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Damburger
2006-Apr-16, 04:13 AM
For those that don't know, Sea Dragon was a proposal for a very large (650t to LEO) rocket that would be launched in the open sea rather than from a launchpad.

Its occured to me there might be a problem with this. When the engines of this thing ignite they are going to be pushing a hell of a lot of mass into the water, as rockets do, creating a pressure wave. Would this wave be any threat to the rest of the rocket (most of which would still be in the water when the thing is launched)?

antoniseb
2006-Apr-16, 11:38 AM
Sea Dragon was going to be a big rocket, but you are seriously underestimating the energy required to create a dangerous tsunami.

Damburger
2006-Apr-16, 12:51 PM
Sea Dragon was going to be a big rocket, but you are seriously underestimating the energy required to create a dangerous tsunami.

Thats not what I meant.

I mean wouldn't large amounts of force be transmitted through the water to the body of the rocket from the nozzle.

antoniseb
2006-Apr-16, 12:55 PM
Thats not what I meant.

I mean wouldn't large amounts of force be transmitted through the water to the body of the rocket from the nozzle.
I see now, thanks. How would this be different from any other sea launch rocket? The scale is different, but the dynamics should be the same.

publiusr
2006-May-04, 10:38 PM
Look here:

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=1544&posts=7

mugaliens
2006-May-05, 10:24 PM
Literally, billions and even trillions of times as much energy is required to generate tsunamis than is required to move even ten times as much as the largest rocket launch to date.

Even a two-foot wave across a mile of shoreline carries more energy than the most massive launch to date.

Ara Pacis
2006-May-06, 05:52 PM
Literally, billions and even trillions of times as much energy is required to generate tsunamis than is required to move even ten times as much as the largest rocket launch to date.

Even a two-foot wave across a mile of shoreline carries more energy than the most massive launch to date.

That's not what he was asking.

Fraser
2006-May-07, 05:13 AM
Here's a link on the Sea Dragon. Very interesting concept.
http://www.astronautix.com/lvs/searagon.htm

The article says that the overall concept was proven with prior test vehicles, the Sea Bee and the Sea Horse.