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View Full Version : A Nearby Twin of the Sun



Fraser
2006-Mar-25, 04:55 AM
SUMMARY: When astronomers start searching for evidence of live orbiting other stars, they'll start with familiar terrain: other stars like our Sun. Astronomers from the Australian National University have identified a nearby candidate that's a virtual twin of our Sun in age, size, temperature and chemistry; although, it doesn't have the same mass. The star, HD98618, is located 126 light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major (the Big Dipper), and is bright enough to see with binoculars.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/nearby_twin_sun.html)
What do you think about this story? post your comments below.

ioresult
2006-Mar-25, 09:07 AM
Hey Fraser, you should read better:

"This solar twin doesn’t only have the same mass as the Sun..."

That means it HAS the same mass as the Sun!

Zen3P0
2006-Mar-26, 02:09 AM
It will be interesting to see if any planets are orbiting.

Antonn

antoniseb
2006-Mar-26, 02:51 AM
It will be interesting to see if any planets are orbiting.

It will be a while till we can see them.

George
2006-Mar-29, 02:01 AM
From a subsequent email exchange, they do not have a color image. :( However, they would like one as they know it is not orange.

So, heliochromology is still a difficult discipline. :)

slorbtop
2006-Mar-30, 01:25 AM
hey fraser. typo just in that first line:
"When astronomers start searching for evidence of live orbiting other stars,..."
It should be "life", right?

thanks

George
2006-Mar-30, 08:46 PM
hey fraser. typo just in that first line:
"When astronomers start searching for evidence of live orbiting other stars,..."
It should be "life", right?

thanks

It is a test for newcomers. I use it quit often. ;)

BTW, Welcome to BAUT. :clap:

George
2006-Apr-02, 08:59 PM
BTW, the coordinates for this 8th magnitude whitish(?) star (possibly bluish white) is...

ra.... 11 hr. 21.5 min.
dec... 58 deg 28 min.

Does the Sloan Survey cover this region yet?

Phantom_Quark
2006-Apr-03, 05:10 PM
I am intregued to find that our sun has a twin! gets you thinking about planets that may be orbiting that sun.. maybe we aren't alone..

George
2006-Apr-03, 10:26 PM
I am intregued to find that our sun has a twin! gets you thinking about planets that may be orbiting that sun.. maybe we aren't alone..
Welcome to the Board. :clap:

18 Scorpi is another, and slightly closer, solar twin. There are likley numerous solar twins out there but determining all the variables to assure twinhood is no easy task.

The Sun is a G class star (surface temp. of about 6000K). Other classes of stars, hotter and colder, can have planetary systems, too.

Denis12
2006-Apr-03, 10:58 PM
It is clear outside now ,i will find and see the solar twin this night. Is it visible with the unaided eye? Is it easy to find ,and where do i have to look? Can you react quickly because i will find and see him this night. Thank you very much.

George
2006-Apr-03, 11:17 PM
On a very dark night, you might be able to see dim stars as weak as 6th magnitude. [I doubt I can anymore.] Each magnitude represents a difference of light flux (flow of photons if you will) of about 2.5 times. Therefore, the twin you wish to see would need to be about 6 times brighter (two magnitudes) for it to be barely visible to the naked eye.

If you have good binoculars or a telescope, you could see it. Google for "star charts" and use the coordinates I gave above to find its location along with the brighter neighboring stars to use as reference.