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Byrd
2003-Mar-20, 04:59 PM
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Astronomers who flipped their telescopes to see a gamma ray burst "live" said on Wednesday they witnessed the death of a gigantic star and the birth of what looks like a black hole.

article here:
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&cid=570&ncid=753&e=5&u=/nm/20030319/sc_nm/space_gamma_dc

RafaelAustin
2003-Mar-20, 05:13 PM
I was about to post this! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

NASA press release: (http://www.nasa.gov/HP_news_03107.html)


Gamma-ray bursts shine hundreds of times brighter than a supernova, or as bright as a million trillion suns. The mysterious bursts are common, yet random and fleeting. The gamma-ray portion of a burst typically lasts from a few milliseconds to 100 seconds. An afterglow, caused by shock waves from the explosion sweeping up matter and ramming this into the region around the burst, can linger for days or weeks in lower-energy forms of light, such as X rays or visible light.

A gamma-ray burst, named GRB021004, appeared on October 4, 2002, at 8:06 a.m. EDT. Wasting no time, HETE spotted the burst, nailed down a location, and notified observers worldwide within a few seconds, while the gamma rays were still pouring in. First on the scene was the Automated Response Telescope (ART) in Wako, Japan, observing the region just 193 seconds after the burst.

Now that's a quick response!

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: RafaelAustin on 2003-03-20 12:15 ]</font>

ToSeek
2003-Mar-20, 05:51 PM
On 2003-03-20 12:13, RafaelAustin wrote:

Now that's a quick response!



Thank the Internet - there's a whole automated notification system set up now, triggered from the various NASA satellites that are usually the first to detect GRBs.

Hale_Bopp
2003-Mar-21, 03:38 AM
And soon, the Swift satellite will be up there bagging GRBs and their afterglows in X-Rray, ultraviolet and visible within a minute of detection!

http://swift.gsfc.nasa.gov/

Rob

Hale_Bopp
2003-Mar-21, 03:43 AM
Should have added something...the significance of this burst is that they saw an afterglow quickly because it disappeared in under two hours.

Many gamma ray burst have been termed "dark" since no visible afterglow can be found. Now there is evidence that afterglows were fomerly called dark might actually have very quickly fading afterglows. With the new satellites and rapid response, this idea will be put to the test in the near future.

This burst also was a middle lenght burst. GRBs tend to be either long (~10s of seconds) or short (~.1 seconds). This was a rare burst in between the two classes.

Rob

The Bad Astronomer
2003-Mar-21, 05:27 AM
On 2003-03-20 22:38, Hale_Bopp wrote:
And soon, the Swift satellite will be up there bagging GRBs and their afterglows in X-Rray, ultraviolet and visible within a minute of detection!
http://swift.gsfc.nasa.gov/


Um, or this one: swift.sonoma.edu (http://swift.sonoma.edu).

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: The Bad Astronomer on 2003-03-21 00:28 ]</font>

ToSeek
2003-Apr-04, 05:31 PM
Whew! The closest one yet (http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99993592)

ToSeek
2003-Apr-04, 05:33 PM
NASA press release (http://www.nasa.gov/home/HP_news_03126.html) on same GRB.