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View Full Version : Dropping a probe in jupiters hydrogen oceans



VenusROVER
2006-Mar-27, 12:06 AM
How the heck will we do this anyone give me some ideas

antoniseb
2006-Mar-27, 12:16 AM
I'm not sure what you're talking about. Hydrogen Oceans? Probes can only go just so far into Jupiter, since the temperature gets up above the melting point of all known solids very quickly on your way down. Also, if you get too far down, it migh not be possible to get a signal out.

VenusROVER
2006-Mar-27, 12:22 AM
I know what you mean but it could be done somehow. Perhaps some sort of super metal.

antoniseb
2006-Mar-27, 12:30 AM
it could be done somehow.
Really? How can you say that? Tell me how it could be done. What kind of "supermetal" could avoid melting at 10,000K in a dense atmosphere?

VenusROVER
2006-Mar-27, 12:32 AM
LEt me think for a second ok

VenusROVER
2006-Mar-27, 12:34 AM
Ok!

Launch window
2006-Mar-27, 12:44 AM
Droping a probe that can survive in Jupiter is not on, while I think your young enthusiasm for space is great I know some of your young ideas won't go and sending a probe down through just isn't going to happen. For example the mean surface temperature of our Sun is about 6000C, as your craft falls through jupiter it gets melted and crush by forces which have been never seen before, temperatures deep within jupiter can range from 7000C to 14,000C.

However the fact that a probe would be destroyed didn't stop mankind from trying to explore Jupiter, the Galileo craft tried this ( after exploring the Jupiter Moons ) beofre it was destroyed it collected some important information on the atmosphere of giant
http://spaceflightnow.com/galileo/030921galileogone.html

VenusROVER
2006-Mar-27, 12:47 AM
I must think harder how to do such a thing

ryanmercer
2006-Mar-27, 01:21 PM
I know what you mean but it could be done somehow. Perhaps some sort of super metal.


Stop asking stupid quesitons
Stop watching stupid movies like "The Core"

mantiss
2006-Mar-27, 02:07 PM
How the heck will we do this anyone give me some ideas

1) Within current and foreseeable future it's highly unlikely you can find anything that could do that.

2) What for? We can achieve such pressures in labs nowadays (even if for minuscule amounts of time) at a fraction of the cost. What would be the purpose anyways? Sounds like a wastebin for $$ Actually some might consider this reply was a waste of bytes in the first place :whistle:

VenusROVER
2006-Apr-06, 12:55 AM
why not it would help us learn alot about Jupiter

antoniseb
2006-Apr-06, 01:15 AM
why not it would help us learn alot about Jupiter
Usually with these missions, scientists have to make some specific claims about what exactly they expect to learn. Do you have any idea what you expect to learn from such a mission? Can you give some kind of cost-benefit analysis?

VenusROVER
2006-Apr-06, 01:59 AM
sure YOUR LANDING ON JUPITER MAN ...................................JUPITER!!!!!!!! !!!!11

Metricyard
2006-Apr-06, 02:06 AM
Well, we could send a spherical probe full of hydrogen atoms into it .

We could place bets how deep it would get before it went critical.

Be a great way to test the atmosphere too. Think of the shock waves you could create and measure.

VenusROVER
2006-Apr-06, 02:08 AM
ya exactly listen to Metricyard you guys could learn alot from him

Omicron Persei 8
2006-Apr-06, 02:10 AM
Well, we could send a spherical probe full of hydrogen atoms into it .

We could place bets how deep it would get before it went critical.

Be a great way to test the atmosphere too. Think of the shock waves you could create and measure.

I seriously doubt there would be even crushing. The container would rupture before any sort of nuclear compression happened...not that a small spherical probe exploding would be noticeable from orbit...

Metricyard
2006-Apr-06, 02:24 AM
I seriously doubt there would be even crushing. The container would rupture before any sort of nuclear compression happened...not that a small spherical probe exploding would be noticeable from orbit...

Sorry, should have added a smiley :) I was just being goofy.

But, if the probe was big enough, I don't see why you couldn't measure it in some way. Shoemaker-Levy 9's impact was easily observed from small earth telescopes. Granted, the fragments were about 2km in diameter, but a probe orbiting Jupiter should be able to keep track of it. For a little while anyways. A very little while.

Of course, at the present time, landing on the surface (assuming there is one) is pretty much out of the question with our present technology.

Omicron Persei 8
2006-Apr-06, 02:29 AM
Sorry, should have added a smiley :) I was just being goofy.

Ahh don't encourage him! ;)


But, if the probe was big enough, I don't see why you couldn't measure it in some way. Shoemaker-Levy 9's impact was easily observed from small earth telescopes. Granted, the fragments were about 2km in diameter, but a probe orbiting Jupiter should be able to keep track of it. For a little while anyways. A very little while.

Remember, too, that they also hit the planet at an increadible velocity as well. The amount of energy released was far larger than anything seen by humans before in the solar system.

And also remember we did drop an atmospheric probe into Jupiter. It didn't have to be very big either.

Metricyard
2006-Apr-06, 02:42 AM
Ahh don't encourage him! ;)

Sorry, couldn't resist.


Remember, too, that they also hit the planet at an increadible velocity as well. The amount of energy released was far larger than anything seen by humans before in the solar system.

Good point.


And also remember we did drop an atmospheric probe into Jupiter. It didn't have to be very big either.

Another good point. But wouldn't another probe that was able to "float down" to test the atmosphere? Galileo was pretty much rammed into the atmoshpere, without much time to do any real study.

Or do we already have a pretty good grasp of the atmospheres make up of Jupiter?


Edit -- fix quotes

Omicron Persei 8
2006-Apr-06, 03:01 AM
Or do we already have a pretty good grasp of the atmospheres make up of Jupiter?

Eh, we could always learn more. I'd say use a buoyant blimp-like probe if you really want hang time.

VenusROVER
2006-Apr-06, 03:28 AM
you guys [Expletive deleted by moderator] wont let me sware.

Hamlet
2006-Apr-06, 02:55 PM
Another good point. But wouldn't another probe that was able to "float down" to test the atmosphere? Galileo was pretty much rammed into the atmoshpere, without much time to do any real study.

Or do we already have a pretty good grasp of the atmospheres make up of Jupiter?


There was a "float down" probe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galileo_probe#Galileo.27s_atmospheric_entry_probe) launched from Galileo that did study the atmosphere. It floated down through the atmosphere on a parachute and managed to send back about an hours worth of data.