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View Full Version : What is the Definition of "Woo Woo"?



Saluki
2006-Apr-14, 04:42 PM
I have been on this site (and BA before) for quite some time, but I have still not nailed down the exact definition of "Woo Woo" as used here. Google was no help:



Definitions of woo woo on the Web:

Equal parts vodka and peppermint schnaps. Serve over ice in cocktail glass.
www.geocities.com/critter_75075/main_list.html (http://www.google.com/url?sa=X&start=0&oi=define&q=http://www.geocities.com/critter_75075/main_list.html)

Woo Woo is a variety of highball drink. One of the most popular versions contains: *1 1/4 oz. Vodka*1/2 oz. Peach schnapps*1 1/4 Cranberry Juice
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woo_Woo (http://www.google.com/url?sa=X&start=1&oi=define&q=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woo_Woo)

Based on the context, I am 99.9999% certain that we are not discussing coctails.

Now, I thought that it was someone who is strongly adherent to a theory (any theory) so much so that it becomes quasi-religious fanatacisim. I picture a guy who is a Woo Woo, for example for the Moon Hoax theory seeing a piece of evidence that he believes supports the theory, and yelling "Woo Woo, I have evidence!"

However, I appear to be wrong on this, because when I applied this term to fanatical adherents of another theory (I will not go into which theory so as to avoid controversy), I was chastised by the staff here for using ad hominem atacks, even though there was no specific person here at the site that I was atacking.

Now, I see the term brought up in several threads (the thread regarding the new Venus south pole pic for example, presumably to refer to the "there are aliens everywhere, and NASA is covering up the evidence" crowd), and at this point, it is not apparently considered by the staff to be an ad hominem atack on anyone.

I am honestly confused. Please enlighten me.

NEOWatcher
2006-Apr-14, 04:54 PM
SNIP
Now, I thought that it was someone who is strongly adherent to a theory (any theory) so much so that it becomes quasi-religious fanatacisim. I picture a guy who is a Woo Woo, for example for the Moon Hoax theory seeing a piece of evidence that he believes supports the theory, and yelling "Woo Woo, I have evidence!"

snip

I am honestly confused. Please enlighten me.
Without knowing the case you mention, I do think that you need to add to your definition.
Not only someone strongly adherent to a theory, but to a theory that has overwhelming evidence against it.

ToSeek
2006-Apr-14, 05:18 PM
I think NEOWatcher basically has it: someone who clings to a notion, particularly one involving aliens or space travel, apparently mostly because it's contrary to the "powers-that-be" mainstream thinking and despite the evidence against it.

Saluki
2006-Apr-14, 06:02 PM
So, it is not considered an ad hom atack when properly applied?

ToSeek
2006-Apr-14, 06:30 PM
My inclination would be to say that if you use it in a very generic sense to refer to people with a particular belief system, it's barely acceptable ("The woo-woos who believe that there's a Planet X in the inner solar system"). If you use it to refer to any specifically identifiable people, then it's not ("This woo-woo's website is totally bizarre"). But I don't think the term adds much to any conversation.

Saluki
2006-Apr-14, 07:15 PM
Ok. I will avoid it completely. It was just confusing me to see it used so frequently in the exact same way that I used it, only for a different group of people, without comment, while the very first time I used the term (to the best of my recollection), I got in trouble.

ToSeek
2006-Apr-14, 07:31 PM
We're not always as consistent as we should be. Or else we just don't notice stuff.

Lord Jubjub
2006-Apr-15, 02:58 AM
I always associated woo-woo as a sound that goes along with the forefinger twirling about the ear--e.g. someone who needs a visit from the men in white coats.

Kaptain K
2006-Apr-15, 07:01 AM
Another aspect of "Woo-woos" (at least those that inhabit GLP) is that, when confronted with real, hard evidence against their beliefs will accuse you of being a "paid government disinfo agent".

I wish!

Lance
2006-Apr-15, 02:19 PM
Woo Woo is relative.

If you were on GLP, for example, and posted that people here on BAUT are Woo Woos, you would be applauded and welcomed as one of their own.

Ken G
2006-Apr-15, 02:36 PM
My definition of a woo-woo is someone who cares more about being "in the know", than simply being in the know.

Arneb
2006-Apr-15, 07:47 PM
Short of providing a definition, this site (http://www.watchingyou.com/woowoo.html) describes how woo-woos work, or rather, play the game of intellectual Rattenfänger.

If used on a person in a debate I would consider the term ad hom. However, I find the term acceptable to describe people who use the kind of disingenious methods of debate described on the site. After all, one of our moderators sports the link and the term in his sig.

George
2006-Apr-16, 01:39 AM
Short of providing a definition, this site (http://www.watchingyou.com/woowoo.html) describes how woo-woos work, or rather, play the game of intellectual Rattenfänger.
:clap: Great link. :)

Are there woo-woo levels of alert, as in asteroids and huricanes?

"Woo-woo" is not to be confused wth "wooh-wooh" as this is the sound from the "little train that could". [Some ideas that seem weak can make it to the top. :) ]

Cookie
2006-Apr-17, 04:28 AM
I dunno if this will help, but here's a Visual Aid:

http://pages.sbcglobal.net/joethedude/Smiley_Woo_Woo.gif

Arneb
2006-Apr-17, 02:07 PM
That smiley has it all:
They run around unpredictably, trying to never present any actual target in the argument; they hand-waive; they make this funny sound like


However, that this geometry is not some new form of internal geological control -- modulated by the planetary Hyperdimensional Physics (http://www.enterprisemission.com/hyper1.html) we’ve found operating on other planets – also seems clear; neither “ring” lies anywhere near the infamous 19.5-degree “upwelling latitude” controlled by internal “tetrahedral” forces we see operating on other planets and their satellites. Yet, the placement of both “ring features,” 120 degrees apart, is obviously conveying the same “tetrahedral message” left behind in other artificial ruins we’ve explored across the solar system …
Wooooooo, wooooooooo

You guess, of course, who wrote this... (http://www.enterprisemission.com/moon2.htm)

five_distinct
2006-Apr-17, 03:23 PM
Oh they're the people who use INAPPROPRIATE bold, "CAPS LOCK", and quotations to "make" everything "seem" SUSPICIOUS.

Kaptain K
2006-Apr-17, 06:33 PM
That smiley has it all:
They run around unpredictably, trying to never present any actual target in the argument; they hand-waive; they make this funny sound like


Wooooooo, wooooooooo

You guess, of course, who wrote this... (http://www.enterprisemission.com/moon2.htm)
I didn't have to guess. It was obvious to anyone who has followed the ravings of Hoaxland.

farmerjumperdon
2006-Apr-17, 07:06 PM
Definitions of woo woo on the Web:

Equal parts vodka and peppermint schnaps. Serve over ice in cocktail glass.
www.geocities.com/critter_75075/main_list.html

Woo Woo is a variety of highball drink. One of the most popular versions contains: *1 1/4 oz. Vodka*1/2 oz. Peach schnapps*1 1/4 Cranberry Juice
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woo_Woo

A Cosmopolitan with a touch of schnapps. I wonder how that got named woo-woo?

Bob
2006-Apr-17, 07:34 PM
Not to be confused with the Russian Yoo-Hoo: similar to a White Russian (vodka, kahlua, and cream) but with Yoo-Hoo chocolate drink substituted for the cream.

farmerjumperdon
2006-Apr-17, 07:38 PM
We invented one similar to that down at Mardi Gras one year. Named it the White Whale. White Russian with an additional half shot each of brandy and Creme de menthe and/or Creme de Cocoa. We were being very flexible that week.

five_distinct
2006-Apr-17, 08:34 PM
I didn't have to guess. It was obvious to anyone who has followed the ravings of Hoaxland.

That guy has too much time on his hands.

Edit: Lollerz @ this


" ... higher-level, hyperdimensional rotation (beyond this dimension), creating resonant rotational (torquing) forces projected into this dimension via the intervening medium of the aether ... thus, encouraging a "lower-level" (3-D) synchronization of the inertial rotational/orbit relationships of both objects, Earth and Venus ... and their satellites.

These HD rotational effects were first confirmed via the Enterprise's on-going "accutron measurement tests," being conducted currently at Coral Castle, in southern Florida. Most notably, these predicted "rotational effects" were strikingly apparent as changes in the frequency (constrained rotation) of the tuning fork in an Accutron watch -- recorded during the recent (2004) Summer Transit of Venus across the face of the Sun (see data, below).


http://www.enterprisemission.com/images/Accutron-Venus%20Third%20Contact.jpg


Well I'm sold, this graph clearly demonstrates whatever the hell he was going on about...

TheBlackCat
2006-Apr-18, 01:08 AM
Here is a good definition, as well as the reason why it is not acceptable to many people: Woo-woo (http://www.skepticwiki.org/wiki/index.php/Woo)

Maksutov
2006-Apr-18, 01:47 AM
The no space, non-hyphenated version appears to have the blessing of a higher authority (http://www.badastronomy.com/bad/misc/jupiter_galileo.html), as implied by its usage. See the seventh paragraph on that page.

Seventh...hmmm, sounds pretty significant, must be some hidden meaning in there somewhere. Where'd I put that numerology book?

http://www.cosgan.de/images/midi/verschiedene/f045.gif

Laguna
2006-Apr-18, 07:05 AM
A woo woo is someone spreading THE TRUTHTM
As is easily seen, THE TRUTHTM cannot be seen for free.
You have to drop a significant amount of money into the "Fidji Vacation Fund" to get closer to THE TRUTHTM

Reticuli
2006-Apr-19, 03:16 AM
Hi,
If the term "Woo Woo" is allowed, the opposite could be the "Pooh Poohs", those that dismiss ideas altogether???
Me is just asking.... I will not use either one, of course...
Me

Saluki
2006-Apr-19, 01:23 PM
So, are the various people above who are using the term to refer to Kenneth Hoagland, along with those referring to him as "Hoaxland" currently in violation of the Terms of Service of this site, or is there special dispensation when referring to him?

Note that I in no way support Mr. Hoagland or imply that there is any shread of credibility to anything that comes out of his mouth or keyboard. I am simply trying to nail down the rules.

Gillianren
2006-Apr-19, 06:36 PM
Pretty much, yes. My friend points out that as near as she can work out, it essentially means someone who's ATM but not very good at it.

ToSeek
2006-Apr-19, 07:45 PM
So, are the various people above who are using the term to refer to Kenneth Hoagland, along with those referring to him as "Hoaxland" currently in violation of the Terms of Service of this site, or is there special dispensation when referring to him?

Note that I in no way support Mr. Hoagland or imply that there is any shread of credibility to anything that comes out of his mouth or keyboard. I am simply trying to nail down the rules.

Richard Hoagland is a public figure (in the legal terminology according to libel laws) and in one of our areas of focus, so basically he is a special case. However, a post that did nothing but call him names would still be inappropriate - if you can call him names and explain why you're doing so, then that would tend to pass.

Saluki
2006-Apr-19, 07:57 PM
I honestly don't know where Kenneth came from. I have heard Richard several times on CTCAM, and knew his name well. I think it might have been because I was talking to a guy named Ken on the phone while I was typing the post.

Incidentally, a local radio talk show was talking about Hoagland's take on Iaptus recently. Apparently, the hosts were simply web surfing and found the Enterprise mission site. The whole show, they talked about Hoagland's pronouncements as if they were gospel truth, and did not reference any other information that would contradict him. I was in my car, and without a cell phone. I was fuming by the time I got to a phone.

George
2006-Apr-19, 08:32 PM
What would woophobia mean? A fear of woo-woos disturbing your life, I suppose; but could it mean a fear you look woo-wooish?

Saluki
2006-Apr-19, 08:52 PM
What would woophobia mean? A fear of woo-woos disturbing your life, I suppose; but could it mean a fear you look woo-wooish?

If applied as loosely as the modern PC crowd does, it could mean anyone who has anything to say that is not completely glowingly positive with respect to woo-woos.

George
2006-Apr-19, 10:38 PM
If applied as loosely as the modern PC crowd does, it could mean anyone who has anything to say that is not completely glowingly positive with respect to woo-woos. That is likely. I was hoping to differentiate woophobia from just personal timidity when a new idea is not presented, or presented with apprehension.

HenrikOlsen
2006-Apr-23, 05:55 AM
I always thought it was an onomatopoeicon.

One characteristic of many woo-woo's not mentioned much in this thread is a tendency towards alarmism.
I always think of the word as the sound they make when they've heard of a new doomsday scenario, such as "the Galileo craft will make Jupiter explode and fry the earth" and are running around in little circles waving their hands in the air.

Halcyon Dayz
2006-Apr-23, 06:20 AM
"When in danger or in doubt,
Run in circles,
scream and shout."

Lance
2006-Apr-23, 02:15 PM
"When in danger or in doubt,
Run in circles,
scream and shout."
ROFL

If a bear were chasing you, or you thought there was, this would probably work.

Gillianren
2006-Apr-23, 07:52 PM
At the very least, you'd probably confuse the bear before it ate you.