate future. The close placement of Katrina and Rita was very unusual. The northeast quadrant of the Gulf of Mexico gets far fewer storms than any other section.Please look at your statement again. The fact that New Orleans was whacked this year has NO effect on the chance that it will get whacked again next year.

None.

It may get hit by a big storm this year, too, and if the debris from the last is not cleaned up, the collateral damage will be higer next time (thanks, FEMA)!

Lord Jubjub
2006-Mar-11, 08:05 PM
True, but considering that New Orleans gets a close hurricane once every 2-3 decades, means that the odds in any one year are very low.

The most troubling aspect, though, is how many storms have been hitting land on the northern coast of the GOM the last two years, Way above average--which suggests that there may have been a shift somewhere that is funnelling storms into the Gulf.