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m63.sunflower.galaxy
2006-Mar-24, 04:31 PM
I'm writing a research paper on whether the Orion Nebula is a good canidate for housing an earth-like planet.
My question relates to the fairly new theory of the formation of the solar system and its relation to the orion nebula. Acording to the theory, our solar system would have been forming by a super-massive star. It went supernova after plaitesimals formed, and enriched them. (see universe today article http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/new_theory_solar_system_formation.html) This is a simmilar environment to the Orion Nebula. My questions:

1. how could a forming solar system survive the shockwaves from the supernova?
2. Does anyone have any resources that might help me find out if the Orion Nebula is a good canidate for an earth-like planet?

Thanks so much!:razz:

George
2006-Mar-24, 10:42 PM
I'm writing a research paper on whether the Orion Nebula is a good canidate for housing an earth-like planet.
My question relates to the fairly new theory of the formation of the solar system and its relation to the orion nebula. Acording to the theory, our solar system would have been forming by a super-massive star. It went supernova after plaitesimals formed, and enriched them. (see universe today article http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/new_theory_solar_system_formation.html) This is a simmilar environment to the Orion Nebula. My questions:

1. how could a forming solar system survive the shockwaves from the supernova?
2. Does anyone have any resources that might help me find out if the Orion Nebula is a good canidate for an earth-like planet?
I doubt I qualify for the level of help needed, but...

Apparently, Iron-60 favors a local supernova just prior to our solar system's formation. However, there is some chance cool red giants (no longer main sequence stars) can produce this isotope also. [more here (http://www.psrd.hawaii.edu/May03/SolarSystemTrigger.html). ]

A sn shockwave should help trigger the collapse of a cloud region, initiating stellar and planetary formation. No doubt the distance from the sn has a lot to say as to the cloud condition after the blast.

The UT article mentions the pre-sn condition where the intense uv from a blue-hot giant limits the time frame of formation. Again, a distance issue.

I will guess the following...If the cloud is not too close or too far from the sn, and if the cloud is massive enough to allow longer errosion time, then you have a star and planets. Setting all the initial conditions to make an Earth is not known, no doubt.

As for no. 2...
You might like this article (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/newsdesk/archive/releases/1994/24). [click on "Release Text" button for article.] The exact recipe to cook-up and Earth is not remotely ready for publication. However, I do remember a book called "To Serve Man" (nevermind, that was a cook book!). ;)
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[Added: BTW, for the deeper esoteric disk theorists, what color was the disk with such a pre-supernova neighbor? ]

Kaptain K
2006-Mar-24, 11:19 PM
There are (at present) no Earth like planets in the Orion nebula. It is an active star forming region. The oldest stars are only a few tens of millions of years old. Any (would be) planets are still in the process of forming. If you want "Earth-like", you'll have to wait a couple of billion years. :whistle:

cress
2006-Mar-25, 02:04 AM
Just thought I would add that you're both quite correct. Distance from the sn probably isn't really that sensitive, although obviously you don't want to be too close.

"Just add iron and a scattering of other heavy elements, mix thoroughly, and leave to simmer for about 5 million years."

Man, I love those Hubble proplyd images.

folkhemmet
2006-Mar-25, 02:28 AM
That is an interesting topic for a research paper. For more info on the possibility of planet formation in the Orion nebula visit Henry Throop's web page and/or the astrophysics preprint archive. In particular, go to http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0411647 and read "Can photo-evaporation trigger planetesimal formation?" A few years ago people were worried that the large and violent O and B stars in OB associations where 90 % of all stars form may inhibit planet formation by destroying the protoplanetary disks. SETI people were worried about this as well for obvious reasons--this would be another limiting factor in the Drake equation. Now astronomers think these environments may actual aid rather than inhibit planet formation. This more recent take agrees better with the determination of planet frequency from microlensing searches--that is, fp= 0.37 +0.30-0.21 (90% confidence). So if I had to make a guess based on all of the available evidence, I would say that right now 1500 or so light years away in Orion many new solar systems are forming.

cress
2006-Mar-25, 02:34 AM
As an aside, I would add that sn's are probably most important for metal-seeding and triggering cloud collapse - and hence star+planet formation - in the first place. Their effect on existing discs shouldn't be too much bother - the timing would need to be very (un)lucky, to catch them as they were 'vulnerable'.

m63.sunflower.galaxy
2006-Mar-25, 11:27 PM
Thanks so much guys for all the help and ideas! It has really changed the direction of my paper. It seems as though all the things that I thought were going to hinder planet formation are really helping. :lol: Also, the links are great resources!

I have another question if that is quite all right. I see that John Bally was a key resource in the link that folkhemmet mentioned. I saw him speak a week ago and his work seems like it would really help with the paper. Does anyone know where I could get a hold of some of his papers? I realize he has a book coming out, but not untill June (way past when my paper is due :( ).

Thanks again!

antoniseb
2006-Mar-25, 11:29 PM
Does anyone know where I could get a hold of some of his papers?
Arxiv?