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View Full Version : Teaching a lesson about asteroids - how?



nebularain
2003-Apr-01, 05:07 PM
In my science methods class last night, our teacher handed out to us an example of a bad lesson plan. What she saw were things like the the objective not stating exactly what the teacher wanted the students to walk away from this lesson knowing, integrating small group discussions with questions that they had not the means to answer (i.e. "How fast fo you think an asteroid travels?" with no reference frames or info. to draw on), and such.

What I saw was completely different.


The student will be able to try to the best of their ability to (1) answer specific questions about asteroids and (2) predict the effects of an asteroid hitting the Atlantic Ocean.

The student will be able to analyze the effects of an asteroid hitting the Atlantic Ocean by watching a segment of a realistic movie (Deep Impact).

The student will be able to re-evaluate their origianl answers after watching and analyzing the asteroid hitting the ocean.
:o

So, how many errors do you see?
:lol:

SKY
2003-Apr-01, 05:39 PM
First one:



The student will be able to analyze the effects of an asteroid hitting the Atlantic Ocean by watching a segment of a realistic movie (Deep Impact).

Although the movie was entertaining and A heck of alot more realistic than it's counterpart Armageddon, I wouldn't go as far as to say that it is a study guide.

Second one:



The student will be able to re-evaluate their origianl answers after watching and analyzing the asteroid hitting the ocean.
Not an asteroid, it was a comet. I know it's a common misconception, but coming from a science teacher is pretty sad. :D

But I do have to give the teacher credit for not picking Armageddon as a study guide. :D

nebularain
2003-Apr-02, 06:50 AM
Exactly!

aurorae
2003-Apr-02, 07:56 PM
Another way to teach about impacts is by doing. We use pans filled with flour, and different sized rocks. A slingshot can get the speed up to scale. Dropping the rocks from different heights can work in school situations where a slingshot is a bad idea, although the resulting crater is not large enough in relation to the rock.

A science experiment can be created that uses different size rocks, and multiple measurements of the resulting crater sizes.

beskeptical
2003-Apr-03, 02:47 AM
Here we are with incredible access to information and teaching tools on the internet, and the university is teaching teachers to use fictional movies to learn science!

There's too much to do. I'll never get the world changed before I die. http://jm.g.free.fr/smileys/41616-4.gif

tracer
2003-Apr-07, 09:19 PM
The student will be able to try to the best of their ability to (1) answer specific questions about asteroids and (2) predict the effects of an asteroid hitting the Atlantic Ocean.
:o So ... what kind of fluid impact dynamics modelling software are the kids going to get to use?

JS Princeton
2003-Apr-10, 09:26 PM
So, neb, what's the verdict? Did the rest of the class look at you funny when you started decrying the generally horrible state of ignorance the lesson plan was exhibitting?

nebularain
2003-Apr-11, 02:35 AM
All my teacher gave me was a, "Yeah, there is that - but what's wrong with his lesson plan?"

:roll:

(I'm the only one in the class who's an Earth and Space Science buff. The rest are biology and chemistry.)

What can one do?