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Fraser
2006-Apr-03, 11:30 PM
SUMMARY: Researchers have harnessed the power one of the world's fastest supercomputers - the Earth Simulator - to model the growth of galaxies in the early Universe. The team simulated the process right from the beginning, shortly after the Big Bang, when clumps of gas came together to form stars which then merged into larger and larger collections, and finally became galaxies. They found that galaxies like the Milky Way probably have the same composition now as they did only a billion years after the Big Bang.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/galaxy_sim.html)
What do you think about this story? post your comments below.

antoniseb
2006-Apr-04, 12:03 PM
Complex simulations are always going to be questioned as confirmation. I'm glad that this simulation supports observations of the early universe. I am not certain that the initial conditions this simulation started with are that accurate a reflection of how galaxy & SMBH formation began.

Jerry
2006-Apr-04, 01:44 PM
This is filling the shoe from the wrong end of the foot. BB theory has ALWAYS maintained there has been a progressive aging of matter from the synthesis to the current epoch. Simulating a situation in which the composition evolved first, leaves two questions begging: Why did aging, in the form of heavy metal production stop, and what energy has been consumed during the last 10 billion years if the composition is not changing?

There is clear evidence in the most distant galaxies we observe that heavy metal levels are high - similar to levels in the local universe (in some cases, higher!). What is not clear is how this becomes evidence of a big bang, which was supposed to explain the current light/heavy - element ratios, and demonstrate gradually decreasing ratios of heavy elements.

In addition, this synthesis ignores emerging X-ray and radio evidence that Lyman break galaxies have similar, if not identical, morphologies to current galaxies.

ToSeek
2006-Apr-04, 07:56 PM
Discussion already underway at http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=40106 .

Gerald Lukaniuk
2006-Apr-05, 01:33 AM
This is filling the shoe from the wrong end of the foot. BB theory has ALWAYS maintained there has been a progressive aging of matter from the synthesis to the current epoch. Simulating a situation in which the composition evolved first, leaves two questions begging: Why did aging, in the form of heavy metal production stop, and what energy has been consumed during the last 10 billion years if the composition is not changing?

There is clear evidence in the most distant galaxies we observe that heavy metal levels are high - similar to levels in the local universe (in some cases, higher!). What is not clear is how this becomes evidence of a big bang, which was supposed to explain the current light/heavy - element ratios, and demonstrate gradually decreasing ratios of heavy elements.

In addition, this synthesis ignores emerging X-ray and radio evidence that Lyman break galaxies have similar, if not identical, morphologies to current galaxies.
Perhaps heavy metals are capable of faster radioactive decay under conditions we have yet to simulate of earth. We assume half life is constant and not affected by outside sources yet we can produce chain reactions with things like slow neutons. Perhaps there is some component of a slow neutron in say dark matter. Test of course could be made perhaps producting a fresh quantity of a radioisope to see in its halfline compares with the same quantity of that material produced in stage. Itf it is an internal clock effect one would think decay would differ but an outside invisible force would degrade both equaly.