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View Full Version : The Destroyer of memory sticks



Glom
2006-Apr-14, 12:12 PM
My old Dell Computer has just destroyed the its second USB stick. The first time, I thought maybe the stick just broke. I got a new one, but this Dellcrap has just destroyed that. I tried plugging it into a USB port and then there was no response. The stick will now not even come to life on any other computers.

Is all lost? Is there no hope of recovering the data?

The_Radiation_Specialist
2006-Apr-14, 12:25 PM
very strange... USB sticks are the toughest things around...remember this BBC program where they drove over a thumbdrive with a bus and tried boiling it, smashing it and it still functioned (though the case was broken :D)

Doodler
2006-Apr-14, 01:37 PM
That's REAL odd. USB devices draw power through the plug to the machine. Maybe check the contact leads within the plug of the stick and make sure your machine doesn't have something lodged in the USB port that's prying them loose.

SolusLupus
2006-Apr-14, 01:40 PM
I thought this thread was talking about destroying the poster "sticks". I was kinda worried...

Eroica
2006-Apr-14, 01:53 PM
I thought this thread was talking about destroying the poster "sticks". I was kinda worried...Me too! :)

weatherc
2006-Apr-14, 03:09 PM
I thought this thread was talking about destroying the poster "sticks". I was kinda worried...I thought exactly the same thing. And considering that both posters are in England, it's not out of the realm of possibility...

weatherc
2006-Apr-14, 03:11 PM
Is all lost? Is there no hope of recovering the data?Um, not to sound like a jerk, but you do always keep backups of important information, don't you? You should NEVER depend on keeping any important data on just one drive (no matter what type it is).

Glom
2006-Apr-14, 07:59 PM
Most of the information is backed up. But I have since done some significant work on my ATC game.

Sticks
2006-Apr-14, 08:46 PM
I thought this thread was talking about destroying the poster "sticks". I was kinda worried...

What ever I did

I am sorry

Please don't destroy me

I am too Young to die :( :cry: :confused: :eek:

randb
2006-Apr-14, 08:50 PM
A data recovery program might work.

Sticks
2006-Apr-15, 05:01 AM
At the moment I am in hiding in another part of England, well away from my Newcastle residence :shifty: :sad:

jrkeller
2006-Apr-15, 07:23 AM
very strange... USB sticks are the toughest things around...remember this BBC program where they drove over a thumbdrive with a bus and tried boiling it, smashing it and it still functioned (though the case was broken :D)


Mine has been been through the washer and dryer twice. And it still works.

Sticks
2006-Apr-16, 05:24 AM
Is it safe for me to come back yet

The thread title reminds me of the time when someone on another forum threatened me with physical violence by getting he friends to do it.

When I inadvertantly shocked people when I was talking about Humphrey the cat, a moderator changed the thread title to remove the ambiguity. Since the word Sticks was capitalised how else was I but to take this personally. Could it not have been "Destroyer of memory sticks" with the sticks not capitalised.

antoniseb
2006-Apr-16, 10:47 AM
Could it not have been "Destroyer of memory sticks" with the sticks not capitalised.
Done.

Taks
2006-Apr-16, 05:19 PM
Is all lost? Is there no hope of recovering the data?depends on what was damaged. it is true that the memory stick derives its power from the USB connection itself, i.e. your computer. however, that might not be what is doing the damager directly. there could be a short on one of the data lines, for example, which would fry the I/O.

if only the power circuitry is damaged, the data should still be in there, though i would not know of any way to get it out without either swapping the flash to another, working, stick or attempting to repair the power circuitry. if the FLASH itself is damaged, you're probably out of luck. same goes for the I/O circuitry if the damage actually resides on the FLASH chips.

repairing the damage would be doable if you had a 'scope and good rework tools (precision solder station required). otherwise, maybe a local computer shop could help?

taks

PS: i'm sure you now know not to use that port again... i should point out that this is not an uncommon occurrence. a bad USB port can likewise take down your entire system, and the last time i saw this happen was with a Dell...

zebo-the-fat
2006-Apr-17, 11:01 AM
I bet zapping a memory stick in a microwave oven would wreck it!

I had one that died, when plugged in, the pc reported "unknown device", I got the same result on several other computers.

Sticks
2006-Apr-17, 04:22 PM
My father's PC, which had been built to order was wiped out when he tried to plug into the front USB port a card-reader. His machine was out of action until my brother inlaw did a "fix"

Now one whole row of USB ports at the back do not work, the ones at the front have been declared no go zone.

I managed to get from a poundland shop a USB extention cable for 1.00 so you can plug a USB device in without trying to fiddle at the back on the remaining USB rails.

Also the instruction that we have been given is that the PC must be powered down completely before plugging in or unplugging any USB device, as hot swapping could blow the USB again and wipe out the computer.

Taks
2006-Apr-17, 06:29 PM
Also the instruction that we have been given is that the PC must be powered down completely before plugging in or unplugging any USB device, as hot swapping could blow the USB again and wipe out the computer.there should be an option to "shut down" the device itself, allowing safe removal. of course, that may only be with a plug-n-play OS, i.e. Windows 2000 and Windows XP. i've removed my stick several times without problem (uh, shame on everyone for thinking bad thoughts on that comment).

taks

TheBlackCat
2006-Apr-17, 07:31 PM
there should be an option to "shut down" the device itself, allowing safe removal. of course, that may only be with a plug-n-play OS, i.e. Windows 2000 and Windows XP. i've removed my stick several times without problem (uh, shame on everyone for thinking bad thoughts on that comment).


I've killed a memory stick by removing it without ejecting it first. It sound somewhat similar to what happened to 777, computers wouldn't even recognize that it was plugged in. I always, always eject it first now.

Sticks
2006-Apr-17, 08:17 PM
I did mention the stop bit first, but "Rules are Rules" with regards to Dad's PC

After the rebuild Dad had even lost Word. As he is only on dial up, I asked my younger sister if they would download the free Word viewer, even though dad wanted it, and she demanded to know if this had been cleared with my brother inlaw (elder sister's husband), as he had stipulated I was not to install anything, even though it was dad who wanted to view his word documents. :eh:

It is my brother inlaw who has stipulated that the PC MUST BE SHUTDOWN BEFORE ADDING OR REMOVING ANY USB DEVICE (got that - do we need to repeat that etc.)

(Get the picture :rolleyes: )

Doodler
2006-Apr-17, 08:23 PM
I've hotswapped mice, game controllers, my USB cable modem and a 5 port hub without a whisper of trouble. This sounds more like a cheap-o USB system in the tower.

Donnie B.
2006-Apr-17, 08:26 PM
Properly designed USB devices can be safely hot-swapped. Anything with the USB logo on it (the thing that looks like an asymmetrical trident) should be fully USB compliant and safe to plug in at will.

Drive-type devices can suffer loss of data if unplugged before performing a software eject (aka dismount). This should still not damage the host or device, but may make the data unreadable. This situation should be fixable (but not necessarily recoverable) by reformatting.

However, any device (host interface or peripheral) can malfunction -- which means all bets are off. It's especially problematic when the fault occurs on a machine with higher-voltage supplies. If these ever get onto the +5V USB port, it's time to say sayonara.

(I'm currently studying the USB spec with the goal of adding USB support to a product. I don't have much more than average experience as a user, but I'm learning a lot about the USB standard and how it's all *supposed* to work.)