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Diablo-X
2006-May-09, 04:47 PM
there are many stories about how jfk died and, my only question is what kind of weapon kill him

vonmazur
2006-May-09, 05:18 PM
It was a Modelo D' 1938, Caliber 6.5 mm Mannlicher Carcano, serial number was "C 2766" (IIRC!) These guns were made for the elite "Garda Del Duce" and the stocks were painted black. This gun was made by Fabrica D' Arma D' Terni in Northern Italy in 1940. The scopes were installed by the exporter in Italy and sold through various outlets in the US. The sling, which was called a "dog leash" by some so-called "experts", was actually the shoulder strap from a Navy Pilots' Holster, I cannot think of anything else about the gun that is unusual right off hand. The Ammunition was loaded by Winchester-Western Cartridge Company in E. Alton Il, by the US Government contract for the Greek Civil war in the late 1940's. This became surplus after the defeat of the Soviet Communists in Greece, so it was sold in the US to people who bought these guns.....This was full metal jacket military ammo, NOT hunting ammo..

If anyone here can add to this, have at it....I am a gunsmith and sell and collect these things, but I do not have any Italian Rifles on hand to compare, so I might be wrong about some information......

Dale in Ala

BertL
2006-May-09, 05:53 PM
My guess is a potato.

Either that, or a gun.

twinstead
2006-May-09, 05:56 PM
My guess is a potato.

Either that, or a gun.

I concur; it was either a potato or a gun.

aporetic_r
2006-May-09, 06:16 PM
It could not have been a potato. The potato found in the car had very little damage to it, rather than the bruises and cuts that it would have gotten if it had gone through flesh and bone. And, from where it was located, it would have had to be some sort of magical potato to change direction in mid-flight to make it follow the trajectory the official investigation claimed it followed.

Aporetic

Gillianren
2006-May-09, 08:11 PM
Have I mentioned how very much I love you all? Defending the virtue of innocent potatoes and all.

_DRAGONLORD_
2006-May-09, 08:16 PM
A sniper.

BertL
2006-May-09, 08:44 PM
Have I mentioned how very much I love you all? Defending the virtue of innocent potatoes and all.
Potatoes aren't innocent. They are the root of all evil. The root of all evil, I tell ya!

- BertL, who once choked on one.

tofu
2006-May-09, 08:48 PM
Very good info vonmazur. You obviously know your guns.

Swift
2006-May-09, 09:22 PM
A Tom Paxton song about protecting potatoes (http://www.mydfz.com/Paxton/lyrics/dstp.htm)

PhantomWolf
2006-May-09, 09:47 PM
MMmmmm, the root vegetable of earthly delights.

BertL
2006-May-09, 10:34 PM
Potatoes should die a horrible death. They work together with, like, NASA and the governemnt and stuff to take over the world. And they're doing a scarily fine job on it, I must say.

tbm
2006-May-09, 10:56 PM
It was a Modelo D' 1938, Caliber 6.5 mm Mannlicher Carcano, serial number was "C 2766" (IIRC!) These guns were made for the elite "Garda Del Duce" and the stocks were painted black. This gun was made by Fabrica D' Arma D' Terni in Northern Italy in 1940. The scopes were installed by the exporter in Italy and sold through various outlets in the US. The sling, which was called a "dog leash" by some so-called "experts", was actually the shoulder strap from a Navy Pilots' Holster, I cannot think of anything else about the gun that is unusual right off hand. The Ammunition was loaded by Winchester-Western Cartridge Company in E. Alton Il, by the US Government contract for the Greek Civil war in the late 1940's. This became surplus after the defeat of the Soviet Communists in Greece, so it was sold in the US to people who bought these guns.....This was full metal jacket military ammo, NOT hunting ammo..

If anyone here can add to this, have at it....I am a gunsmith and sell and collect these things, but I do not have any Italian Rifles on hand to compare, so I might be wrong about some information......

Dale in Ala

Yep, your info is spot on. I currently own an M38 Carcano short rifle, very similar to the Kennedy weapon, the chief difference is the caliber, 6.5mm vs 7.35mm. The action is the same in form and function. I bring this up because the CTs always claim the gun cannot be fired in the time frame the assasination occured. However, with practice (as Oswald no doubt had), three aimed shots can certainly be fired in the space that the shots occured during the assasination. I am not a gun dealer but I have had an interest in guns and ammunition for many years. BTW, Dale, do you have any of the editions of Cartridges of the World (Barnes)?

tbm

AGN Fuel
2006-May-09, 11:12 PM
It could not have been a potato. The potato found in the car had very little damage to it, rather than the bruises and cuts that it would have gotten if it had gone through flesh and bone. And, from where it was located, it would have had to be some sort of magical potato to change direction in mid-flight to make it follow the trajectory the official investigation claimed it followed.

Aporetic

Yet - look at the way it was peeled. Back and to the left, back...and to the left....

People, the implication is clear - No right handed chef peeled this potato.

tbm
2006-May-09, 11:49 PM
Potatoes should die a horrible death. They work together with, like, NASA and the governemnt and stuff to take over the world. And they're doing a scarily fine job on it, I must say.

Oh, potatoes have had it bad, too. Don't forget the Great Potato Famine, where billions of potatoes died a terrible, icky black death. Didn't do the Irish people much good, either.

tbm

PhantomWolf
2006-May-10, 12:22 AM
It's a conspriacy. There is hardly a food shop, office, school or home without potatos in them. They are taking over......

aporetic_r
2006-May-10, 04:29 AM
Yet - look at the way it was peeled. Back and to the left, back...and to the left....


But if you just turn the potato around...

Aporetic

AGN Fuel
2006-May-10, 06:00 AM
But if you just turn the potato around...

Aporetic

Turned around - are you suggesting the potato came not from the Chip Depository, but from the grassy knoll?

Hmmm, interesting idea. However, I believe that you will find that in Dallas in October, the grassy knoll had an aspect that would only be getting full sun in the morning. This would delay the germination for up to 2-3 weeks. Such a potato would only just be sprouting in that case and clearly could not have been the one used. Nice idea, my friend, but no dice!!

However, I have a rival theory - the assassination was Soviet organised, with the potato launched and targeted from an orbiting Spud-nik satellite.

Gillianren
2006-May-10, 07:25 AM
Turned around - are you suggesting the potato came not from the Chip Depository, but from the grassy knoll?

Hmmm, interesting idea. However, I believe that you will find that in Dallas in October, the grassy knoll had an aspect that would only be getting full sun in the morning. This would delay the germination for up to 2-3 weeks. Such a potato would only just be sprouting in that case and clearly could not have been the one used. Nice idea, my friend, but no dice!!

However, I have a rival theory - the assassination was Soviet organised, with the potato launched and targeted from an orbiting Spud-nik satellite.

Well, you do have to explain things apparently happening in October instead of November as the "official story" would have you believe.

BertL
2006-May-10, 01:03 PM
It's a conspriacy. There is hardly a food shop, office, school or home without potatos in them. They are taking over......
I told yer!

The "potatoes have it bad" argument is nonsense. It's just a coverup to make people feel pityful for potatoes. Besides, nobody would suspect the "victim"... I can't believe so many people are fooled!

twinstead
2006-May-10, 01:12 PM
I have always suspected that potatoes control all the world's governments like puppets on a string. Sure, they look harmless, but that's exactly what they want you to think!

tbm
2006-May-10, 03:17 PM
P'raps spuds are really hairless Tribbles? Oh, the HORROR!!!

tbm

Sigma_Orionis
2006-May-10, 03:41 PM
Hmmm, time to round up the usual Potato Heads.....

ranb
2006-May-10, 04:01 PM
I own a 1948 6.5mm carcano identical to Oswald's, except it does not have a scope. I suspect that mine is not in as good condition as his was back in 1963. It shoots high at 100 yards using 162 grain ammo, and I can only place the rounds into a 4 inch group or so. Not good, but good enough to use in Dallas. The bolt operates quickly as long as there is a bit of oil on it. The bore is actually .268-.269 inches, while the winchester bullets are .264 inches. This contributes to the rather mundane accuracy in my opinion.

Ranb

vonmazur
2006-May-10, 09:56 PM
Guys: I do not have Barnes book handy here, but there is a somewhat large variation in the bores of Italian Rifles. I have often wondered if the FBI measured LHO's gun for this factor.

I think that I read somewhere, that the Italian Gunsmiths who put the scopes on the batch of guns that included LHO's, had worked on the actions to make them smooth like a commercial rifle.

Dale

Cl1mh4224rd
2006-May-10, 11:07 PM
Potatoes should die a horrible death. They work together with, like, NASA and the governemnt and stuff to take over the world. And they're doing a scarily fine job on it, I must say.
Attack of the Killer... Potatoes?

But worry not, Earth citizen. Take comfort in the fact that millions of potatoes are brutally tortured every day, before being consumed by others of your kind!

mugaliens
2006-May-10, 11:12 PM
Viking Throwing Spear: http://members.aol.com/dargolyt/TheForge/spear.htm

And as any history buff knows, the Vikings transmogricated the worldwide spud production into a meaningless whole.

Swift
2006-May-11, 04:01 AM
You know, potatoes as part of the whole gov-mint conspiracy is starting to make sense. They are the perfect spy - just look at all those eyes!

kookbreaker
2006-May-12, 02:09 PM
I'd like to make a point about Oswald's scope. It is often referred to as being 'cheap' by JFK conspiracists, who in older days also used to point out that it was 'Japanese made'. In this modern age of high end Japanese electronics and automobiles, it is hard to conceive of an era when Japanese goods were seens as junky and unreliable, but such an era did exist.

There is one problem with derisively calling Oswald's scope a 'Cheap Japanses scope'. Even as Japan was dragging itself out of the postwar era and trying to re-industrialize, they had an optics industry that was excellent, and very rigidly controlled by government standards. In short, there is no such thing as bad Japanese optics.

Nearly every binocular, monocular, telescope, and rifle scope in Japan is made to rigid standards required by the government's rather intrusive attempt to extend the wartime military standards into one of its few intact industries. The result is that Japanese optics have a shining reputation rivalling the most expensive German and Austrian optics.

Oswald's scope might have been 'cheap' but it certainly was not 'junk'. I always object when some refer to it as such.

Sorry, just a pet peeve of mine.

SpitfireIX
2006-May-12, 04:27 PM
I'd like to make a point about Oswald's scope. It is often referred to as being 'cheap' by JFK conspiracists, who in older days also used to point out that it was 'Japanese made'.

They also like to point out that the scope was damaged, while conveniently ignoring the very strong possibility that that damage occurred when Oswald hastily shoved his rifle in between some boxes in order to conceal it. The conspiracists also don't tell people that Oswald might not even have used the scope; at the ranges at which he was firing, the "iron" sights would have been adequate for a well-trained shooter.

Here is an article (http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/zirbel.txt) from McAdams' web site dealing with Oswald's ability to make the shots that addresses these and other issues.

John McAdams

One additional -- and important -- thing to remember is that the shots in all of these shooting tests landed consistently high and to the right by a few inches. This was because the scope on Oswald's rifle was damaged.

No one knows when the scope was damaged, or whether Oswald even used the scope -- as opposed to the iron sights that were more than adequate for the distances involved in Dealey Plaza. If the scope was damaged when Oswald jammed it into a stack of boxes on his way down from the sixth floor of the depository, all the shooters in the Warren Commission tests were shooting with a handicap that Oswald didn't have.

Even as Japan was dragging itself out of the postwar era and trying to re-industrialize, they had an optics industry that was excellent, and very rigidly controlled by government standards. In short, there is no such thing as bad Japanese optics.

I came across an article (http://www2.arts.ubc.ca/bcar/no13/articles/alexander/article.pdf) from the British Columbia Asia Review that discusses this issue in great detail.


Jeff Alexander

...the financial and motivational support of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) for research and design initiatives involving experimental weapons and related military hardware was the primary driving force behind Japanís overall technological progress made in the field of optical engineering....the IJNís investments in optical munitions production laid much of the foundation for Japanís post-war optical industryóenabling the emergent companies to capitalize directly upon designs theretofore produced strictly for use by the armed forces. As a result, companies such as Nikon, Fuji, Canon, and Minolta were able to retool in the earliest stages of the occupation and begin directing their designs and manufacturing processes toward the swift capture of civilian consumer markets....although the investments made by the IJN in these military research projects were the primary force that carried such technological understanding forward into the post-war era, Japanís defeat in World War Two did not interrupt the process.

jt-3d
2006-May-12, 07:54 PM
it is hard to conceive of an era when Japanese goods were seens as junky and unreliable, but such an era did exist.


Oh I clearly remember when 'Made in Japan' was concidered a joke and an insult. When something broke the standard reply was 'Must have been made in Japan'. Not hard for me to concieve of at all. I just wish our stuff was still better. It's a Japanese conspiracy I tell ya.

mugaliens
2006-May-12, 08:11 PM
I believe it was a self-inflicted wound. The world's first esophogeal explosion as a result of violently choking on a potato.

mugaliens
2006-May-12, 08:12 PM
Oh I clearly remember when 'Made in Japan' was concidered a joke and an insult. When something broke the standard reply was 'Must have been made in Japan'. Not hard for me to concieve of at all. I just wish our stuff was still better. It's a Japanese conspiracy I tell ya.

Nope. Sad to say, it appears the potatoes have hornswaggled the Japanese.

Diablo-X
2006-May-14, 05:58 PM
was a silencer used it could have been an assult weapon you dont use normal ammo for those it is hard to come by an assult weapon and you keep silecers :wall:

on a side note people should stop joking about vegitables:evil: :mad:

SpitfireIX
2006-May-14, 06:31 PM
was a silencer used it could have been an assult weapon you dont use normal ammo for those it is hard to come by an assult weapon and you keep silecers :wall:

As has been mentioned, it is impossible to effectively suppress most rifle and carbine ammunition, as there is a distinctive "crack" from the bullet's supersonic flight. Pistols and submachine guns are the most likely candidates for sound suppression. Most pistol ammunition is considerably larger than 6.5 mm, which would have been problematic for the "lone assassin" theory.

on a side note people should stop joking about vegitables:evil: :mad:

Or else we're going to be attacked by killer tomatoes? :D

PhantomWolf
2006-May-14, 08:25 PM
Or else we're going to be attacked by killer tomatoes?

Well actually a Tomato is a fruit. ;)

SpitfireIX
2006-May-14, 08:28 PM
Or else we're going to be attacked by killer tomatoes?

Well actually a Tomato is a fruit. ;)
No, that's just what they want you to think, so that you won't suspect they're part of the vegetable plot to rule the world....

twinstead
2006-May-14, 09:03 PM
No, that's just what they want you to think, so that you won't suspect they're part of the vegetable plot to rule the world....

I for one welcome our vegetable overlords

SolusLupus
2006-May-14, 10:21 PM
I for one welcome our vegetable overlords

I don't. I will welcome the T-Bone Steak overlords, though.

SpitfireIX
2006-May-14, 11:11 PM
I don't. I will welcome the T-Bone Steak overlords, though.

So, obviously you're a vegan, as the T-Bone overlords will clearly ban the eating of meat. :D

SolusLupus
2006-May-15, 12:03 AM
I didn't say I welcomed them to be in charge.

The whole point of overlords is to overthrow them, and eat them of their tender, barbequed meat.

Mellow
2006-May-23, 12:31 PM
Alien - "Why, Kirk, what is this potato of which you speak?"

Kirk - "Well, on earth, when two people.... feel..something.... for.... each other.... they press their lips together"

Alien - "yes yes, the kiss I know, I know, but what is this Potato thinggy?"

Sigma_Orionis
2006-May-23, 02:30 PM
I didn't say I welcomed them to be in charge.

The whole point of overlords is to overthrow them, and eat them of their tender, barbequed meat.

I second that, our duty is to serve the T-Bone overlords........ with BBQ sauce, a mountain of french fries and a case of nice ice cold beer :lol:

PD. No, I haven't had breakfast.

ggremlin
2006-May-23, 02:46 PM
:think: Humm, Where did the expression, "You can indict a ham sandwich." come from"? Sounds suspicious to me.

WHarris
2006-May-23, 03:03 PM
:think: Humm, Where did the expression, "You can indict a ham sandwich." come from"? Sounds suspicious to me.

I've heard it used on Law and Order, but that probably isn't the origin.

pghnative
2006-May-23, 05:28 PM
There is a lot wrong with this thread.

First, a T-bone should be grilled, broiled, or even seared/roasted -- it should not be barbequed.

2nd, a tomato is a vegetable according to the US Congress --- what higher authority do you need?;)

Finally
Don't forget the Great Potato Famine,
hmmm -- JFK was Irish, and the Irish were Irish --- it seems that potatoes are ethnists

ggremlin
2006-May-23, 05:43 PM
2nd, a tomato is a vegetable according to the US Congress --- what higher authority do you need?;)



:naughty:The U.S. Surpreme Court would be a good start. Ruled that a tomato was a vegetable in 1893.

pghnative
2006-May-23, 09:21 PM
Ahhh -- you're right (http://home.howstuffworks.com/question143.htm). I thought it had been legislated in, but I see that it came down to a Supreme court interpretation.

Sigma_Orionis
2006-May-24, 01:24 PM
There is a lot wrong with this thread.
First, a T-bone should be grilled, broiled, or even seared/roasted -- it should not be barbequed.


Spoilsport :D

Rift
2006-May-24, 09:40 PM
Another point the assasination conspricacy supporters try to say is that Oswald was a poor shot, and couldn't have made the shots in that quick of a sequence.

1- this is a flat out lie. Oswald was a superb shot and a Marine Sharp Shooter. My dad was one in the army and they don't give that appelation to merely anbody. Marine records show that Oswald routinely made 90+% of his shots at twice the distance Kennedy was from Oswald.

2- I saw a documentary recently that debunked every aspect of a conspiracy. In it a 70 year old man shot off a gun identicle to Oswald's (it may have been THE gun, i don't remember), taking time to aim and everything and manage to squeeze off 3 bullets in the same time Oswald did.

BTW, I live in the Kansas City area where 99% of the population grills or barbeque. Even here people confuse grilling with barbequeing. grrrrr.

Hern
2006-May-26, 02:35 AM
I must agree that the 'multiple-eyed' monster must be destroyed!
Baked, fried, boiled, lightly buttered, some sour cream...
Heck, maybe the Russians were influenced by those little critters when they sacrificed themselves by the millions to produce that delicious liquid variety that's so addictive.
Oh no, I've been infected and influenced!

Maksutov
2006-May-26, 02:47 AM
Call any vegetable,
And the chances are good,
That the vegetable will respond to you!

(What a pumpkin!)

mugaliens
2006-Jun-05, 12:21 AM
The potato claim fails in the light of modern aerodymics, which clearly shows that vegetable matter does not posses the density to travel the requisite distance and impace the target with the requisite momentum to cause the harm that was recorded at the site.

Thus, only lead, or perhaps, copper-jacketed lead bullets, could have caused the injury given the distances involved.

jimc5499
2006-Jun-22, 03:37 PM
The potato claim fails in the light of modern aerodymics, which clearly shows that vegetable matter does not posses the density to travel the requisite distance and impace the target with the requisite momentum to cause the harm that was recorded at the site.

Thus, only lead, or perhaps, copper-jacketed lead bullets, could have caused the injury given the distances involved.


Ok. It must have been an aluminum foil jacketed potato then.

Laguna
2006-Jun-22, 06:43 PM
Ok. It must have been an aluminum foil jacketed potato then.
Or maybe one with a tinfoil hat.

Frantic Freddie
2006-Jun-22, 07:07 PM
The potato claim fails in the light of modern aerodymics, which clearly shows that vegetable matter does not posses the density to travel the requisite distance and impace the target with the requisite momentum to cause the harm that was recorded at the site.

Thus, only lead, or perhaps, copper-jacketed lead bullets, could have caused the injury given the distances involved.

My friend's potato cannon can lob those suckers a good 200 yards! :D

Mellow
2006-Jul-13, 09:52 AM
llama-ninja?

mugaliens
2006-Jul-14, 09:52 PM
Ok. It must have been an aluminum foil jacketed potato then.

That would not have materially affected the ballistics.

Instead, I'm leaning towards the depleted uranium potato theory, where Idaho potatoes, grown in the downwind sector of the Hanford nuclear site might have possessed enough mass to actually permeated long distances of air and body mass without breaking up and while creating enough mass on target to accomplish the goal of terminating one of our most revered Presidents.

Sadly, it appears that JFK may have been the victem of DPU-spud technology.

May God rest his soul, and LHO, you expletive, as well as all who financed your exposition.

BigDon
2006-Jul-19, 08:51 PM
As the owner and operator of several nice firearms, and having several friends who are collectors of WWII era weapons I can say that the 1948 6.5mm carcano is a pretty crappy firearm. I'm not saying this wasn't the murder weapon, just that I wouldn't own one if you offered it to me for free.

Now this potato thing...

I'm sure all of you are aware the deadliest faction of the potato mafia are the green ones. The green ones even kill folks who like potatos. They're out of control and a loose cannon to most of the rest of Solanidoms plots of world conquest.

jt-3d
2006-Jul-20, 03:24 AM
It's no secret that the carcano is crap but Oswald wasn't rich and the thing was like $10 if I recall.

Tog
2006-Jul-20, 07:07 AM
It's no secret that the carcano is crap but Oswald wasn't rich and the thing was like $10 if I recall.
I've seen a few sources that said the rifle wasn't as bad as people are led to think. It wasn't in the same class as a Garand, but it certainly wasn't as bad as many others out there. If he had a good one, and actually spent time to learn it, and had a good day, it would have been a snap.

I went to the range with my dad one time not too long ago. A friend of his was up there with a 45-70 that had a weak hammer spring. Sometimes it wouldn't go off, and the recoil would shift the rear sight over every shot, so it had to be placed back to the center point by hand. This was an old design called a 'falling block' action. It's been around since the late 1800's. I fired 40 rounds that day. (He was fire forming the brass for reloading so they just needed to to go off. It was busy work.) Someone had taped a baseball bat to the target frame 100 yards away so I took a few shots at it. I was having a very good day. Open sights with an unfamiliar rifle with a high recoil that may or may not go off when you fire it and I hit the baseball bat about 50% of the time eventually breaking off everything but the handle which was split in half with the last shot.

If Oswald had had that kind of day, there would have only been a need for one shot from any rifle that was accepted into military service. I've never had a day like that before, or since.

BigDon
2006-Jul-20, 09:06 AM
Tog-My father was the most phenominal shot I've ever seen. He was farm-raised in the Oregon desert. While his brothers were fighting WWII and his dad worked the farm he spent his preteen and early teen years supplimenting the family income by shooting rabbits for the meat.

Since the terrain is so flat the rabbits can see you coming a long way off so most shots were made at 100 yards plus. Had two Borzoi as retrievers and personal security. He said he needed 100 hits per 100 shots to make enough money to buy another box of ammo, give his mother two dollars and have some for the movies on Saturday. (He got 3 cents apiece for them)

So instead of the Xbox or Playstation he spent his youth becoming a really good shot. I've seen him take his Ruger 10/22, (now my oldest daughter's), throw a spent shotgun shell into the air, and keep it aloft until all ten rounds were gone. Firing from the hip. Totally amazed me everytime he did that. Another good one was when he would take the Ruger and fire over his shoulder (using his thumb) while looking at the target through a handmirror.

And I don't even want to tell you what happened the time he was teaching me to shoot when I was about 15 and I blew down the barrel of a .45 auto "just like in the movies". :doh: That was the very last time I did that. "You do realize you just pointed a loaded gun at your own head?" Was about the only thing he said during the next few minutes that I can print here. And Dad wasn't a swearing or yelling type of guy.

I miss him.

jt-3d
2006-Jul-20, 11:50 AM
Yeah cowboys didn't use semi-autos.


I've seen a few sources that said the rifle wasn't as bad as people are led to think. It wasn't in the same class as a Garand, but it certainly wasn't as bad as many others out there. If he had a good one, and actually spent time to learn it, and had a good day, it would have been a snap.


Right, it obviously wasn't all that bad given what Oswald managed with it. I should have said something like not top of the line.

mugaliens
2006-Jul-20, 07:53 PM
I miss him.

I'm sure you do, BigDon - sounds like the kind of Dad every kid should have. My Dad blew his stack only once, but boy, I sure knew when I disappointed him.

Tog
2006-Jul-20, 08:34 PM
Tog-My father was the most phenominal shot I've ever seen. ..Big snip... And Dad wasn't a swearing or yelling type of guy.

Mine grew up in the mining towns in Idaho. He wasn't ever an amazing shot like what you describe, but he's always really lucky when ne needs to be. He's also really good about knowing when he just got really lucky and stopping and acting like it was planned. People that know him will just roll their eyes, but those that just see him test fire a pistol and unscrew the cap off a milk jug at 20 feet by grazing the cap, then saying, "Eh seems to go where I point it", walk away stunned.:p

On the whole, he's a really good shot. The guy that ran the custom gunsmith shop next to his old range would bring thing to my dad to test fire as the final step before deciding to send them on.

I've mentioned some of the arguments on this thread and other JFK threads to him and his view is that there was never any question the shots were possible for Oswald. It would have been easier than than hitting a running rabbit.

ranb
2007-Aug-09, 11:00 PM
Is it too late to reply to this thread again?

I finally got around to putting a scope on my 6.5mm Carcano. It is still a piece of crap rifle. But it is nearly identical to the one Oswald used. It has a 4 power scope like his, but the tube is 25 mm not 18mm. The scope mount is also sturdier. I'm sure my barrel is much more worn out than his was. Mine is so worn and pitted that ammo that should clock 2100 fps only moves 1860 fps. I bumped up the powder charge by 10% to achieve 2000 fps.

Out at the range, it groups about 4 inches at 100 yards, not so good. But the bolt operates quickly as long as it has a bit of oil on the rails. I can shoot it three times in under 4 seconds, it takes me a bit under six seconds to put three rounds into an eight inch target, shooting left handed. It is a bit harder left handed as I have to move my face away from the scope more to cycle the bolt, but it is not difficult to hit the target quickly three times.

Ranb

Kelfazin
2007-Aug-09, 11:03 PM
Is it too late to reply to this thread again?

Well, the rules changed since this was posted. The CT forum only allows space/astronomy related threads now. So most likely this will be locked.

Occam
2007-Aug-09, 11:20 PM
Potatoes aren't innocent. They are the root of all evil. The root of all evil, I tell ya!

- BertL, who once choked on one.
Yes, they are evil... but they're not roots, they are tubers.
TUBERcolosis kills millions each year. If I had my way, they'd all fry

ToSeek
2007-Aug-10, 12:24 AM
No longer an appropriate topic for this forum - thread closed.