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Fraser
2006-Apr-19, 07:08 PM
SUMMARY: NASA scientists have created a new computer simulation that shows what happens when two black holes come together. Einstein predicted that this cataclysmic event should send out a torrent of gravitational waves, rippling the space around them. The simulation was done on the the Columbia supercomputer, which is the 4th fastest computer in the world. The mathematics involved in these simulations are so complex, and so bizarre, that previous attempts have ended with little more than crashed computers.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/nasa_blackhole_sim.html)
What do you think about this story? post your comments below.

Gerald Lukaniuk
2006-Apr-20, 01:29 AM
SUMMARY: NASA scientists have created a new computer simulation that shows what happens when two black holes come together. Einstein predicted that this cataclysmic event should send out a torrent of gravitational waves, rippling the space around them. The simulation was done on the the Columbia supercomputer, which is the 4th fastest computer in the world. The mathematics involved in these simulations are so complex, and so bizarre, that previous attempts have ended with little more than crashed computers.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/nasa_blackhole_sim.html)
What do you think about this story? post your comments below.
"Einstein predicted that this cataclysmic event"
As I recall Einstein was always uncomfortable about the possibility of singularities arising from his equations. It was Schwarzschilde who postulated black holes.

Titana
2006-Apr-20, 05:49 AM
I was reading a very interesting article on SPACE.com about two supermassive black holes that have been found spiraling toward a merger.


HERE (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/060406_blackhole_merge.html)


Titana

GOURDHEAD
2006-Apr-20, 01:19 PM
From the linked article:
According to Einstein's math, when two massive black holes merge, all of space jiggles like a bowl of Jell-O as gravitational waves race out from the collision at light speed.How can we possibly detect space jiggling like a bowl of Jell-O?

As a pair of black holes approach each other, are the trajectories of their approach able to influence the result? Elliptical orbits of various eccentricities, parabolic passing trajectories, and hyperbolic passing trajectories would each seem to lead to widely varying results. Is it likely that encounters exist that would cause the mutual gravitational attraction aided and abetted by magnetic and electric fields generated by the encounter including the relative velocities of each of the black holes would rip each of them apart? Could synchronicities associated with orbital periods and whatever passes for viscosity inside a black hole provide a means for the potential energy of a black hole to be converted to kinetic energy such that each is repelled by the other by transfers of rotational angular momentum to orbital angular momentum (similar to how the moon is repelled from the Earth ever so slightly by similar transfers of angular momentum from tidal action)?

How useful can simulations of non-rotating black holes be anyway? How likely is it that we can construct simulations using rotating, charged, black
holes under the conditions cited above?

astro-orange
2006-Apr-20, 01:53 PM
The Pentagon uses the Pacific Blue supercomputer to simulate nuclear explosions (so the Greenpeace folks donīt get angry :-)). Which shows us that seemingly primitive and violent processes are mathematically exceedingly sophisticated. The Goddard researchers will go at this step by step (regarding trajectories, and spinning, and charged black holes).
This is one of the good things about physics: itīs mighty strong, but still brilliant!