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Swift
2006-May-22, 06:53 PM
I happened upon this website from astrosociety.org (http://www.astrosociety.org/education/resources/scifiprint.html#collections) that lists science fiction stories with good science, organized by topic (black holes, cosmology, etc.).

Gildamere
2006-May-25, 11:05 AM
I happened upon this website from astrosociety.org (http://www.astrosociety.org/education/resources/scifiprint.html#collections) that lists science fiction stories with good science, organized by topic (black holes, cosmology, etc.).

Unfortunately it hasn't been updated since 2002. Why not make a sticky on this board, where scientifically sound SF stories are collected?

eburacum45
2006-May-25, 12:48 PM
I see that one of my favourite stories is there, Approaching Perimelasma by Geoffrey Landis; good science with a literal twist.

As much as I revere the good Doctor Asimov, I can never quite understand why people think that Nightfall is good science- exactly what kind of multiple system and what kind of orbit would have the characteristics of the one he described in that famous story?

MG1962A
2006-May-26, 02:38 AM
In Nightfall, Asimov ducked the question very nicely actually.

There is an arguement where some of the astronomers are debating that a planet orbiting around a single star was theoreticaly impossible.

I think the point being offered (in 1940 something) Just cause we cant figure it out, doesn't mean it can't be done.

Big Brother Dunk
2006-May-27, 03:00 AM
I see that one of my favourite stories is there, Approaching Perimelasma by Geoffrey Landis; good science with a literal twist.

As much as I revere the good Doctor Asimov, I can never quite understand why people think that Nightfall is good science- exactly what kind of multiple system and what kind of orbit would have the characteristics of the one he described in that famous story?

The problem I have with Nightfall is that astronomy as a science even exists. After all, if night occurs only once evey 2000 years, how could a science like that happen?

By the way, I never read it, I just saw the movie. Perhaps that problem is dealt with in the book.

GDwarf
2006-May-27, 10:38 PM
The problem I have with Nightfall is that astronomy as a science even exists. After all, if night occurs only once evey 2000 years, how could a science like that happen?

By the way, I never read it, I just saw the movie. Perhaps that problem is dealt with in the book.
Nope, mind you, if you had seven(?) suns in your sky you'd probably start studying them. Also, their astronomy is far behind what you'd expect from a civilization that advanced, I mean, they have cameras, and probably electricity, but the idea of gravity is considerd incredibly advanced, and I'd asume that a non geo-centric universe would've been quite an amazing idea even half a century before the story is set.

Edit: Actually, scratch the electricity, if they knew of that they'd doubtless have though of using arcing electricity as a kind of light, on the other hand it does seem strongly implied that they use it.

Edit 2: I've read the short story, but I've never seen the movie.

Rift
2006-May-28, 03:47 AM
The movie BITES, even Asmiov didn't like it.

DON'T SEE IT.

Read the short story, should take 30 minutes if that...

Edit: I agree this should be a sticky.