PDA

View Full Version : Motorcycles



Vermonter
2006-Apr-04, 03:24 PM
Hey folks, now that it's actually getting warm out; how many people here ride? I have a 1982 Virago XV750, will be selling it to a co-worker so I can buy a newer one, possibly a Ninja 250 or a new Virago 250. What about anyone else?

captain swoop
2006-Apr-04, 03:47 PM
Yamaha R1, Just got it a few weeks ago to replace the Ducati I killed last year.


Zooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oooooooooooom!

farmerjumperdon
2006-Apr-04, 03:59 PM
It's been a while, but I did ride dirt. Hodaka Combat Wombat 125 and Honda XR 250. The Honda was strictly foo-foo; but the Hodaka was one mean little machine. I actually bought it from a friend who raced when he moved up in bikes, it was his race bike. It screamed, and I could easily beat any bike, any size, of the folks that hung around our riding haunts.

I've ridden street a bit on friends bikes, and I took the XR to work a few times; but the streets scare me - too many idiots. Too many friends have been seriously and permanently hurt.

I'll stick to safe stuff like skydiving.

Eric Vaxxine
2006-Apr-04, 04:07 PM
Yamaha R1, Just got it a few weeks ago to replace the Ducati I killed last year.


Zooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oooooooooooom!

In January I bought a Ducati 748 after owning a Monster 600 for 7 years.

Eric Vaxxine
2006-Apr-04, 04:15 PM
the streets scare me - too many idiots. Too many friends have been seriously and permanently hurt.

I'll stick to safe stuff like skydiving.

I agree the roads are dangerous, but I am fearless on dirt bikes (not necessarily a brilliant rider, just fearless). I would certainly be taking more risks off road than on road.

I think skydiving might fix my fear of heights !!??!!

turbo-1
2006-Apr-04, 05:36 PM
'05 Softail w/ EFI, Power Commander, low-restriction pipes, K&N breather. I have put on hundreds of miles this year - lots of them in February and March.

Comixx
2006-Apr-04, 05:42 PM
Been riding since '92...First bike was a Honda Nighthawk 250 (standard), replaced that with a CBR 600 F2 (sport) which I sold when I moved to Europe. Got a Honda Magna 750 (light cruiser) when I got back and rode that for 4 years. Now I'm bike-less, but as soon as my house sells this Spring, I'll be picking up a Triumph Daytona 675 (sport).

tofu
2006-Apr-04, 06:42 PM
I bought a little Honda hawk last year. It's not much but I've been having a lot of fun on it. It's also the first bike I've ever had.

I really like sport bikes, and would like to get one in a few years, but maybe something with a little less fire than your average Ducati. heh. I'll probably just pick up a used Honda CBR or something like that - something around 500 to 600 cc

farmerjumperdon
2006-Apr-04, 07:18 PM
I agree the roads are dangerous, but I am fearless on dirt bikes (not necessarily a brilliant rider, just fearless). I would certainly be taking more risks off road than on road.

I think skydiving might fix my fear of heights !!??!!

Yeah, I crashed my dirt bikes pretty regular - kinda part of the sport if you ride hard. But never more than a broken bone. I didn't ride often enough or long enough to be great or anything, but like you said - fearless. I was probably just the guy the least concerned of crashing.

The one time I went out on trails shared by 4-wheeled vehicles, I got creamed by a pick-up. Broadsided me at 35-40 miles per hour. And everyone I know that has ridden for any appreciable length of time has been gotten by a careless driver or two. Four right off the top of my head that suffered significant permanent damage. Too bad, cause it is so much fun.

Jumping generally doesn't help with fear of heights. The ground is so far away (2 to 3 miles) that it really doesn't register. It's more like going into suspension, after you hit terminal velocity. You can actually forget you're falling once you are no longer accelerating - which is why discipline regarding altitude awareness is so critical.

Bob
2006-Apr-04, 07:46 PM
I have a 1982 Virago XV750

Virago seems like an odd name for a powerful motorcycle. Virago means "a loud, overbearing woman" - probably not the image you want to project. Do you think it's a case of a Japanese company not getting quite the translation into English that it wants?

turbo-1
2006-Apr-04, 08:47 PM
I bought a little Honda hawk last year. It's not much but I've been having a lot of fun on it. It's also the first bike I've ever had.

I really like sport bikes, and would like to get one in a few years, but maybe something with a little less fire than your average Ducati. heh. I'll probably just pick up a used Honda CBR or something like that - something around 500 to 600 ccCheck with your insurance company before settling on the displacement. There is often a rate hike right around the 600cc range. Some may nail you with the higher rates at 600cc, but maybe your particular carrier will tag you only if you go over 600cc.

tofu
2006-Apr-04, 08:50 PM
Yeah, I crashed my dirt bikes pretty regular - kinda part of the sport if you ride hard. But never more than a broken bone.

How many bones have you broken?

I'm kind of embarrassed about this since I haven't even been riding a full year yet, but I've already broken my collar bone.


Check with your insurance company before settling on the displacement. There is often a rate hike right around the 600cc range. Some may nail you with the higher rates at 600cc, but maybe your particular carrier will tag you only if you go over 600cc.

thx for the tip.

Vermonter
2006-Apr-04, 09:52 PM
Virago seems like an odd name for a powerful motorcycle. Virago means "a loud, overbearing woman" - probably not the image you want to project. Do you think it's a case of a Japanese company not getting quite the translation into English that it wants?

Yeah, I think it was an odd translation. The word itself sounds cool, though.

I looked up insurance today (from Progrssive) for several beginner bikes. Standard full insurance for a Kawasaki Ninja 250R ($100 comp/250 coll) for me was approaching $1800 a year. A new Honda Rebel or Yamaha Virago (250cc each) with the same insurance specs? Less than $500 a year. I'm rather irritated at this point, but I'll be talking to my parent's insurance agency (Allstate) and see if I can get a discount for having a pretty clean record (1 speeding ticket three years ago) and because we have several cars on our policy.

jt-3d
2006-Apr-05, 01:02 AM
I had an XT200 way back in the mid 80s. Sold it with the intention of getting a bigger dual. I got a wife instead and she insisted that I'd get killed on a bike. Oh well. So anyway, recently she has OK'd me for a bike after we pay the van off. I guess now that the kids are older, I'm expendable. http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon10.gif Anyway, I'm looking at getting a KLR650 soon. Maybe the Honda but I still favor the KLR. If only Yamaha still big dual purpose aka sport bikes. Anyway, ask me in a couple months.

farmerjumperdon
2006-Apr-05, 12:47 PM
Virago seems like an odd name for a powerful motorcycle. Virago means "a loud, overbearing woman" - probably not the image you want to project. Do you think it's a case of a Japanese company not getting quite the translation into English that it wants?

That's pretty good, very funny. Better than a car named a Nova..

farmerjumperdon
2006-Apr-05, 01:05 PM
How many bones have you broken?

I'm kind of embarrassed about this since I haven't even been riding a full year yet, but I've already broken my collar bone.

thx for the tip.

My turn for embarassment. I've broken so many digits I can't even remember. Both thumbs, which I remember because it makes your hand pretty useless for a while. With a dirt bike, if you ride hard, and especially while on the steep part of the learning curve, you slide out a lot (we built up a few good berms - but most of the turns on our track were pretty flat). I seemed to always be getting my hands either caught under the bars, or twisted up as you reach for the ground in the fall. Both ankles, one at a time thank goodness. I never did own a pair of proper riding boots.

I busted a collarbone too; not riding though. Playing King-of-the-Hill on a big pile of haybales. Man that hurt. It was a very complete fracture. When I hit the ground it sounded just like somebody taking a good size stick of dry wood and breaking it over their knee. The thought still makes me cringe.

Warning to youngsters participating in extreme or high impact sports: There is a reason most people stop in their mid-30's. Keeps you from being crippled with arthritis later in life.

Maksutov
2006-Apr-05, 01:30 PM
Back in college I had a Ducati. Nice bike, 249cc, left those folks messing around on their 125cc Broncos in the dust.

Speaking of dust, in the northeast, spring means not only mud, but sand. The sand is left over from the operations to make the roads passable during the winter. One fine spring day I took a corner maybe a bit too sharply, caught sand which I hadn't seen, and hit the curb. I landed first, the bike on top of me, and left most of the skin of my left arm somewhere. BTW, I was wearing a jacket, the leather arm was left back there somewhere too.

That cured me. The Ducati helped with the downpayment on my Mustang.

My son went through the same phase. When he narrowly missed getting wiped out by a grandma in a Lincoln who didn't see him on his bike, he immediately switched to cars.

farmerjumperdon
2006-Apr-05, 01:57 PM
Glad to hear your son escaped the near miss. I'm not there yet, but that's gotta be tough, having been thru it yourself, and seeing your son head down that path. I'm certainly not one to say life must be lived without risk, but the problem I have with riding mixed in with the general public is that your level of risk is linked to too many other people's incompetence.

A friend of mine bought one of the last small Honda in-line 4's; it was either a 350 or a 400, bought around 1977. No lie, first ride, elderly woman didn't look before pulling out. He was doing about 60, but saw she wasn't looking and got it slowed down and layed down before impact. Got away with just a couple broken bones.

Eric Vaxxine
2006-Apr-05, 03:31 PM
I wish they would insist Car Drivers take at least a Basic Training lesson on a motorbike.

I suggest they introduce 'driving while on the phone' tuition for car drivers too.
No one is ever going to stop the public from driving wth one hand on the wheel and one to the ear.

BUT, this is the best one....I saw a car driver with TWO phones, one in both hand, while driving .....
manual gears, Central London, during the rush hours.

Clive Tester
2006-Apr-06, 08:59 PM
Many moons ago, the MZ 125 and 250 were my first road bikes. The MZ of East Germany, shared lineage with Great Britain’s BSA Bantam; Bantams were prevalent in my childhood. I have fond memories; there was something rather compelling in their simplicity.

ciderman
2006-Apr-06, 11:56 PM
Ok guys, been drawn into the fold by this thread after weeks of lurking.
Have suzuki RF900 (big, black, modded, bit lardy these days but can be highly effective), honda CD200 Benly + 2nd for spares! (bought off mate for 50 some 14 years ago, 100mpg, still reliable but handles like jellyfish on acid:sick: , main transport) & XTZ750 (in Auckland NZ, bit inconvienient that!).
So far done about 550,000 miles on two wheels, if you're into biking I can recommend New Zealand above any other place on this good planet:lol:

turbo-1
2006-Apr-07, 12:34 AM
Ok guys, been drawn into the fold by this thread after weeks of lurking.
Have suzuki RF900 (big, black, modded, bit lardy these days but can be highly effective), honda CD200 Benly + 2nd for spares! (bought off mate for 50 some 14 years ago, 100mpg, still reliable but handles like jellyfish on acid:sick: , main transport) & XTZ750 (in Auckland NZ, bit inconvienient that!).
So far done about 550,000 miles on two wheels, if you're into biking I can recommend New Zealand above any other place on this good planet:lol:NZ is pretty, I'll give you that, but Maine has some beautiful mountains, coast, forests, rolling farm country, and is a killer place to ride (literally, when the people from Quebec and Massachusetts come to vacation - you've got to watch them like a hawk if you want to stay alive). They drive like Edith Bunker sings - enthusiastically, with little control.

BTW, I can't believe I'm the only one in the poll with a Harley. I try to live simply without a lot of "stuff" (our house is nice, but tiny, so that's a given) but my prize possessions are my Softail, 6" f:8 Astro Physics refractor, and almost 30 year old hand made Augostino dreadnaught guitar. The Harley would be the last to go (OK, I've got a sweet Taylor 712 backing up the Augostino), with the warm winters Maine has been getting lately, I've been putting on hundreds of miles in months that normally would be reserved for the snowblower. If the temperature is in two digits and starts with a "4" or above, I'm riding.

ciderman
2006-Apr-07, 02:32 AM
Hi there Turbo-1!
Personally I loved biking NZ for the unbelivably twisty, empty & well surfaced roads (wasn't too impressed by the surface finishes in Maine!), but I appreciate that not every one is into that kind of riding.
Traditionally Harleys don't really excell at going around bends(yep I've ridden one) , but there again my Benly is worse & I've seen well ridden Harleys holding better corner speed than Fireblades with 'fair weather only' riders aboard, so its certainly a case of its not what you ride but how you ride it!
Glad to hear you get out whenever conditions allow:clap: , silk inner gloves & strip of electrical insulation tape on front on levers help with thermal control:)
At least you get some dark skies over there, kids in England can barely see the stars up there now:(

captain swoop
2006-Apr-07, 09:45 AM
Best biking road according to all the Polls in Motorcycle News and the monthly mags is the Sotkesley to Helmesley road through Bilsdale on the N Yorks Moors. I don't agree, I live a few miles away in Guisborough and ride it regularly. My fave road is the Pickering to Whitby road. I can do a big circular ride Guis to Stokesley, over to Helmesley, carry on to Pickering, back over the moors to Whitby and then over the hill back to Guisborough.

Lovely, lots of fast twist A and B roads. On a summer weekend there can be several hundred bikes parked on Helmsley market place.

teddyv
2006-Apr-07, 07:30 PM
We recently had a job that we used a pair of TT125 dirtbikes. I basically learned how to ride a dirtbike this way. There's nothing quite like learning how to ride with having an obstacle like several boulder-filled creeks along a deactivated logging road. I guess I learned fast.

All my brother-in-laws (3) had/have sport bikes.

farmerjumperdon
2006-Apr-07, 10:05 PM
Riding dirt bikes on logging roads that are crossed by boulder-strewn creeks sounds like torture. What next, forcing you to drive a Ferrari for a week?

Seriously, what kind of job was it that required you to have fun on a dirt bike?

Dr Nigel
2006-Apr-07, 11:19 PM
I don't ride motorbikes, but my partner did, until she had an accident that ****ed her pelvis.

She had a Suzuki SG350 for the road, and rode an RTS-Weslake 350 in race meetings. This is a specialised grasstrack bike (a bit like speedway, but, you guessed it, on grass - well, it starts off being grass before the first race; after that it's a mix of grass, mud and dust). The Suzuki was a very light bike (about 90 kg dry), but the pillion seat was a killer!

Going to grasstrack meetings used to be a bit scary. Not because my partner was racing, and not because of the bikers (they were a great bunch of people), but because of the sidecars (or "chairs").

Picture, if you will, the engine from an R1 in a home-made lightweight sidecar frame, going around a field at about 80 mph, with the passenger trying to get really friendly with the other side of the back mudguard (to assist weight distribution). Oh, and did I mention the fields were bumpy?

Oh, and Farmerjumerdon, I have driven a Ferrari (Right-hand drive, semiautomatic gearshift, 3.6 L V8 mid-mounted). It was an F360 Modena, and I had the chance to take it for three laps around Thruxton racing circuit. That was sweet. Everything they say about Ferraris is true. I have never before or since been in a vehicle with such poise and balance.

Moose
2006-Apr-08, 04:38 PM
Dad had a 750cc Virago in the 80s. He sold it a few months after some jerk cut him off and forced him to bail.

I've always wanted to get a bike, but as traffic competance has gotten worse rather than better, I'll stick with my armor, thanks.

Chip
2006-Apr-08, 06:00 PM
Dad had a 750cc Virago in the 80s. He sold it a few months after some jerk cut him off and forced him to bail. I've always wanted to get a bike, but as traffic competance has gotten worse rather than better, I'll stick with my armor, thanks.
My situation is similar, my Dad had a black '74 Moto Guzzi Eldorado. Totally fantastic bike. He enjoyed riding it. A highway patrol officer once pulled him over just to talk about motorcycles. Dad finally traded it in for a Jaguar XKE 2+2 which he tinkered with among other cars for a time. The car that knocked me out as a kid belonged to a friend of my Dad, a fighter pilot who occasionally visited us. It was a cobalt blue 1959 Maserati 3500 GT. We also had a lot of weird cars when I was growing up. I like bikes as machines but will stick with cars.

Nonkers
2006-Apr-09, 02:13 AM
In 1978 I test drove a Herkules DKW 2000 Wankel
http://www.chromeclassics.com/1975_hercules.html

Excellent performance, handling and comfort. The engine actually got smoother the faster you went!

The only disadvantage: just like the Ro80 Wankel car of the same era, the engine was only good for 20,000 miles!

Did they ever cure the Wankel's longevity problem? Why aren't Wankels produced today?