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Mainframes
2003-Mar-28, 12:54 PM
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/solarsystem/midwest_meteors_030228.html

Just found this on space.com, anyone live over that way see anything personally?

[edit] Is it just me or are space.com getting sloppy with their technical use of the words meteoroid/meteor/meteorite??

gethen
2003-Mar-28, 01:31 PM
Wow! I'm a little far north for that and didnt' hear or see a thing, but neither did I see anything on the a.m. news. What a pity. Would have been a great experience.

ToSeek
2003-Mar-28, 06:17 PM
Chicago Tribune article (http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-030337meteorite,0,610488.story?coll=chi-news-hed): Meteorite showers fragments on Park Forest, south of Chicago.

beskeptical
2003-Mar-28, 09:43 PM
Those folks don't know how lucky they are. I'm ready to head for the area and start looking. But, I just can't get away right now, darn. Wonder how long it takes to drive there from here.

Kaptain K
2003-Mar-28, 09:52 PM
Minor quibble. Why is it that states between the Mississippi river and Pennsylvania are called "midwest, when the center of the contiguous 48 states is 1 1/2 states west of the Mississippi (in the middle of Kansas)? :-? :roll:

Tom
2003-Mar-28, 11:30 PM
Everybody knows that meteors strike big cities first, especially skyscrapers, which attract meteors the same as they attract lightning. And these "space rocks" were tiny, cold, and harmless! They didn't start major fires, or produce mutations in the plantlife and townspeople.

Sheesh! Don't these people know anything about REAL ASTRONOMY?

SKY
2003-Mar-28, 11:40 PM
From the article above:


Sipiera said it's very rare for meteorites to fall on populated areas.

...``I always tell my wife that when I die, I hope I get hit in the head by a meteorite flying through the roof and it came pretty close,'' he said.


I'd quit saying that from now on. :D

aporetic_r
2003-Mar-28, 11:58 PM
I was lucky enough to see a couple of these while driving across at night a few days ago. Being a city-dweller, that's a rare treat for me. Alas, I was driving with a guy who didn't realize that the Moon can be seen during the day, so he was completely uninterested.

Aporetic

kilopi
2003-Mar-29, 12:56 AM
Minor quibble. Why is it that states between the Mississippi river and Pennsylvania are called "midwest, when the center of the contiguous 48 states is 1 1/2 states west of the Mississippi (in the middle of Kansas)? :-? :roll:
Well, the Rockies are considered part of the West. I guess they're just in the middle, to the west of the East. :)

beskeptical
2003-Mar-29, 02:09 AM
Minor quibble. Why is it that states between the Mississippi river and Pennsylvania are called "midwest, when the center of the contiguous 48 states is 1 1/2 states west of the Mississippi (in the middle of Kansas)? :-? :roll:
Well, the Rockies are considered part of the West. I guess they're just in the middle, to the west of the East. :)

Silly boys, it's the 'midwest' of the planet, not of the continental US, of course.

stargirl
2003-Mar-29, 09:17 AM
Wouldn’t you know I came in from stargazing about a half-hour before it hit. :( I live about 50 miles north of there. I did see some footage on the news last night. Unfortunately the cameraman was to busy filming some firefighters to pan up, I bet he could kick himself now. Anyway the sky went form pitch black to very bright, like early twilight. I would have loved to add something like that to the list of memorable meteors I’ve seen.

DStahl
2003-Mar-29, 10:22 AM
"[Commander Mike McNamara of the Park Forest Police Department] said the debris field appears to cover a path about 80 miles long by 20 miles wide from north of Bloomington, Ill., to Chicago's south side and possibly part of northwestern Indiana."

"He said all of the pieces came from a stony meteorite he estimates was about the size of a Volkswagen bug when it exploded as it plunged into Earth's atmosphere."

Wow. That is really, really cool. So a stony meteorite of that size can, depending on its angle of impact and velocity, create a shock that blows it apart before it hits the ground. From this page (http://gwest.gats-inc.com/research/dust/cosmic_dust_page.html):

"It is estimated that nearly 44 metric tons of meteoric material enter the Earth’s atmosphere daily.... Meteorites are the surviving portion of a meteoroid, and micrometeorites are particles that are too small to reach their boiling point. Meteoric materials are oxidized by collision with atmospheric O2, and vapor resulting from meteoroid ablation condenses to form 'smoke' particles in the mesosphere..."

beskeptical
2003-Mar-29, 10:38 AM
Wouldn’t you know I came in from stargazing about a half-hour before it hit. :( I live about 50 miles north of there. I did see some footage on the news last night. Unfortunately the cameraman was to busy filming some firefighters to pan up, I bet he could kick himself now. Anyway the sky went form pitch black to very bright, like early twilight. I would have loved to add something like that to the list of memorable meteors I’ve seen.

How can you not go meteorite hunting when you are that close? I wanna go. :(

David Hall
2003-Mar-29, 12:24 PM
Minor quibble. Why is it that states between the Mississippi river and Pennsylvania are called "midwest, when the center of the contiguous 48 states is 1 1/2 states west of the Mississippi (in the middle of Kansas)? :-? :roll:

Serious answer: Because the area got that name before those western states entered the union. At one time it actually was the midwest; then more states were added and the "midwest" actually became part of the east. But by that time we were stuck with the name.

It's the same reason "The South" is actually only the southeastern US.

beskeptical
2003-Mar-30, 10:50 AM
David, you are a fountain of knowledge!

Vermonter
2003-Mar-30, 02:51 PM
This last Thursday I spied a meteorite with my eyes. I was looking at Saturn outside and saw the streak of light and a flash. I saw it and my uncle didn't :D so the night was good. My location is Central Vermont, btw.

Kaptain K
2003-Mar-30, 04:05 PM
Vermonter,
What you saw was a meteor. It's not a meteorite until it hits the surface.

A meteoroid is a small bit of cosmic debis (a large chunk is an asteroid).
A meteor is the flash of light caused by a meteoroid hitting the atmosphere.
A meteorite is a meteoroid on the surface.

PS I said "surface" instead of "ground", because we had a minor flap some time ago about what to call it if it hit water. :roll:

astronomymanjoe
2003-Mar-30, 07:41 PM
David Hall=smart 8)

Kaptin K=smart 8)

Xaine=not so smart :cry:

David Hall
2003-Mar-30, 08:04 PM
David, you are a fountain of knowledge!

Well, thanks for the compliment (Xaine too), but all I did was use a knowledge of history and some reason. The USA expanded from east to west, so at one point that area must have been in the middle of the country. I've encountered the question before with people here.

But if you need more, here (http://phrases.shu.ac.uk/bulletin_board/7/messages/703.html) is a page to back it up.

Xaine, don't be so hard on yourself. Ignorance is not the same as lack of smarts. :-)

Dickenmeyer
2003-Mar-30, 08:41 PM
I thought that a co-worker of mine might have witnessed the meteor, I had shown her some viewing times for the International Space Station at http://Heavens-above.com and she described what she saw as much
brighter than what she expected and the ground track for ISS was very near Chicago too. She was looking the right direction to see the meteor but as it turns out the timing was all wrong and the direction of travel for the ISS versus the meteor was off as well so it was indeed the space station she saw.

On the subject of the Midwest, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 designated the area bounded by the Ohio river, the Mississippi river and the Great Lakes the Northwest Territory, and laid down the law on how territorial boundaries and legislatures and eventually statehood would be brought to the trans-Appalachian regions won from the British in the Revolution. At this time the Mississippi river was the western border of the United States. The area became known as the Old Northwest after the Louisiana Purchase and the Middle West to distinguish it from the Far West once settlement west of the Mississippi began in earnest and it became ridiculous to call the middle of the country "northwest". Context is everything, and at the time the Midwest was named the majority of the U.S. population still lived on the eastern seaboard and anywhere west of the Appalachians was still thought of as "out west", fighting in the western theater of war in the U.S. Civil War was mostly done east of the Mississippi, for example.

Vermonter
2003-Mar-30, 09:58 PM
Vermonter,
What you saw was a meteor. It's not a meteorite until it hits the surface.

A meteoroid is a small bit of cosmic debis (a large chunk is an asteroid).
A meteor is the flash of light caused by a meteoroid hitting the atmosphere.
A meteorite is a meteoroid on the surface.

PS I said "surface" instead of "ground", because we had a minor flap some time ago about what to call it if it hit water. :roll:

I stand corrected. Thanks for the clarification.

Kaptain K
2003-Mar-31, 03:42 AM
Hey we were all newbies once. :)

Mainframes
2003-Mar-31, 08:32 AM
David Hall=smart 8)

Kaptin K=smart 8)

Xaine=not so smart :cry:

Xaine = Learning --> therefore smart :D

HB'er = Not learning ----> Not so smart..... :roll:

ToSeek
2003-Apr-22, 05:00 PM
Sky and Telescope follow-up article. (http://skyandtelescope.com/news/current/article_936_1.asp)

ToSeek
2003-May-06, 05:12 PM
Meteorite in a Chicago living room (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030506.html)

Not the usual sort of photo I've come to expect from APOD, but interesting nonetheless. ;)

Wyvern
2003-May-06, 05:44 PM
I was actually awake when that happened. I wasn't too close to where the meteorites were found, but I remember the flash in the sky quite well - I was up trying to get my Masters thesis written. The sky basically lit up similar to that in a thunderstorm, although it was quite a bit brighter. As it was late and I was a bit burnt out, I thought that it was nothing more than lightning and went about my work. The lack of thunder somewhat surprised me, but I had other things on my mind.

The next morning when the news reports talked about the event complete with a video of the flash, I realized what I had seen the previous night. Pretty cool (unless your house was the impact site).

David Hall
2003-May-06, 06:08 PM
Actually, I think it would be pretty cool if my house was the impact site (as long as the fragment wasn't too large, that is :)). Imagine the story you could tell others later. And you can legitimately claim the meteorite as your own too!

Donnie B.
2003-May-06, 06:52 PM
Actually, I think it would be pretty cool if my house was the impact site (as long as the fragment wasn't too large, that is :)). Imagine the story you could tell others later. And you can legitimately claim the meteorite as your own too!
I agree completely, with the proviso that my head (or other body part) was not the final impact site of the space chunk.

By the way, I recently saw a short TV piece on a woman who is the only known person to be hit by falling space junk (man-made, that is). It was a piece of a satellite, weighed a couple kilograms, and grazed her shoulder as she was walking outside. If anyone else has been hit by reentering debris, it's not on the record.

R.A.F.
2003-May-06, 07:06 PM
If anyone else has been hit by reentering debris, it's not on the record.

Not wanting to disagree but...I seem to recall a story of a woman grazed on her hip by a meteor/meteorite. I remember seeing a picture of her hip and it looked like really bad road rash about 6 inches across. Unfortunately, thats all I remember about the incident.

ToSeek
2003-May-06, 10:21 PM
If anyone else has been hit by reentering debris, it's not on the record.

Not wanting to disagree but...I seem to recall a story of a woman grazed on her hip by a meteor/meteorite. I remember seeing a picture of her hip and it looked like really bad road rash about 6 inches across. Unfortunately, thats all I remember about the incident.

Scroll down for the photo (http://www.oberlin.edu/library/sciencelib/geo117/group9/group9.html)

Donnie B.
2003-May-07, 12:55 AM
If anyone else has been hit by reentering debris, it's not on the record.

Not wanting to disagree but...I seem to recall a story of a woman grazed on her hip by a meteor/meteorite. I remember seeing a picture of her hip and it looked like really bad road rash about 6 inches across. Unfortunately, thats all I remember about the incident.
I probably didn't make it clear enough, but I was referring to incidents involving man-made space junk, not natural meteorites.

kurtisw
2003-May-07, 03:00 AM
So, does homeowner's insurance cover meteorite damage? I remember
a story about a car hit by a meteorite, and the insurance not wanting to
pay. :P

Mainframes
2003-May-07, 10:32 AM
So, does homeowner's insurance cover meteorite damage? I remember
a story about a car hit by a meteorite, and the insurance not wanting to
pay. :P

It's the kind of thing that insurers manage to put into the broad category of 'Acts of God' that aren't usually covered.....

kucharek
2003-May-07, 11:08 AM
So, does homeowner's insurance cover meteorite damage? I remember
a story about a car hit by a meteorite, and the insurance not wanting to
pay. :P

It's the kind of thing that insurers manage to put into the broad category of 'Acts of God' that aren't usually covered.....

So that's a proof that God exists??? :roll:

Harald

Mainframes
2003-May-07, 11:36 AM
So, does homeowner's insurance cover meteorite damage? I remember
a story about a car hit by a meteorite, and the insurance not wanting to
pay. :P

It's the kind of thing that insurers manage to put into the broad category of 'Acts of God' that aren't usually covered.....

So that's a proof that God exists??? :roll:

Harald

Indeed, all this time we been having arguements about God's existance and all we needed to do was look in an insurance company's cover policies....!

I wonder if you could prove the exact cause behind some of these 'Acts' and get the company to pay out. I seriously doubt it, but if you don't try......

Pinemarten
2003-May-07, 11:47 AM
Cold meteorites, or fireproof carpet? I don't see any smoke, do you?

kilopi
2003-May-07, 01:42 PM
Cold meteorites, or fireproof carpet? I don't see any smoke, do you?
Cold meteorite, check out the addendum in what the BA says about it (http://www.badastronomy.com/bad/misc/meteoric.html).

beskeptical
2003-May-07, 07:08 PM
So, does homeowner's insurance cover meteorite damage? I remember
a story about a car hit by a meteorite, and the insurance not wanting to
pay. :P

No need to insure against meteorite damage. The payoff is going to be greater than the insurance would give you. http://nyrockman.com/peekskill.htm

David Hall
2003-May-08, 05:53 PM
No need to insure against meteorite damage. The payoff is going to be greater than the insurance would give you. http://nyrockman.com/peekskill.htm

Maybe ok for a car, but what if it crashes through my roof and lands in the toilet? :)

Pinemarten
2003-May-09, 07:33 AM
Cold meteorites, or fireproof carpet? I don't see any smoke, do you?
Cold meteorite, check out the addendum in what the BA says about it (http://www.badastronomy.com/bad/misc/meteoric.html).

Too much BA education from the media. Guess I need to study other sources more. :oops:

Mainframes
2003-May-09, 09:17 AM
No need to insure against meteorite damage. The payoff is going to be greater than the insurance would give you. http://nyrockman.com/peekskill.htm

Maybe ok for a car, but what if it crashes through my roof and lands in the toilet? :)

Don't flush? :D

ToSeek
2004-Apr-13, 09:48 PM
Nancy's former employer and my current one has a piece mentioning the Park Forest meteorite (http://www.csc.com/features/2004/14.shtml).

Kaptain K
2004-Apr-14, 10:02 AM
Bad astronomy in the picture caption:

Photo of a supernova—a star that has imploded at the end of its life—taken by Greg Redfern
The picture is of the Crab nebula, which is not a supernova, but a supernova remnant!