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Fraser
2006-May-09, 06:17 PM
SUMMARY: When astronauts return to the Moon, to explore and eventually build a moon base, they're going to need oxygen... and lots of it. Fortunately lunar soil - or regolith - is almost half oxygen. NASA researchers are using a technique called vacuum pyrolysis, where the regolith is heated until it releases oxygen. Light from the Sun was focused by a lens to heat lunar soil to 2,500 degrees C. As much as 20% of the soil was converted to free oxygen, and the leftover slag could be used for bricks, radiation shielding or pavement.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/breathing_o2_moonrocks.html)
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antoniseb
2006-May-09, 07:29 PM
The first products of the robotic factories we build on the moon should be photo-voltaic cells, oxygen, and bottles to store the oxygen.

GBendt
2006-May-10, 01:28 PM
If you heat up a metal oxide or non-metal oxide to a temperature high enough to break up the oxide, the oxide will break up into oxygen, metals and non-metals. As soon as the temperature falls below the breakup temperature of an oxide, the oxide is rebuilt. This is the common reversal of a chemical reaction.

You need a means to separate the oxygen while the temperature is avove the oxide´s breakup temperature, and store the oxygen in something that does not react with oxygen at that temperature ...

I am afraid this problem has not yet been solved.


Regards,

Günther

antoniseb
2006-May-10, 01:46 PM
You need a means to separate the oxygen while the temperature is avove the oxide´s breakup temperature, and store the oxygen in something that does not react with oxygen at that temperature ...

I am afraid this problem has not yet been solved.

Suppose, for example, that the rocks are heated inside a sealed chimney. The Oxygen expands and cools very rapidly, to become Oxygen gas, which can be drawn off at the top of the chimney, while any metal vapors end up depositing separated metals on the sides of the chimney.