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Colt
2003-Mar-15, 03:09 AM
I was scanning through the textbook in Astronomy today and I came across the section on binary stars.. It showed a faint and fuzzy image (http://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/Cyberia/NumRel/Images/Sirusb_lg.jpg) of Sirius and its companion, Sirius-B. I did not know before this that this was the case with Sirius. I began thinking about what a white dwarf was.

"White dwarfs are stars that have consumed all the fuel normally used for fusion. Most are earth sized objects with at least half the mass of the Sun." -Everything2.com (http://www.everything2.com/index.pl?node=white%20dwarf)

So, if Sirius-A were to explode (nova) would it be possible that Sirius-B would sweep up much of the resulting gases and perhaps refuel itself? Just wondering. -Colt

Kaptain K
2003-Mar-15, 03:44 AM
A more likely scenario is that when Sirius A reaches red giant stage, it will expand to fill its Roche lobe. When that happens, the outer parts of the star will be funneled through the Lagrange point and spiral into the companion. Whether this will result in a re-ignition of the companion as a main sequence star or a star shredding supernova, I don't know.

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<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Kaptain K on 2003-03-14 22:45 ]</font>

Dickenmeyer
2003-Mar-15, 04:10 AM
On 2003-03-14 22:44, Kaptain K wrote:
A more likely scenario is that when Sirius A reaches red giant stage, it will expand to fill its Roche lobe. When that happens, the outer parts of the star will be funneled through the Lagrange point and spiral into the companion. Whether this will result in a re-ignition of the companion as a main sequence star or a star shredding supernova, I don't know.As I understand it, that is a pretty typical type-I supernova situation. There goes the neighborhood.

Kaptain K
2003-Mar-15, 07:20 AM
I stand corrected. Total eclipse of the brain. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif

Vermonter
2003-Mar-15, 01:29 PM
I think Astronomy magazine Feb '03 had an article on there about novas and supernovas. Might help some.