PDA

View Full Version : IQ Test!



The_Radiation_Specialist
2006-Apr-17, 02:12 AM
Hey all!

This (http://www.intelligencetest.com) is a fun IQ test which takes less than 10 minutes . I got 122 in my first try :o.

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Apr-17, 03:33 AM
135. Fun test, but I wouldn't put too much credence in it.

Cookie
2006-Apr-17, 04:54 AM
Aparently, the test is timed, as I was spending too much time on one of the questions when a new page automatically loaded...

My score was 101, but I didn't get to finish it in time, because I assumed there was no time limit...
=b

cjl
2006-Apr-17, 05:46 AM
133 here

I wouldn't put much weight on it though.

clop
2006-Apr-17, 08:13 AM
132 here.

Looks like BAUT attracts a certain type of person.

clop

filrabat
2007-Jan-23, 08:03 PM
I speak as someone recently tested by professionals, not to mentioin standardized tests.

This linked test, I got 99 on...which is WELL below my scores over the years ever since I was 14. I echo Cookie's problem where my score was concerned - I assumed there was no limit, no doubt because I didn't read the instructions thoroughly enough.

Anyway, I got the following "full scale" (overall) scores on PROFESSIONALLY administered tests:

120 on the Wechler Test of Adult Reading
117 on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale

Furthermore, I got 1120 on my GRE (around the 90th percentile), 22 on my ACT, and some test administered the summer before my 9th grade year, I got the equivalent of the low 120s IQ. So you can say my middle estimated IQ is 120 +/- 3 points. Personally, I'd say about the high 110s (i.e., ranges from the 87th to 91st percentiles), given these were professionally administered by a cognitive psychologist and a neuropsychologist.

The selected "subtests" are a lot more revealing about one's cognitive strengths and weakenesses. My highest scores were in general information (i.e. Where is Armeina? etc.) and Letter-Number sequencing. I also did well on pre-algebra arithmetic and reading comprehension and vocablulary. Remembering visual patterns was also superior, as measured by a picture of lines I was given a few minutes to study (VERY important distinction, as you can discern from the next paragraph).

However, my big glaring weakness was in "Processing Speed" (i.e., how fast my mind works). This is especially evident when it comes to searching for symbols in a page without any opportunity to actually study the page (hence the "VERY important distinction).

Bottom Line: My professionally administered verbal IQ is 124 (95th percentile) while my performance IQ was only 109 (73rd percentile). This is a pretty huge gap between the two basic subtypes.

Again, if you want something substantive, get tested by a neuropsychologist for ten hours like I did.

One Skunk Todd
2007-Jan-23, 08:52 PM
I got 152 but I've always tested well on rotating shapes/spatial orientation stuff. Can't do long division without a calculator though.

jrkeller
2007-Jan-23, 09:59 PM
I got 152 but I've always tested well on rotating shapes/spatial orientation stuff. Can't do long division without a calculator though.

While I didn't get quite as high as you, 135, I did very well on the spatial stuff too. I got a perfect score on the verbal part which is always worst subject. I got close to the score I usually get

kmarinas86
2007-Jan-23, 11:13 PM
I got all 30 questions right. But look at the inane results I got:


Strengths and weaknesses

Your highest score was in Verbal

Exceptional intelligence does not guarantee results -- to achieve excellence you must fully understand your strengths and learn to maximize your efforts. Knowing your greatest intellectual strength may give you insight into how you can improve your learning process, work better with others, or become more self aware of your abilities. According to this test your verbal skills are the most developed of all your intellectual capabilities - your capability to use language effectively and to communicate well is your biggest strength.



Your lowest score was in Verbal

Weaknesses are the roadblocks we face when trying to achieve our goals. Awareness of your weaknesses allows you to predict problems and find solutions ahead of time, thereby alleviating future headaches. According to this test your verbal skills are the most underdeveloped of all your intellectual capabilities - your capability to use language effectively and to communicate well is your biggest weakness

136 here - Age 20

Or 158 - according to Cattell

http://www.intelligencetest.com/convert.htm

ToSeek
2007-Jan-23, 11:26 PM
129 here. Thought I got them all right, but I was obviously wrong.

Delvo
2007-Jan-24, 01:31 AM
if you want something substantive, get tested by a neuropsychologist for ten hours like I did.Why did you do that?

filrabat
2007-Jan-24, 06:08 PM
Why did you do that?

Last summer, I went to a psychologist for ADD testing. He noticed a huge gap between my verbal and performance IQs but defered the diagnosis. So he reccommended I see a neuropsychologist for more thorough testing. As it turns out, my symptoms are not suspicious for ADD, BUT they are susupicous for something called Executive Dysfunction Syndrome ("Executive Functions" are basically the Brain's CEO - planning, organization, word retrieval, memory/recall imposing order in chaotic situations, processing novel information (new-to-my-experience), handling novel and spontaneous situations. It’s only recently (past few years) been possible to semi-definitely diagnose the condition because conventional testing has a hard time detecting the syndrome - especially since it shows up only in common, everyday situations (i.e., outside a formal diagnosis environment).

Of those, by far the worst is short-term memory. When it comes to novel, multi-step tasks, old (about 30 seconds old or older) information interferes with absorbing/processing newer information (called "proactive interference). To an extent, I also have "retroactive intereference". I also deal with I and "set shifting" (i.e. incorporating novel rules into a routine situation). It's not impossible for me to deal with the problem, it's just that I have "slow processing speed" in this regard. Thankfully, these problems are much reduced when it comes to formal, structured topics and sitautions.

Speech testing also revealed I had moderate aphasia as well (speech-cognitive disorder)

All the above means that I have problems with spontaneous, unstructured speech - plus problems dealing with novel situations, especially for complex tasks. However, I DO benefit from repeated expousure/ repetition. Fortunately, these are covered by the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Rehabilitation Acts, so I will get some degree of legal protection (I just got approved for help last month, though).

filrabat
2007-Jan-24, 06:10 PM
But...this thread should be about IQ tests, not cognitive difficulties in general. I'm not trying to dodge the topic because this is nothing I should be ashamed of. It's just that I don't want to hijack this thread. Besides, I've told you all the relevant information already.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jan-24, 06:41 PM
I've taken "real" IQ tests 3 times. They have always been timed. What would be the point in not timing? It seems to me that most of the problems and many of the questions could be answered correctly by just about any adult, if they are given enough time.

The point of the testing isn't how a person assimilates and uses information, it is how WELL they do so. Part of how well is how fast.

I consider IQ tests for humans as kind of a combination of processing power and software quality for computers. The quality and speed are both critical. Getting the right answer is important. Getting it today is equally important.

crosscountry
2007-Jan-24, 09:04 PM
129 here. Thought I got them all right, but I was obviously wrong.

it scored me right were I've been scored in the past. I only missed one and guessed on anther


Short tests like that only give you a rough idea of where you are. But mine agrees with the other short testes I've been given and with the one I took as a child.

It wasn't that anyone wanted their IQ tested, that is boring. A neighbor in the University housing where my brother and I lived with our mom was earning his psychsomethingorother degree and gave free tests. Ever kid on the block had it done.

Gillianren
2007-Jan-24, 09:22 PM
It wasn't that anyone wanted their IQ tested, that is boring. A neighbor in the University housing where my brother and I lived with our mom was earning his psychsomethingorother degree and gave free tests. Ever kid on the block had it done.

I want my IQ properly tested. It was when I was a small child--so I could get into gifted classes--but my mother not only won't tell me what my score was, but she now refuses to acknowledge that I was tested at all. (She told me when I was young that it was higher than my sister's, though.)

Chunky
2007-Jan-24, 09:58 PM
i got 110 :(

crosscountry
2007-Jan-24, 11:23 PM
I want my IQ properly tested. It was when I was a small child--so I could get into gifted classes--but my mother not only won't tell me what my score was, but she now refuses to acknowledge that I was tested at all. (She told me when I was young that it was higher than my sister's, though.)


you'll have to pay for it.

mike alexander
2007-Jan-24, 11:50 PM
Take our free PhD certified IQ test...

But was it a smart PhD or a dumb PhD?


Your free results include 25 pages of analysis packed with graphs, information, statistics, advice, and career tips!

All that from 50 questions?

I'm tempted to try it and put in all the wrong answers just to see what the career tips are for someone with an IQ of zero. Paving block, perhaps?

crosscountry
2007-Jan-24, 11:58 PM
you won´t get a 0... ask me how I know.

Delvo
2007-Jan-25, 01:02 AM
i got 110 :(A negative reaction to an above-average score... this kind of thing is exactly why I will not have my IQ tested or do anything else that would feel like competition/comparison or calling attention to it or trying to get other people's reactions to it. That kind of stuff seems to only have negative effects on a person's life and happiness, like there's pressure on anyone above average to constantly prove (s)he's the "best" in the world and anything "less" is a let-down, a failure, but even succes at proving it only seems to lead to the pressure to keep proving it again and again later while defining the whole person by that one trait as if (s)he has no other value and is obligated to live his/her life the way people expect according to pidgeon-hole stereotypes of what smart people are supposed to do.

So it essentially turns life itself into a competition, and it's a competition you can never win because even a win is just another kind of loss. I've thought of starting a thread around here that would have been titled something like "What good has your intelligence ever done you?" to see whether others of higher-than-average intelligence (which a science forum is likely to be populated by) tend to have this kind of love-hate relationship with it... and whether, on average, people think they're better off with it or without it.

Gillianren
2007-Jan-25, 02:49 AM
you'll have to pay for it.

Yeah, I know. Maybe I can get my therapist to suggest someone who'll do it for my insurance.

crosscountry
2007-Jan-25, 12:26 PM
A negative reaction to an above-average score... this kind of thing is exactly why I will not have my IQ tested or do anything else that would feel like competition/comparison or calling attention to it or trying to get other people's reactions to it. That kind of stuff seems to only have negative effects on a person's life and happiness, like there's pressure on anyone above average to constantly prove (s)he's the "best" in the world and anything "less" is a let-down, a failure, but even succes at proving it only seems to lead to the pressure to keep proving it again and again later while defining the whole person by that one trait as if (s)he has no other value and is obligated to live his/her life the way people expect according to pidgeon-hole stereotypes of what smart people are supposed to do.

So it essentially turns life itself into a competition, and it's a competition you can never win because even a win is just another kind of loss. I've thought of starting a thread around here that would have been titled something like "What good has your intelligence ever done you?" to see whether others of higher-than-average intelligence (which a science forum is likely to be populated by) tend to have this kind of love-hate relationship with it... and whether, on average, people think they're better off with it or without it.


good points. Sometimes I wish I could just live without thinking things through. I question myself more than actually act. Some people live life without the full consciousness of their actions. Those people seem to be happier and have more emotions. I'm definitly not emotional and almost never get caught up in the moment.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jan-25, 12:51 PM
A neighbor in the University housing where my brother and I lived with our mom was earning his psychsomethingorother degree and gave free tests. Ever kid on the block had it done.

I feel gyped. All we got in my neighborhood were free haircuts.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jan-25, 12:53 PM
But was it a smart PhD or a dumb PhD?



All that from 50 questions?

I'm tempted to try it and put in all the wrong answers just to see what the career tips are for someone with an IQ of zero. Paving block, perhaps?

One of my old bosses was into all those schlocky evaluations, the kind you used to see in Psychology today. The career suggestion from one of them was:

Heavy equipment operator.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jan-25, 12:55 PM
I've thought of starting a thread around here that would have been titled something like "What good has your intelligence ever done you?" to see whether others of higher-than-average intelligence (which a science forum is likely to be populated by) tend to have this kind of love-hate relationship with it... and whether, on average, people think they're better off with it or without it.

I hear you there. Sometimes I feel like I'm supposed to apology for being smart - usually to someone from the I-don't-need-no-stinking-degree crowd.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jan-25, 12:56 PM
Yeah, I know. Maybe I can get my therapist to suggest someone who'll do it for my insurance.

Your insurance company would probably come out pretty average.

MrClean
2007-Jan-25, 01:44 PM
Whyzit always when you start taking one of these thing that you get partway through and someone comes in and needs to show you something pressingly important for about 20 minutes ONLY to find out that they wanted to tell you about this rather excellent cinnamin bun that they had last night and it has nothing to do with work after all? Stupid Boss. 19 questions taken, 19 correct and then flatline.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jan-25, 01:58 PM
Bosses and co-workers have no sense of timing.

I'm trying to make a chess move, and they keep bothering me. All I ask for is a few uniterupted minutes, then I can get busy again. They don't get that if they keep bothering me with work "stuff" it could take all day to make one stinking move.

crosscountry
2007-Jan-25, 03:09 PM
darn the way work always seem to get in the way of life

SeanF
2007-Jan-25, 03:32 PM
Question:


3. Choose the conclusion that validly follows from the argument below.

All kittens are playful
Some pets are kittens
Therefore

1. All kittens are pets
2. Some kittens are pets
3. All pets are playful
4. Some pets are playful
5. I don't know
Aren't there two possible correct answers to this one?

(I guess three if you consider that "I don't know" could be the correct answer! ;) )

crosscountry
2007-Jan-25, 03:38 PM
besides 4, number 2 looks good, but the question asks to choose the conclusion that validly follows


maybe the test writer has something in mind a->b b->c
a->c

not c maybe ->b

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jan-25, 06:03 PM
Only number 4 is known to be true based on the assumptions given.

The other 3 are all possible, but can't be known for certain to be true or false without additional information.

#5 is a strange option for that kind of question. Maybe they meant it to be something like No conclusions possible.

timeless
2007-Jan-25, 06:47 PM
at 20, my score was 120. I knew it was timed, but I didn't realize the importance of this factor in the test, since I went back and checked each answer until the time ran out. A stupid mistake, and as such I guess my score was deserved.

Jeff Root
2007-Jan-25, 06:59 PM
Only number 4 is known to be true based on the assumptions given.
Number 2 is equally true, based just on the second premise:
If some pets are kittens, then some kittens are pets.
However, we all somehow just know that number 4 is the
intended correct answer.



#5 is a strange option for that kind of question.
I didn't take the test, but I did read the instructions and sample
questions. It appears that the option "I don't know" is provided
for all the questions. That seems very reasonable to me. Instead
of losing points for giving an incorrect answer or no answer, or
getting points for a lucky guess, you probably get zero points
for saying that you don't know.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

HenrikOlsen
2007-Jan-25, 07:15 PM
Actually #2 is true as well, "Some pets are kittens" is equivalent to "there exists at least one pet which is a kitten", from which it follows that "there exists at least one kitten which is a pet".

#4 is the only one that is both true and requires both axioms.

They mean #5 as: I have no idea how to solve this.

BTW I got 137.
It helps a lot

SeanF
2007-Jan-25, 07:19 PM
Number 2 is equally true, based just on the second premise:
If some pets are kittens, then some kittens are pets.
Yes, that was my thought, too. :)

mike alexander
2007-Jan-25, 07:22 PM
I had my kitten spayed yesterday. It was definitely not playful.

Thank God I don't have to take those things anymore.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jan-25, 08:49 PM
Actually #2 is true as well, "Some pets are kittens" is equivalent to "there exists at least one pet which is a kitten", from which it follows that "there exists at least one kitten which is a pet".

#4 is the only one that is both true and requires both axioms.

They mean #5 as: I have no idea how to solve this.

BTW I got 137.
It helps a lot

See, my interpretation of "Some" in this case is not as open ended. To me saying some excludes the possibility of all. Some to me means part of the whole, but not all.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jan-25, 08:54 PM
Yes, that was my thought, too. :)

But the question wasn't: Which statements are true, or even which statements are possibly true.

It was: Choose the conclusion that validly follows from the arguement.

To make the example extreme, it is true that planets travel in eliptical orbits, but that fact hardly follows from the arguement given.

SeanF
2007-Jan-25, 10:00 PM
See, my interpretation of "Some" in this case is not as open ended. To me saying some excludes the possibility of all. Some to me means part of the whole, but not all.
Yes, but if take "some" to mean "some, but not all," then we can't conclude that number 4 is correct, either. Which would mean the only correct answer is 5.


But the question wasn't: Which statements are true, or even which statements are possibly true.

It was: Choose the conclusion that validly follows from the arguement.

To make the example extreme, it is true that planets travel in eliptical orbits, but that fact hardly follows from the arguement given.
"Some kittens are pets" validly follows from the argument that "some pets are kittens."

MrClean
2007-Jan-26, 12:08 AM
Well if you are going to argue the meaning of Some, I want to bring up the Glaring Falsity in the first statement. All Kittens are NOT playful. Fact is it's hard to get a dead one to do ANYTHING!!

I'm going to burn in Hell, aren't I?

Delvo
2007-Jan-26, 01:20 AM
This is the kind of problem I keep running into with multiple-choice tests. I end up seeing multiple different ways to interpret the question and/or its optional answers, so I'm essentially being tested not on my understanding of the subject, but on my ability to guess which mode the test writer was thinking in. In a way, it could be worse to see only one interpretation you know of... then you could get the answer "wrong" due to interpretation despite knowing the subject perfectly well, never now what really happened, and think your comprehension of the subject had been wrong when it wasn't! Sometimes I end up testing the test, consciously catching the various flaws and errors with how it's written, coming up with lists of as many reasons as possible why each of the choices on some questions could be considered the right one in different ways.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jan-26, 12:51 PM
Well if you are going to argue the meaning of Some, I want to bring up the Glaring Falsity in the first statement. All Kittens are NOT playful. Fact is it's hard to get a dead one to do ANYTHING!!

I'm going to burn in Hell, aren't I?

Maybe. But if the PETA people find this thread, they will definitely put a hex on you.

Disinfo Agent
2007-Jan-26, 11:48 PM
"Some kittens are pets" validly follows from the argument that "some pets are kittens."I guess the keyword is "argument". If you only use one premise, is it an argument?...