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View Full Version : SETI: one in 10,000 chance signals from ET



RafaelAustin
2003-Mar-14, 03:14 PM
SETI is getting a chance to review it's top 150 candidate signals:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/03/030314071113.htm

Personally I think the chances are much less than this, but I'm glad they have the opportunity to be thourough. They only get 24 hours at Arecibo Observatory to double check as many as they can. Plus they announce an update to the SETTI screensaver program, called "BOINC".

P.S. How's my sensational topic headline? Am I ready for CNN? /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

logicboy
2003-Mar-14, 03:57 PM
On 2003-03-14 10:14, RafaelAustin wrote:
SETI is getting a chance to review it's top 150 candidate signals:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/03/030314071113.htm

Personally I think the chances are much less than this, but I'm glad they have the opportunity to be thourough. They only get 24 hours at Arecibo Observatory to double check as many as they can. Plus they announce an update to the SETTI screensaver program, called "BOINC".

P.S. How's my sensational topic headline? Am I ready for CNN? /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif



NO this is CNN headlining " 1 in 10000 chance signals from ET at near light speed "

Hope they find something interesting. Thanks for the Seti update, I wonder if they fixed some bugs.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: logicboy on 2003-03-14 10:58 ]</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: logicboy on 2003-03-14 10:58 ]</font>

ToSeek
2003-Mar-19, 05:01 PM
Scientists focus search for ET on 150 stars (http://www.floridatoday.com/news/space/stories/2003a/031903seti.htm)

Another article on the same subject, from Florida Today.

RafaelAustin
2003-Mar-19, 05:55 PM
Well, nothing obvious so far...

The Planetary Society:
First Observation Session Completed at Arecibo; Still Searching for ET (http://www.planetary.org/stellarcountdown/reobservations_5.html)

March 18, 2003: The SETI@home team has completed the first of its three 8-hour observation session at Arecibo, designed to revisit the most promising candidate signals detected so far by SETI@home. "We had a good run" said SETI@home chief scientist Dan Werthimer. "Quick looks at the data don't show any signs of ET" he added, "but we are only doing very preliminary analysis here." All the data from the observations is being recorded and sent back to SETI@home headquarters in Berkeley, California, for further analysis.

Edit: This just in...

"March 18, 2003: Due to the eruption of a Solar flare, the final two SETI@home observation sessions at Arecibo have been postponed until probably next week. For the next few days the Arecibo radio telescope will be used to track this rare event on the Sun."

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: RafaelAustin on 2003-03-19 12:58 ]</font>

2003-Mar-20, 10:42 AM
<a name="JD2452719.ESP"> page JD2452719.ESP aka Enforced Stupidity, Please
On 2003-03-19 12:55, RafaelAustin wrote:
Well, nothing obvious so far...
it was pretty obvious to me {YEARS AGO}
UC Berkeley home page
http://www.berkeley.edu/
home sport of Free BSD
i think i deleted the BSD link {oh well}
google?
how come i cannot delete this? 3:17 A.M. {hmm?}

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: HUb' on 2003-03-20 06:10 ]</font>

ToSeek
2003-Apr-03, 12:31 AM
ET fails to phone home (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/2892269.stm)

ToSeek
2003-Apr-24, 03:49 PM
Is the Search Wishful Thinking or Hubris? (http://www.space.com/searchforlife/shostak_arecibo_4_030424.html)

Thoughtful column by noted SETI researcher Seth Shostak. (I almost write "Seti" Shostak!)

newt
2003-Apr-24, 08:03 PM
There is another more cynical consideration. If we earthlings are "smart" enough to restrict usage (by int'l treaty) of the 1420Mhz/21cm band so coveted by SETI folk, so as not to pollute any possible weak signals, don't you think smarter aliens, also recognizing the importance of the band, would do the same? Nobody transmitting. Everybody listening... and listening...
Cheers.

ToSeek
2003-Apr-24, 08:14 PM
There is another more cynical consideration. If we earthlings are "smart" enough to restrict usage (by int'l treaty) of the 1420Mhz/21cm band so coveted by SETI folk, so as not to pollute any possible weak signals, don't you think smarter aliens, also recognizing the importance of the band, would do the same? Nobody transmitting. Everybody listening... and listening...
Cheers.

That's a common criticism of SETI: we do a lot of listening but hardly any talking. If everyone else is doing likewise, we're not going to have much chance of success.

ToSeek
2003-Jul-25, 05:13 PM
Stellar Countdown (http://www.astrobio.net/news/modules.php?op=modload&amp;name=News&amp;file=article&amp;sid= 535&amp;mode=thread&amp;order=0&amp;thold=0): report on seti@home doublechecking the most promising signals.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2004-Mar-20, 04:22 AM
Those odds are not great but I don't think we on Earth are the only form of like in the universe maybe they should now concentrate their searches on the stars that now have newly discovered planets, someday something will be found, maybe just alien bacteria, but its unlikely that we are alone.

eburacum45
2004-Mar-20, 10:23 AM
If anyone knows which 150 stars SETI have targeted I would be very interested.

If they don't have aliens on them (which is likely) perhaps they would be candidates for colonisation.

Argos
2004-Mar-20, 02:10 PM
Nobody transmitting. Everybody listening... and listening...


These folks think different (http://www.geocities.com/Area51/Dimension/5189/extracom.htm)

CERDIP
2004-Mar-21, 06:59 AM
That's a common criticism of SETI: we do a lot of listening but hardly any talking. If everyone else is doing likewise, we're not going to have much chance of success.

Typical neighbourhood block party. No one wants to be the first to say something. We need an icebreaker.

daver
2004-Mar-22, 06:46 PM
That's a common criticism of SETI: we do a lot of listening but hardly any talking. If everyone else is doing likewise, we're not going to have much chance of success.

Typical neighbourhood block party. No one wants to be the first to say something. We need an icebreaker.

Something like "Woah--I don't know G2 stars could supernova!"?

tracer
2004-Mar-22, 08:03 PM
Plus they announce an update to the SETTI screensaver program, called "BOINC".
A coworker of mine went on sabbatical for 6 months, and left SETI@Home running on his computer. A few days after he left, someone turned the monitor on and left it on. Now, you can see portions of SETI@Home burned in to the screen.

I find it terribly ironic that his screen burn-in was caused by a screen saver. #-o

aurora
2004-Mar-22, 08:45 PM
That's a common criticism of SETI: we do a lot of listening but hardly any talking. If everyone else is doing likewise, we're not going to have much chance of success.

Typical neighbourhood block party. No one wants to be the first to say something. We need an icebreaker.

Something like "Woah--I don't know G2 stars could supernova!"?

Or to really get things going, just do what we do online, start a discussion about politics or religion. :wink:

ToSeek
2004-Mar-22, 10:28 PM
That's a common criticism of SETI: we do a lot of listening but hardly any talking. If everyone else is doing likewise, we're not going to have much chance of success.

Typical neighbourhood block party. No one wants to be the first to say something. We need an icebreaker.

Something like "Woah--I don't know G2 stars could supernova!"?

"So, how many spirals in your DNA?"

newt
2004-Mar-22, 10:33 PM
Thanks Argo. Interesting link.

On the receiving end here, though, the spectrum around 1420 Mhz is close to being put under more stress by proposed Broadband service delivery on the powerlines, and usage by terrestrial commercial enterprises (esp. for the medical community).

The noise floor is expected to be raised very considerably, and is the subject of great concern to HF operators (government and amateur), and also to amateur radio astronomers (SETI-focussed or otherwise).

Search any ham site for more info, like here (http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/HTML/plc/).

While sites like Arecibo should not experience any effect, those non-amateur radio astronomy sites on the North American continent have been proscribed "protection" zones that, in some cases, barely equal the arrays at full size. The effects for amateurs (esp. in urban environments) will be considerably greater.

Cheers. Newt.

One Edit: Just noticed there's a thread happening here (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=12192).