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View Full Version : Astrophoto: The Planet Jupiter by Mike Salway



Fraser
2006-Mar-22, 04:33 AM
SUMMARY: Thirty years ago the clearest views of the planet Jupiter could only be obtained from multi-million dollar robotic space probes, like the twin Voyager missions sent to survey the outer planets. As recently as five years ago, the atmosphere still hopelessly blurred views of Jupiter, or any other planet, seen from the surface of the Earth through telescopes. All of that has changed thanks to the digital revolution in photography. Now, people with the interest, a modest telescope and a common web camera can learn to take planetary portraits that rival some the best from NASA.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/jupiter_032006.html)
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antoniseb
2006-Mar-22, 01:04 PM
That is really cool that he's taking lots of brief images and just using the sharp ones. I read about that technique in the big scopes, but we can do it too. Nice.

tegwilym
2006-Mar-22, 05:55 PM
Bad winter here for planets so far. Clouds and lousy seeing. Arrggh!
Waiting, waiting, waiting...for stable seeing and clearing. :mad:
http://www.eastsideastro.org/observatory

Tom

dragonmaster_us@hotmail.com
2006-Mar-22, 06:35 PM
I applaud your patience. A beautiful result.

turbo-1
2006-Mar-23, 01:09 AM
Mike, you are my hero! I have a 6" APO refractor (Astro-Physics) and am trying to find money in my budget to justify a permanent observatory. If I can get reasonable results without buying a SBIG camera (or equivalent) it would significantly alter the dynamics of the cost/benefit ratio.

iceman
2006-Mar-23, 02:21 AM
Thanks guys!

I used a rusty tubed GSO 10" Dob and a cheap ToUcam webcam to take those images. So for planetary imaging, you don't need expensive equipment.

Your scope with an SBiG would take amazing deep sky images though.

ToSeek
2006-Mar-23, 03:09 PM
For us old-timers, those are just unbelievable shots. I grew up with a Jupiter that was, until Pioneer 10, a bunch of blurry bands with one big spot. To get this kind of imagery from Earth is amazing!