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afterburner
2006-Apr-08, 05:40 PM
What is the fastest a man made object has gone...im loking for the answer related to high speeds in outer space..maybe one of the voyager spacecraft, or some other one. Things like particle accelerators dont count.

Also what is possible with current technologies solar sales and ion propulsion perhaps, or maybe just a HUGE tank of fuel?
Is anyone planning to send a satellite REALLY fast somewhere just to see how fast they can get it to go?

alainprice
2006-Apr-08, 06:05 PM
A clay disc or something like that was once shot at roughly 80 miles a second.

Other than that, the Galileo probe enterred Jupiter's atmosphere at over 170 000 km/h, I believe.

Dragon Star
2006-Apr-08, 06:09 PM
At the moment I thought it was the Pluto fly by satellite? New Horizons is it?

01101001
2006-Apr-08, 06:10 PM
For off-Earth, New Horizons (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/newhorizons/main/index.html) got press.

ABC News: NASA's Pluto probe takes off (http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200601/s1551378.htm)


The engine firings made the probe, called New Horizons, soar at 16 kilometres per second, or 58,000 kilometres per hour - the fastest man-made object ever to leave Earth's orbit.

But...

Aerospace.web: Spacecraft Speed Records (http://www.aerospaceweb.org/question/spacecraft/q0260.shtml)


As the New Horizons launch approached, many news reports hailed the new probe as the fastest spacecraft ever. However, that is not quite correct. We have previously written about two vehicles called Helios launched to study the Sun during the 1970s. Both of these probes attained maximum speeds of around 150,000 mph (250,000 km/h) at closest approach to the Sun in their highly elliptical orbits. Helios 2 was slightly faster than its twin craft, and this probe still holds the speed record as not only the fastest spacecraft but also the fastest manmade object in history.

Sphinx
2006-Apr-08, 06:33 PM
Actually, the fastest man made thing is a laser beam. ;) But we can't travel with it...yet, but we are transfering information with it...fiberobtics, a different form of the utilization of light.

Dragon Star
2006-Apr-08, 06:41 PM
Actually, the fastest man made thing is a laser beam. ;) But we can't travel with it...yet, but we are transfering information with it...fiberobtics, a different form of the utilization of light.

Yes, something like 300*x the speed of light, but we are talking about space objects here.

01101001, that link is not that creditable because of it's last claim that it was the fastest man made object ever, because it is WAY off.

01101001
2006-Apr-08, 07:37 PM
Yes, something like 300*x the speed of light, but we are talking about space objects here.

01101001, that link is not that creditable because of it's last claim that it was the fastest man made object ever, because it is WAY off.

Off-Earth, what man-made is faster than Helios?

Edit: Need a second source? Guiness World Records: FASTEST SPACE SPEED (http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/content_pages/record.asp?recordid=46995)


The NASA-German Helios 1 and 2 solar probes reached 252,800 km/h (158,000 mph) during their orbits of the Sun.

Lord Jubjub
2006-Apr-08, 07:59 PM
Even on-Earth, is there a man-made object that can exceed Mach 214?

Dragon Star
2006-Apr-08, 08:23 PM
Off-Earth, what man-made is faster than Helios?

Edit: Need a second source? Guiness World Records: FASTEST SPACE SPEED (http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/content_pages/record.asp?recordid=46995)

Thank you.:D

Jub, exactly how fast is mach 214?

Regardless, 300x speed of light is a pretty good clip, I doubt nothing is as fast as that.

EDIT: speed of sound is 761MPH at sea level, meaning mach 214 is 162,854MPH, Light moves at roughly 670 million mph, 670 million X 300 is 201,000,000,000 Billion MPH...damn.

Dragon Star
2006-Apr-08, 08:43 PM
Didn't want to edit again...

I think I got this right, but I got that 300x speed of light is Mach 261,968,046.6472.

Try doing that in your geo-metro...rofl.

Sphinx
2006-Apr-08, 08:55 PM
I wasn't aware that there was anything that could go faster than the speed of light. What is it exactly that is going 300x the speed of light? Another questions is this: if anything was going faster than the speed of light wouldn't we not be able to see it?

Dragon Star
2006-Apr-08, 09:06 PM
Well, I could explain it but it's better to let someone who knows what they are talking about tell you...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_light#.22Faster-than-light.22_observations_and_experiments

Clive Tester
2006-Apr-08, 09:13 PM
Believe it or not, aluminium pellets were propelled to solar escape velocity in the late 1950’s. This speed was achieved by firing them with a shaped explosive charge from a Redstone missile at the top of its trajectory. Whether the pellets were fired earthward or spaceward, I would like to know. Can anyone on this forum elaborate?

Denis12
2006-Apr-08, 09:14 PM
Will it ever be possible to travel with (10) times the speed of light? Then you can get to Alpha Centauri in 5 month or so (the same time like a trip to Mars now) And to Sedna in an hour. Then is spacetravel much easier.

Dragon Star
2006-Apr-08, 09:16 PM
No, anything with rest mass (matter) can not travel at luminal or superluminal speeds.

Kaptain K
2006-Apr-08, 10:05 PM
Will it ever be possible to travel with (10) times the speed of light? Then you can get to Alpha Centauri in 5 month or so (the same time like a trip to Mars now) And to Sedna in an hour. Then is spacetravel much easier.
Not without a revolution in physics. As our understanding of physics stands now, nothing (man made or natural) can exceed the speed of light.

BTW - If you can come up with such a revolution, you will also be awarded a free trip to Sweden! :)

Denis12
2006-Apr-08, 11:14 PM
What do you mean with not without a revolution in physics?

Dragon Star
2006-Apr-09, 01:11 AM
What do you mean with not without a revolution in physics?

Because current physics does not support such a possibility.

Kaptain K
2006-Apr-09, 02:57 AM
What do you mean with not without a revolution in physics?
Read the sentence after the one you quoted:


As our understanding of physics stands now, nothing (man made or natural) can exceed the speed of light.

Dragon Star
2006-Apr-09, 03:01 AM
But that is incorrect, Light can exceed the speed of light.

Van Rijn
2006-Apr-09, 06:11 AM
Thank you.:D

Jub, exactly how fast is mach 214?


Just thought I'd mention google can be handy for quick stuff like this.

http://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial_s&hl=en&q=mach+214+in+miles+per+hour&btnG=Google+Search

They have a pretty good calculator: "mach 214 = 162 898.309 miles per hour"

It does quite a few conversions. For example, you can get lightyears in parsecs.

Van Rijn
2006-Apr-09, 06:13 AM
But that is incorrect, Light can exceed the speed of light.

Not faster than the speed of light in a vacuum.

tony873004
2006-Apr-09, 06:36 AM
How about the exhaust velocity from an ion engine?

alainprice
2006-Apr-09, 07:05 AM
Tachyons for the win!!!

Omicron Persei 8
2006-Apr-09, 09:29 AM
Well, I could explain it but it's better to let someone who knows what they are talking about tell you...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_light#.22Faster-than-light.22_observations_and_experiments

The only thing going faster than light is a pattern. No information can travel in this sense and nothing is linearly traveling that fast as well. Think of it this way, if you move a laser across a distant surface, the contact point can appear to move faster than light. In reality only the position of the contact of the beam is changing. There is nothing technically traveling faster than c.

This experiment plays with group velocities and performed the same sort of trick. From the article:

Exceeding the group velocity of light in this manner is comparable to exceeding the speed of sound by arranging people in a distantly spaced line, and asking them all to shout "I'm here!", one after another with short intervals, each one timing it by looking at their own wristwatch so they don't have to wait until they hear the previous person shouting. Another example can be seen when watching ocean waves washing up on shore. With a narrow enough angle between the wave and the shoreline, the breakers travel along the wave's length much faster than the wave's movement inland.

So in reality, although it's a neat concept, there is really no way it can actually be used. The light beam's front velocity or phase velocity never exceed the speed of light and that's what would really count.

WaxRubiks
2006-Apr-09, 09:30 AM
positrons?

Dragon Star
2006-Apr-09, 03:19 PM
The only thing going faster than light is a pattern. No information can travel in this sense and nothing is linearly traveling that fast as well. Think of it this way, if you move a laser across a distant surface, the contact point can appear to move faster than light. In reality only the position of the contact of the beam is changing. There is nothing technically traveling faster than c.

This experiment plays with group velocities and performed the same sort of trick. From the article:

Exceeding the group velocity of light in this manner is comparable to exceeding the speed of sound by arranging people in a distantly spaced line, and asking them all to shout "I'm here!", one after another with short intervals, each one timing it by looking at their own wristwatch so they don't have to wait until they hear the previous person shouting. Another example can be seen when watching ocean waves washing up on shore. With a narrow enough angle between the wave and the shoreline, the breakers travel along the wave's length much faster than the wave's movement inland.

So in reality, although it's a neat concept, there is really no way it can actually be used. The light beam's front velocity or phase velocity never exceed the speed of light and that's what would really count.

Ok, thanks for clearing that up.:D

Sphinx
2006-Apr-09, 05:47 PM
Omicron, that was going to be my counter arguement. In a sense, it's just a mirrage (for lack of a better descriptor), is it not?

trinitree88
2006-Apr-11, 10:42 PM
How about....;) woman with shopping cart on one of those free contest sprees?:dance:

Dragon Star
2006-Apr-11, 10:44 PM
How about....;) woman with shopping cart on one of those free contest sprees?:dance:

:D :D

gwiz
2006-Apr-12, 10:58 AM
As far as spacecraft go, New Horizons had the greatest velocity relative to the Earth, at 16.2 km/s the first spacecraft to be launched directly into a solar system escape trajectory, with Helios having the greatest velocity relative to the Sun, as already mentioned.

For other manufactured objects, I believe one underground nuclear explosion in the 1950s or 1960s resulted in a large hatch over the shaft being caught in two frames of film doing 60 km/s straight up.

01101001
2006-Apr-13, 12:56 AM
For other manufactured objects, I believe one underground nuclear explosion in the 1950s or 1960s resulted in a large hatch over the shaft being caught in two frames of film doing 60 km/s straight up.
Maybe. 67 km/sec was one calculation. It appears to have been caught on just one frame of film, so its speed must be estimated. Another estimate is just 1.4 km/sec.

Manhole Covers in Space -- and Online (http://www.strangehorizons.com/2002/20021021/manhole.shtml) is a pretty good survey article about what is known of the interstellar manhole cover.

dvb
2006-Apr-14, 09:26 AM
Come now. Most people know that the space shuttle Columbia was the fastest man made object.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b224/Malarkey123/cnn2.jpg
:whistle:

david_phil
2006-Apr-14, 11:33 AM
What about the atoms in the old atomic accerator when they hit each other?

antoniseb
2006-Apr-14, 12:28 PM
What about the atoms in the old atomic accerator when they hit each other?

That was my first thought (well, I was actually thinking of electrons, not atoms). But then I figured that the person posing the question was really thinking about large extended physical objects such as space probes and man hole covers, but not counting pellets from hypervelocity cannons, or electrons accelerated up to almost the speed of light.

There's a lot of potential frames of reference that 'fastest' can be measured in. The simplest for this purpose was mentioned above: the fastest velocity for a probe as it leaves low Earth orbit.

Dragon Star
2006-Apr-14, 08:45 PM
Come now. Most people know that the space shuttle Columbia was the fastest man made object.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b224/Malarkey123/cnn2.jpg
:whistle:


http://www.illuminati-r-us.com/Forums/images/smiles/glp-1rof1.gif

Omicron Persei 8
2006-Apr-14, 09:17 PM
How about....;) woman with shopping cart on one of those free contest sprees?:dance:

If you can harness the awesome power of the woman shopper you'll be next in line for a Nobel.

Van Rijn
2006-Apr-14, 09:39 PM
The OP mentioned that particle accelerators (and presumably accelerated particles) didn't count. But if we did count particles with a rest mass, I'd say that induced neutrinos would be the fastest "man made" things around.

Eroica
2006-Apr-23, 11:07 AM
What is the fastest a man made object has gone...im loking for the answer related to high speeds in outer space..maybe one of the voyager spacecraft, or some other one. Things like particle accelerators dont count.
Despite all the helpful suggestions, it seems that the correct answer to this specific query is the one alainprice gave in the thread's very first response.

The Galileo probe fell into Jupiter's atmosphere at a speed of 47 km/sec, or 0.015% of the speed of light.

Elyk
2006-Apr-25, 04:02 PM
A clay disc or something like that was once shot at roughly 80 miles a second.

wtf? That's incredible...where'd you hear about that?

tommy_8_ball
2006-Apr-27, 12:28 AM
I thought it was the shuttle during re-entry. Mach 7, I believe.

cjl
2006-Apr-27, 12:48 AM
no, it is not, and at the beginning of reentry, it is actually travelling about mach 20.

Now, that is among the faster things ever in the atmosphere that were man made (though slower than the apollo capsules), but nowhere close to the fastest ever.

Andrew D
2010-Jan-03, 03:28 PM
For other manufactured objects, I believe one underground nuclear explosion in the 1950s or 1960s resulted in a large hatch over the shaft being caught in two frames of film doing 60 km/s straight up.

Using this principle, Carl Sagan proposed a design in the Cosmos series that could reach a segnificant fraction of the speed of light using modern technology. The craft would leave the atmosphere using conventional means and then successive nuclear detonations to accelerate to cruising speed. However, testing would be illegal because of the Partial Test Ban Treaty of 1963.

Jens
2010-Jan-05, 08:51 AM
It would also be somewhat harsh on the astronauts.

By the way, thread necromancy alert!