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The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-13, 02:28 AM
As many of you are aware, I'm sure, Wheelock's is the seminal text for learning Latin. Pretty much everything you need to learn is in it. Now, I'm looking to brush up on my French, and I was wondering if anyone here knows of a comparable work dealing with French. I'd prefer Parisien to any other dialect, but barring that, Quebecois or Acadian would also work.

Thanks in advance to anyone who responds.

Moose
2006-Mar-13, 03:08 AM
Grevisse makes the best formal grammar I know of, just know that it's geared towards intermediates and onward. You'll need the basics before you can get much use from it, but once you're there, that's your bible from then on.

Besherelle is also the best reference in terms of conjugations. It's also a formal text, but is fairly accessible.

Both can almost certainly be gotten through Amazon.ca. (I'll try and take a few minutes to track down some urls tomorrow when I have a moment.)

Have you considered talking to your local community college? They often have night classes, and french second-language is an old staple. There's nothing quite like actually speaking the language to regain lost ground.

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-13, 03:13 AM
I'm considering going that route (Queen's probably has some good classes), but I kind of don't have the cash to shell out for them at the moment. Books will have to do. Besides, I took French for years in high school: I just need the books as a refresher and as a way to get the grammar right. As for conversing, my mother and aunt speak French fluently, so I can always hit them up for conversation.

Anyway, thanks for the recommendations, Moose.

Moose
2006-Mar-13, 11:20 AM
Respec' Maurice Grevisse (http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/2801110981/qid=1142248433/sr=8-3/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i3_xgl14/701-3919484-3051519)' auth-or-itay.

Bescherelle (http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/2894282591/qid=1142248647/sr=8-2/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i2_xgl14/701-3919484-3051519)'s been around the block once or thrice. Know it. Love it. Name your kittens after it.

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-13, 10:14 PM
Much obliged, Mosse. A thousand thanks.

Disinfo Agent
2006-Mar-13, 10:15 PM
I can't vouch for it 100%, but most of Larousse's publications should be worth looking into.

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-13, 10:19 PM
Larousse? Those are dictionaries, yes?

Moose
2006-Mar-13, 10:40 PM
Larousse does dictionaries, yes. But they also do grammars, thesauruses, and the like. They're one of the three or four really big names. I can't really tell you what skill level they're geared for, though. I'm really only familiar with the base dictionary. I would suspect them of being a bit technical. Hard to say.

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-13, 10:42 PM
Well, it's something to look into. And eventually, I'll need the more advanced stuff anyway.

Gillianren
2006-Mar-14, 12:49 AM
Bescherelle (http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/2894282591/qid=1142248647/sr=8-2/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i2_xgl14/701-3919484-3051519)'s been around the block once or thrice. Know it. Love it. Name your kittens after it.

But my kitten already has a name!

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-14, 02:11 AM
Doesn't matter. Every irregular verb you could ever want is in there.

Moose
2006-Mar-14, 02:19 AM
Doesn't matter. Every irregular verb you could ever want is in there.

... And all the ones you don't, for that matter.

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-14, 02:24 AM
True. Why the heck are there so many, anyway?

Moose
2006-Mar-14, 11:48 AM
Just to be a pain, TSC. Just to be a pain. ;)

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Mar-14, 07:53 PM
I think you hit the nail on the head. :)