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NEOWatcher
2006-Mar-13, 05:57 PM
I needed to get these rantings off my chest...

Did anyone try to test your knowledge of Mars on CNN? (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/03/10/mars.orbiter/index.html)(script link at the bottom of the article)

A scientist will probably come up with only a 70%
"Which science fiction book..." Just because it's a story about a martian?
and then we come to "Why was the Looney Tunes character Marvin the Martian trying to blow up Earth?":eh:


and then
Noah's Ark (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/03/13/satellite.noahs.ark/index.html).

"a feature that one researcher claims may be something of biblical proportions."
Is that all it takes? One researcher?
"I maintain that if it is the remains of something manmade and potentially nautical, then it's potentially something of biblical proportions."
You can say that again...At around 3miles altitude, anything man made would certainly be very important...

Roy Batty
2006-Mar-13, 06:11 PM
Re: the CNN quiz.
A bit harsh, most of the questions were relevant & it's only a bit of fun, but then I'm probably biased since I 12/12ed it :D

Re: Noah's Ark.
Blurghh! that's all :rolleyes:

Weird Dave
2006-Mar-13, 08:54 PM
It's a shame they didn't give any information on the wrong answers - it would have been nice to learn a bit about the real Martian geologic eras. And surely they could have told anyone stupid enough to pick "Kryptonite" that it doesn't exist!

But it isn't too dumb - a couple of the questions are tough. And I hadn't realised Mars's moons were named after "fear" and "panic" (although fear should have been obvious if I'd ever bothered to give it a second thought :doh: ).

Gillianren
2006-Mar-13, 10:59 PM
But it isn't too dumb - a couple of the questions are tough. And I hadn't realised Mars's moons were named after "fear" and "panic" (although fear should have been obvious if I'd ever bothered to give it a second thought :doh: ).

Oh, yeah--anyone who went through a mythology phase as a kid (er, me) could have told you that one. They were two of his four followers, the other two being Eris and . . . someone else. I don't remember, and I don't have copies of any of my favorite books of mythology. (Words from the Myths, by Isaac Asimov, being why I know most of this.)

Roy Batty
2006-Mar-13, 11:09 PM
Oh, yeah--anyone who went through a mythology phase as a kid (er, me) could have told you that one. They were two of his four followers, the other two being Eris and . . . someone else. I don't remember, and I don't have copies of any of my favorite books of mythology. (Words from the Myths, by Isaac Asimov, being why I know most of this.)
Woudn't you want to invite this crowd (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phobos_(god)) to a party? it'd be a real scream :) (Btw I know someone who's called their newborn daughter Eris:shifty: ).

Van Rijn
2006-Mar-13, 11:57 PM
Re: the CNN quiz.
A bit harsh, most of the questions were relevant & it's only a bit of fun, but then I'm probably biased since I 12/12ed it :D


Same here, easy test. I answered the questions as fast as I saw them.

mike alexander
2006-Mar-14, 12:16 AM
Get me my Illudium PU-36 Explosive Space Modulator!

Roy Batty
2006-Mar-14, 12:30 AM
Get me my Illudium PU-36 Explosive Space Modulator!Now, now, You've been told you can't have it back until you've proved you can play nicely! :)

Gillianren
2006-Mar-14, 12:51 AM
(Btw I know someone who's called their newborn daughter Eris:shifty: ).

Which all goes back to my belief that some people just shouldn't be allowed to name children! (I'm sorry, but Penn's very high on that list. What, was "Beat Me Up and Steal My Lunch Money" taken?)

baric
2006-Mar-14, 02:26 AM
I thought it was a funny poll :) The only questions I missed were a couple of science-related ones, LOL.

The "blocking his view of Venus" was a hilarious answer!

Chuck
2006-Mar-14, 02:28 AM
I got all 12 right, although 3 were semi-educated guesses. The Kryptonite answer was only slightly funnier than Mount St. Helens.

Doe, John
2006-Mar-14, 02:53 AM
About the Noah's Ark


But at least one man wonders if it could be the remains of Noah's Ark, a vessel said to have been built to save people and selected animals from the Great Flood, the 40 days and 40 nights of deluge as detailed in the Book of Genesis.

The Genesis blueprint of the Ark detailed the structure as 6:1 length to width ratio (300 cubits by 50 cubits). The anomaly, as viewed by satellite, is close to that 6:1 proportion.


The face of the anomaly measured 1,015 feet (309 meters) across, Franz said. "I also found the shape of the anomaly appears to fit on a circle. I am not sure what this means, if anything, but I find it curious."

Used wikipedia for a reference, apparently there were a lot of different cubits, the one most likely used by ancient Israelites was around 420mm but the longest one I found referenced was 650mm so I used that to convert 300 by 50 cubits to modern times, came up with 195m by 32.5 meters.

So if we're using the bible as a reference this anomaly is obviously too big to be the ark at 309m by 50m (using 6:1 ratio claimed).

NEOWatcher
2006-Mar-14, 01:42 PM
It's a shame they didn't give any information on the wrong answers - it would have been nice to learn a bit about the real Martian geologic eras. And surely they could have told anyone stupid enough to pick "Kryptonite" that it doesn't exist!
That might be a little to educational for CNN. Besides, it takes knowledge.

But it isn't too dumb - a couple of the questions are tough. And I hadn't realised Mars's moons were named after "fear" and "panic" (although fear should have been obvious if I'd ever bothered to give it a second thought :doh: ).
Maybe I was a little harsh, but I was expecting questions about Mars, and not about things remotely related to Mars. Cute's ok, but MM was getting too far out of context for me.:silenced:

As for Noah's Ark... Someone started a specific thread here. (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=39260)

parallaxicality
2006-Mar-14, 02:33 PM
Mars is more than just a planet, it's a cultural phenomenon as well. HG Wells and Looney Tunes have as much relevance to our modern understanding of Mars as Spirit and Oppotunity.

Plus everyone should know why Marvin wanted to blow up the Earth! ;)

I did get the last one wrong though.