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View Full Version : In which constellation can i find Barnards star?



Denis12
2006-Apr-06, 01:25 AM
Is the constellation where Barnards star is visible above the horizon this night? In which constellation is it visible? And is it a unaided eye star? Can you help me? Thanks.

Hamlet
2006-Apr-06, 01:37 AM
Is the constellation where Barnards star is visible above the horizon this night? In which constellation is it visible? And is it a unaided eye star? Can you help me? Thanks.

Barnard's Star is in the constellation Ophiuchus and rises about 23:50 local time. It's not visible with the naked eye.

Denis12
2006-Apr-06, 02:17 AM
It is one of the (nearest) stars but not visible with the unaided eye? That sounds strange? Why is that?

Hamlet
2006-Apr-06, 02:29 AM
It is one of the (nearest) stars but not visible with the unaided eye? That sounds strange? Why is that?

It's not really strange. Barnard's Star is a faint red dwarf with only about 16% of the mass of our Sun. Its luminosity is only about 1/2500 of our Sun. Even though it's a neighbor by interstellar standards, its dimness means it's only visible with a telescope.

Kiwi
2006-Apr-06, 02:41 AM
It is one of the (nearest) stars but not visible with the unaided eye? That sounds strange? Why is that?

Because it's 9th magnitude. Nobody can see any star that dim with the naked eye.

From Guide to Stars and Planets, Ian Ridpath and Wil Tirion, Collins, Glasgow, 1984, page 188:

"Perhaps the most celebrated star in Ophiucus is a 9th magnitude red dwarf too faint to be seen by the naked eye: Barnard's Star, at 6 l.y. away the 2nd-closest to the Sun. It is named after the American astronomer Edward Emerson Barnard, who found in 1916 that it has the greatest proper motion of any star; it covers a distance equal to the apparent diameter of the Moon every 180 years. Barnard's Star is of particular interest because it is believed to have planets."

You can't beat having a few good reference books if you're into astronomy.

Denis12
2006-Apr-06, 02:57 AM
One of the Pioneer spacecrafts is traveling to the constellation Ophuichus and maybe to the neighborhood of Barnards Star ,but it is dissapointing that they are out of working at this moment ,but if they are still functionating until they arrive at the neighborhood of Barnards Star ,one of the Pioneers can us send nice photographs of this red dwarf ,but i think that i am (too) optimistic about that. Is it really on its way to the area of barnards Star?

AGN Fuel
2006-Apr-06, 06:15 AM
One of the Pioneer spacecrafts is traveling to the constellation Ophuichus and maybe to the neighborhood of Barnards Star ,but it is dissapointing that they are out of working at this moment ,but if they are still functionating until they arrive at the neighborhood of Barnards Star ,one of the Pioneers can us send nice photographs of this red dwarf ,but i think that i am (too) optimistic about that. Is it really on its way to the area of barnards Star?

Voyager 1 is heading in the general direction of Ophiuchus. However, given Barnard's Star is 6 light years away (roughly 60,000,000,000,000 km) and Voyager 1 has a current velocity of only around 17km/s relative to the sun, it may take a while before it gets into that neighbourhood. By which time, Barnards Star will have well and truly toddled off (it has a very large proper motion), as well!

gwiz
2006-Apr-06, 07:48 AM
One of the Pioneer spacecrafts is traveling to the constellation Ophuichus and maybe to the neighborhood of Barnards Star ,but it is dissapointing that they are out of working at this moment ,but if they are still functionating until they arrive at the neighborhood of Barnards Star ,one of the Pioneers can us send nice photographs of this red dwarf ,but i think that i am (too) optimistic about that. Is it really on its way to the area of barnards Star?
The Pioneers are already beyond detection range and the Voyagers will be in a few years, long before they get anywhere near a star. "Near" is relative, anyway, none of the probes will come within a light year of a neighbouring star.

Denis12
2006-Apr-06, 01:16 PM
Why dont they come never within a lightyear of a star?

gwiz
2006-Apr-06, 02:42 PM
Because around these parts, stars are several light-years apart. The probes' trajectories are what they were left with after their respective final planetary encounters, not aimed specifically at any star. The odds of one coming close to a near-by star are thus not great, imagine shutting your eyes and shooting at a football field, what are your chances of hitting a player?