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creitz
2006-Apr-06, 03:39 PM
I have just joined this forum, and my initial impression is one of confusion, as most of the messages seem to be incomprehensible and out of context, but I have come across some great nuggets of opinion. My problem is that I have no science background whatsoever, but I am fascinated by cosmology, and I have great difficulty understanding some of the theoretical concepts. My big thing at the moment is the urgent need to devote all our resources and energies to unmanned science exploration, rather than to adventure and exploration. Also, living as I do in Canada, I hope that Americans and the American public recognize that, although NASA has been doing a magnificent job over the years, it is not the only game in town. This was forcefully brought home to me when I saw that wonderful "Nova" documentary on PBS this week about the Cassini-Huygens Project. THAT is what the exploration of space should be all about. Out of respect, I will not comment on the current American administration's budget priorities, but George Bush really will be remembered with respectby the rest of the world in future ages if he channels all available funds to science rather than to adventure and exploration. In addition, the American public should not lose sight of the fact that, although NASA is leading the way, it is only one cog in humanity's giant wheel of research into what it all means, where everything comes from, and where it will all end.

farmerjumperdon
2006-Apr-06, 03:42 PM
Welcome aboard, and yes, that was an excellent program.

JohnW
2006-Apr-06, 03:51 PM
I agree with most of what you said, creitz, but why the distinction between "science" and "adventure and exploration"? Science is adventure and exploration!

NEOWatcher
2006-Apr-06, 04:19 PM
I have just joined this forum, and my initial impression is one of confusion, as most of the messages seem to be incomprehensible and out of context,
Yep; different levels of knowledge, and some jokers (like me?), and some people who are just being combative. You just have to sift out what you need (just don't sift out what you want...we want you to have an open mind)

but I have come across some great nuggets of opinion.

Good

My problem is that I have no science background whatsoever, but I am fascinated by cosmology, and I have great difficulty understanding some of the theoretical concepts.

Which might add to the confusion...

My big thing at the moment is the urgent need to devote all our resources and energies to unmanned science exploration, rather than to adventure and exploration.

Opinion noted. I'm sure you will find all varying degrees of agree/disagree

Also, living as I do in Canada, I hope that Americans and the American public recognize that, although NASA has been doing a magnificent job over the years,

Thank you. I did it all myself :shifty:

it is not the only game in town. This was forcefully brought home to me when I saw that wonderful "Nova" documentary on PBS this week about the Cassini-Huygens Project. THAT is what the exploration of space should be all about.

I agree, but among other things.

Out of respect, I will not comment on the current American administration's budget priorities, but George Bush really will be remembered with respectby the rest of the world in future ages if he channels all available funds to science rather than to adventure and exploration.

Tricky subject, so many opinions, so little agreement. I'm beginning to think that the NASA budget is not only political, but a religious subject for this board.

In addition, the American public should not lose sight of the fact that, although NASA is leading the way, it is only one cog in humanity's giant wheel of research into what it all means, where everything comes from, and where it will all end.
Unfortunately, the public (as a whole) is arrogent, and doesn't understand why we need NASA in the first place.

Staiduk
2006-Apr-06, 05:36 PM
Welcome aboard, Creitz! We need as many Canadians as we can get here to keep the Yanks in line. :D

farmerjumperdon
2006-Apr-06, 07:19 PM
I thought it was the Aussies that most needed to be kept in line.

Don't feel left out though, they probably think it is you.

Staiduk
2006-Apr-06, 07:40 PM
Nope. Definitely the Americans. (http://invadecanada.us/)

We've got our eye on you....
:D

Melusine
2006-Apr-06, 07:45 PM
Originally Posted by creitz
Also, living as I do in Canada, I hope that Americans and the American public recognize that, although NASA has been doing a magnificent job over the years,


Neowatcher: Thank you. I did it all myself :shifty:
Lol. And let's not forget to thank the Belgians...we should always thank the Belgians.

NEOWatcher
2006-Apr-06, 08:20 PM
Lol. And let's not forget to thank the Belgians...we should always thank the Belgians.
Would thanking them occassionally be "waffling" on the subject? ;)

Nicolas
2006-Apr-06, 08:43 PM
We too thank the Powers that Be for giving us good reasons to rebuild our cities from time to time ;).

Seriously though, Belgium is doing nice things in space exploration and development. Just look at me ;) :D.

Welcome to the board, creitz! Are you interested mainly in cosmology, or astronomy?

creitz
2006-Apr-07, 12:10 AM
I was amazed, and most appreciative, at the flood of responses to my first posting. Just by way of clarification: I draw a very firm distinction between manned space flights to Mars and the moon, whose primary purpose, let's face it, is adventure and exploration, and unmanned science expeditions, whose primary purpose is scientific research. This includes planetary, cometary and inter-stellar probes, as well as the installation and maintenance of scientific instruments in space, and in particular, the development of a new generation of space telescopes.

Gruesome
2006-Apr-07, 12:48 AM
I friend of mine was in town from Canada recently. He was berating me on politics [which I shall side-step here], saying that he thought America was the world's bully.


I disagreed. Then I beat him up and took his lunch money. :)

Dragon Star
2006-Apr-07, 12:50 AM
I friend of mine was in town from Canada recently. He was berating me on politics [which I shall side-step here], saying that he thought America was the world's bully.


I disagreed. Then I beat him up and took his lunch money. :)

:D :D

Melusine
2006-Apr-07, 03:22 PM
I was amazed, and most appreciative, at the flood of responses to my first posting. Just by way of clarification: I draw a very firm distinction between manned space flights to Mars and the moon, whose primary purpose, let's face it, is adventure and exploration, and unmanned science expeditions, whose primary purpose is scientific research. This includes planetary, cometary and inter-stellar probes, as well as the installation and maintenance of scientific instruments in space, and in particular, the development of a new generation of space telescopes.
Again, welcome to BAUT, Creitz. You will find threads in the Space Exploration section regarding this, as well on the BA's blog. Future moon expeditions are more than about exploration and adventure; the possibilities of creating bases to launch unmanned spacecraft, and or mine useful materials, or study ways to survive in such a place, are all a bit more than adventure and just exploring for the sake of it (though I have no problem with exploring for the sake of it).

If I had to choose between manned or unmanned, I'd choose unmanned, but I would rather give space agencies more money to do both. :)

Maksutov
2006-Apr-07, 05:46 PM
I friend of mine was in town from Canada recently. He was berating me on politics [which I shall side-step here], saying that he thought America was the world's bully.


I disagreed. Then I beat him up and took his lunch money. :)Hopefully you were kind enough to leave him with his toque, back bacon, and a few cold ones, eh?


Meanwhile, welcome, creitz!

BTW, as one who has been following, and sometimes directly involved with the space program for 50 years, manned and unmanned missions are both capable of exploration and scientific research, and have done so in the past. And, for me at least, any mission is an adventure. although for definition, manned or unmanned, they have to be enjoyed vicariously.