PDA

View Full Version : Bad Astronomy in Pikmin



darkhunter
2003-Mar-25, 09:04 PM
Pikmin is a Gamecube game...you ship crashes and you gotta get all the parts to put it back together.

Opening sequence shows the little spaceship hit by a small asteroid/big rock...looks like a low enough velocity to not destry the ship, so it just crashes.

Good: no ship noises, no impact noise.

Bad: the stars move, the ship has the rocket running the whole time, and each night you balst back off into space, but are limited from landing further from the original impact point until you get parts.

Also parts scattered randomly and not strung out in a line (asuming the impact was deep enough in the gravirty well for them all to land on the planet, however--if it was further away, theyed be in seperate orbits so wouldn't even hit the planet at all.

gotta go now....

tazmandevil3
2003-Mar-26, 03:47 AM
I have Pikmin, and it's a great game.

tracer
2003-Mar-29, 05:43 AM
Good: no ship noises, no impact noise.
Yeah -- but the same can be said for ALL YOUR BASE ARE BELONG TO US.

Jediblade
2003-Apr-19, 11:57 AM
You are also assuming that all of the parts survive reentry, even from low orbit. most of the smaller pieces would have hit terminal velocity and been vaporized by the re-entry friction. Especially as they would be jagged from and irregular from the initial impact and thus more venerable to the heat from the friction.

Mark Skarr
2003-Apr-19, 09:25 PM
Um . . . it's a Gamecube game. Come on. I'm not expecting accurate rocket science from Nintendo. You can buy an Apollo lander in Animal Crossing. They're both fun games, and I'm not looking for science accuracy. Now, if they just made those controllers in a size for people with gigantic hands . . ..

Wingnut Ninja
2003-Apr-20, 02:08 AM
You are also assuming that all of the parts survive reentry, even from low orbit. most of the smaller pieces would have hit terminal velocity and been vaporized by the re-entry friction. Especially as they would be jagged from and irregular from the initial impact and thus more venerable to the heat from the friction.

I hardly think such spacecraft parts as the Extraordinary Bolt and the Zirconium Rotor would be damaged by such trivial things as heat and pressure. :p

Reacher
2003-Apr-22, 02:06 PM
Especially as they would be jagged from and irregular from the initial impact and thus more venerable to the heat from the friction

Compression, my friend, not friction.

RickoniX
2003-Apr-28, 04:29 PM
Um . . . it's a Gamecube game. Come on. I'm not expecting accurate rocket science from Nintendo. You can buy an Apollo lander in Animal Crossing. They're both fun games, and I'm not looking for science accuracy. Now, if they just made those controllers in a size for people with gigantic hands . . ..I've got one between my moon and my giant green pipe