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ToSeek
2003-Mar-10, 04:45 PM
Pluto may lose planet status (http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/03/09/1047144868646.html)

New thoughts on an old topic, from the Sydney Morning Herald.

If they decide Quaoar is a planet, can we change the name to something pronounceable?

Rodina
2003-Mar-10, 04:52 PM
Booo! Boooooo!

Pluto's grandfathered in, dangnummit!

(Sort of a peculiar headline, since its mostly about one guy's campaign to broaden the definition of "planet")

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Rodina on 2003-03-10 11:58 ]</font>

Glom
2003-Mar-10, 05:23 PM
I say get it over and done with. Eight planet and a **** load of KBOs.

Rift
2003-Mar-10, 05:41 PM
Poor Clyde Tombaugh...

Glom
2003-Mar-10, 05:45 PM
Why? He discovered a planet. Good for him. He discovered the first Kuiper Belt Object. Legend!

kilopi
2003-Mar-10, 07:04 PM
On 2003-03-10 11:45, ToSeek wrote:
Pluto may lose planet status (http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/03/09/1047144868646.html)

New thoughts on an old topic, from the Sydney Morning Herald.
Search on Basri (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?mode=viewtopic&topic=326&forum=2&start=50). /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

And there is this comment from that article: "According to Professor Basri's definition, a planet must orbit a star, not another planet, and it must be round. That means it must be 700 kilometres in diameter, when gravity moulds it into a sphere, or bigger. Smaller objects are potato-shaped." If he's going to say Ceres satisfies that definition, how does he explain this view of Ceres (http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/~jhora/mirac/ceres.html)? It's seems to be far from spherical.

aurorae
2003-Mar-10, 07:47 PM
On 2003-03-10 14:04, kilopi wrote:
If he's going to say Ceres satisfies that definition, how does he explain this view of Ceres (http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/~jhora/mirac/ceres.html)? It's seems to be far from spherical.


Yah, and Jupiter is squashed in shape, so it must not be a planet. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

It would be interesting to obtain closeup pictures of Ceres to see what it really looks like.

irony
2003-Mar-10, 08:08 PM
On 2003-03-10 11:45, ToSeek wrote:

If they decide Quaoar is a planet, can we change the name to something pronounceable?


I've already decided that my first KBO will be called "Ragun D'Mezeges." Points to anybody who can guess how to pronounce it. Major points if you happen to know which amazingly obscure bit of sci-fi it is a reference to. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

g99
2003-Mar-10, 09:04 PM
On 2003-03-10 15:08, irony wrote:


On 2003-03-10 11:45, ToSeek wrote:

If they decide Quaoar is a planet, can we change the name to something pronounceable?


I've already decided that my first KBO will be called "Ragun D'Mezeges." Points to anybody who can guess how to pronounce it. Major points if you happen to know which amazingly obscure bit of sci-fi it is a reference to. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif




Let me try:
http://www.ainself.net/blueriver/anime/disc5.html
EPISODE SEVENTEEN - "Universal Guardians Explode" of some anime cartoon. The page is wayyyy to slow so i can't figure out the cartoon. Just the episode.
Ahhh...The power of google.

Kaptain K
2003-Mar-10, 09:05 PM
kilopi,
That image is not only lo-res, but also low contrast. It could be a rendering of light and dark areas on an otherwise more nearly spherical body.

_________________
"There's a whole lotta things I've never done, but I ain't never had too much fun."
Commander Cody and the Lost Planet Airmen

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Kaptain K on 2003-03-10 16:07 ]</font>

g99
2003-Mar-10, 09:05 PM
My first name for a KBO would be Serious Sam. Point for this not too obscure reference. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

kilopi
2003-Mar-10, 09:05 PM
On 2003-03-10 14:47, aurorae wrote:
Yah, and Jupiter is squashed in shape, so it must not be a planet. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif
I know that's a joke, but I just want to point out that the effects of rotation are generally included in all such definitions. In other words, if it is rotating, the surface should approximate the surface of rotation, to satisfy the "sphericity" criteria.

Ceres doesn't seem to do that--is it rotating fast enough to produce such an elongation?

kilopi
2003-Mar-10, 09:12 PM
On 2003-03-10 16:05, Kaptain K wrote:
kilopi,
That image is not only lo-res, but also low contrast. It could be a rendering of light and dark areas on an otherwise more nearly spherical body.
Ah, my mistake.

The text at that link even implies that the optical views show a uniformly smooth spherical shape.

Perhaps my old posts were wrong about the non-sphericity of other asteroids, too?

PS: The Asteroid Fact Sheet (http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/factsheet/asteroidfact.html) now lists Ceres as 960 x 932, which is almost as much as Earth's deviation due to its fast rotation--and the Earth has more than ten times the diameter. So, maybe Ceres wouldn't qualify after all.

<font size=-1>[ Added PS ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: kilopi on 2003-03-10 16:19 ]</font>

irony
2003-Mar-11, 12:19 AM
On 2003-03-10 16:04, g99 wrote:
Let me try:
http://www.ainself.net/blueriver/anime/disc5.html
EPISODE SEVENTEEN - "Universal Guardians Explode" of some anime cartoon. The page is wayyyy to slow so i can't figure out the cartoon. Just the episode.
Ahhh...The power of google.


That doesn't count... that's my website.


_________________
"Went all the way to the Gap of Rohan only to discover that there is no Gap in Rohan... not even a Banana Republic!"

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: irony on 2003-03-10 19:24 ]</font>

Chuck
2003-Mar-11, 03:35 AM
Gas giants and large rocky bodies are nothing alike and should not all be classified as planets. I propose that Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune be reclassified as subdwarf stars. That makes the solar system a quintuple star system. The bodies orbiting the gas giants are now circling stars and are promoted to planets and asteroids depending on size. Their rings are asteroid belts. Phobos and Deimos are asteroids. Pluto, Charon, and all the other junk beyond Neptune are Kuiper Belt Objects.

The solar system now has lots and lots of planets. Earth is the largest planet and the only planet with a moon. That makes us doubly special. Everyone should be happy to switch to this scheme.

irony
2003-Mar-11, 03:57 AM
Hmm... what if we only call the gas giants 'planets'? Then we get to be the largest double asteroid in the solar system!

Lexx_Luthor
2003-Mar-11, 04:50 AM
pumpkin

g99
2003-Mar-11, 05:41 AM
On 2003-03-10 19:19, irony wrote:


On 2003-03-10 16:04, g99 wrote:
Let me try:
http://www.ainself.net/blueriver/anime/disc5.html
EPISODE SEVENTEEN - "Universal Guardians Explode" of some anime cartoon. The page is wayyyy to slow so i can't figure out the cartoon. Just the episode.
Ahhh...The power of google.


That doesn't count... that's my website.

Really? I didn't know. Do you know why it was crawling by?

You didn't say the rules by the way. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: g99 on 2003-03-11 00:41 ]</font>

Reacher
2003-Mar-11, 11:33 AM
Woah! did that original article say "Anglo-Australian?" it may mean something which i am completely not getting, but, i have certainly never heard that word before!if it is refering to the native Australian people, I have never heard them called anything but "Aboriginals," or "Aborigines"

informant
2003-Mar-11, 12:08 PM
Another way would be to keep the word "planet" with a broad meaning, but come up with other, more technical terms to describe the several categories of "planets".

SeanF
2003-Mar-11, 02:30 PM
On 2003-03-11 06:33, Reacher wrote:
Woah! did that original article say "Anglo-Australian?" it may mean something which i am completely not getting, but, i have certainly never heard that word before!if it is refering to the native Australian people, I have never heard them called anything but "Aboriginals," or "Aborigines"


You're talking about this:



Geoff Marcy, a member of the Anglo-Australian planet search team at Siding Springs telescope . . .


I would guess the facility at Siding Springs is a joint venture between Great Britain and Australia, hence Anglo-Australian. Anglo means English or British, so it would most certainly not be referring in any way to the Aborigines. It's possible that Anglo-Australian is used in reference to the Caucasian population of Australia to distinguish them from the Aborigines, but that doesn't seem likely in this context.