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View Full Version : New Spacecraft Will Search for Lunar Ice



Fraser
2006-Apr-11, 01:00 AM
SUMMARY: NASA announced a new spacecraft today that will search for ice at the Moon's southern pole: the Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS). The spacecraft will launch as a secondary payload with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in 2008. As it approaches the Moon, LCROSS will split into two spacecraft. The first will smash into the Moon's south pole, and the second will fly through the resulting plume, analyzing it for traces of water. This mission will be developed on a shoestring; NASA has allocated a total of $80 million for its development.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/ice_south_pole.html)
What do you think about this story? post your comments below.

antoniseb
2006-Apr-11, 12:30 PM
There are those that describe this as a boondoggle, and a waste of money that could have been spent elsewhere. Personally, I think that it is a lot cheaper than a mission with a lander and a deep drill, and it will tell us whether our idea of putting a base at one of the poles makes sense, based on available water.

We have plans being developed, and need that data to make decisions very soon.

zephyr46
2006-Apr-12, 02:58 AM
Well, I like the smashing things up a bit bit.

It sure would be clever to put a core sampling rig on the moon as far as letting the common man have a chance at checking out sedimentation layers.

I guess they would be similare to Earths?

We'll see when this thing goes of I guess :-)

zephyr46
2006-Apr-12, 03:00 AM
Actually it is quite an improvement in smashing things into the ocean and stuff.

:-)

antoniseb
2006-Apr-12, 01:29 PM
It sure would be clever to put a core sampling rig on the moon as far as letting the common man have a chance at checking out sedimentation layers. I guess they would be similare to Earths?


Hi Z, it's been a while (not counting seeing your journal).
I don't think the moon has a real sedimentation process. I would guess that the stuff at the bottom of a polar crater all got there in one event, and would look more like a tossed salad of rocks than like sedimentation layers of ice or ocean floor.

mickal555
2006-Jul-28, 12:11 PM
At the dawn on the Space Age, the first spaceship to reach the Moon crashed. Forty-seven years later, NASA plans to do it again. A ship named LCROSS is going to hit the Moon, not once but twice, in a daring search for lunar water
http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/28jul_crashlanding.htm?list906510