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kucharek
2003-Apr-02, 08:57 AM
Slightly off-topic, but maybe it's fun for you, too.

Yesterday, my little five year old son always came flying his LEGO spacecrafts into the living room. As I was a little bit tired, I asked Lukas several times to stay in his - pretty large - room. After the third or fourth admonition, he finally complained: "Daddy, you always tell me that space is very, very, very big, and so my room isn't big enough for playing spaceflight only there."

Harald

DStahl
2003-Apr-02, 09:18 AM
Sounds like he needs infinite space! When I was a child my parents had a house which had a 'roundabout'--you could run through the kitchen into the dining area and around through another room back to the kitchen. This was a model, in child-dimension, of a finite but unbounded universe. My sister and brother and I circumnavigated this universe many times.

Your post made me laugh. Thanks!

beskeptical
2003-Apr-02, 09:38 AM
Five year olds do not want to play alone. My guess is it has nothing to do with 'space'.

Enjoy it while you can. My 13 year old, (eek 14 this month), is spending more and more time in his 'space'. He still makes it clear though, he wants Mom time. Usually it takes the form of having to talk about something trivially important at his bedtime. :D

kucharek
2003-Apr-02, 09:42 AM
Sounds like he needs infinite space! When I was a child my parents had a house which had a 'roundabout'--you could run through the kitchen into the dining area and around through another room back to the kitchen. This was a model, in child-dimension, of a finite but unbounded universe. My sister and brother and I circumnavigated this universe many times.
He raised that question a few days before, what happens when he gets to the edge of the universe. I tried to tell him about the surface-of-a-sphere analogy and space-time curvature and he really started to argue with me. He said, when he walked off from Karlsruhe and goes on and on, then finally he will get back to Karlsruhe, so a sphere's surface isn't infinite. I had to refine my sloppy speech to differentiate between infinite and unbounded.

A week ago, when I brought him to the kindergarten, he suddenly asked me: "Daddy, when the Earth is turning, why don't I feel anything of it?"

Unfortunately, he was just one and a half year old when we had the total eclipse here in august 1999 and we had luckily a gap in the clouds and were able to watch the total phase. We just watched the video I took a few days ago and he asked: "Daddy, didn't Alan Bean (Apollo 12) killed a video camera by pointing it at the sun? Why didn't your video camera broke?"

Harald

DStahl
2003-Apr-02, 09:45 AM
Off-topic: Goodness, beskeptical, what are you doing awake at this hour?

Yes, my 13-year-old is inhabiting an alien world at this time. All the creatures on his planet can avoid the consequences of their actions--causality is, in their frame of reference, suspended. Sometimes they themselves are also suspended...from school.

Meanwhile, on a planet far far away, their parents (ME!) are enveloped in a hazy fog which corrodes self-control and causes them to scream uncontrollably at random intervals.

The universe is a weird place.

[Harald, you posted while I was writing to beskeptical.]

You, my friend, have a very intelligent child! It sounds like you are his mentor and good companion. No doubt you will learn a lot from him!

kucharek
2003-Apr-02, 09:48 AM
Five year olds do not want to play alone. My guess is it has nothing to do with 'space'.
Be assured that I spend as much time as possible with my children (I also have a 7 1/2 year old daughter). Lukas really can spend some time alone with his LEGOs and can be pretty upset if you disturb him. But most time, he likes to build and play with me. One of his favorite indoor activities with me is, to take some spaceflight or astronomy book, going through the pages and asking me all kind of questions about the pictures, trying to solve the mysteries and riddles they give him.

Harald

beskeptical
2003-Apr-02, 10:05 AM
kucharek,

In no way was I implying you didn't spend enough time nor shouldn't need a moment to yourself. I just meant kids communicate in another language. For example, at 13, "I need to talk to you Mom", means I don't want to go to bed. :lol:

DStahl, and what are you doing up at this hour? :P

I am not a morning person, I have my own business so I get flex time sometimes, and, I seem to run on a 25-28 hour schedule so I get out of balance with the Sun.

kucharek
2003-Apr-02, 10:13 AM
I just meant kids communicate in another language.
Yep. And females put another layer over this... :lol:


For example, at 13, "I need to talk to you Mom", means I don't want to go to bed.
As you surely knows, that starts much, much earlier... :-)

Harald

DStahl
2003-Apr-02, 10:17 AM
beskeptical: "DStahl, and what are you doing up at this hour?"

Berating myself for not going to bed at a reasonable time. Also, I usually work until 02:00....swingshift. Bah.

'G'night, all, I must to my musty sheets retire. May plangent Sirius and limpid Aldebaran light your dreams.

aporetic_r
2003-Apr-02, 02:05 PM
I have often suspected that the best part about having kids will be the constant stream of questions that I will be obligated to at least try to answer.

Aporetic

Mainframes
2003-Apr-02, 02:35 PM
I have often suspected that the best part about having kids will be the constant stream of questions that I will be obligated to at least try to answer.

Aporetic

There has got to be some sort of buzz knowing that you are helping them to learn stuff, especially when they get that look of awe on their face when you show them something cool, like say Saturn....

traztx
2003-Apr-02, 04:02 PM
You think good astronomy is dangerous?

Wait till he learns good rocket science ;)

beskeptical
2003-Apr-02, 07:32 PM
Ah yes, the old days.. Now, at 13, not interested in learning anything from Mom. I know longer know anything of importance.

But, I have faith. This too shall pass and once again I will take that place of equal exchange, no longer all knowing but at least respected. :)

Colt
2003-Apr-03, 12:13 AM
Since I don't have any children yet (or at least I better not somehow..) I can not really relate to being a parent. On the other hand since my childhood (if you can call it that) has so recently passed I suppose I can expound on that a bit.

Our house is pretty small so I spent most of my time in my room (as I do now) playing. I have built many spacecraft but most of them were lander type of vehicles. The dresser would be orbit where the mothership sat and the smaller landing craft would descend off of this and down to the landscape of the Blue Carpet. My landers were actually designed like landers, not a Buck Rogers type of spaceship. :D I did not want to be bothered at all really since I was in my own world (also, my family is very astronomy deficient). I designed my own starship for Star Trek and built it (it consumed most of my pieces so I had to take it apart eventually) It was perhaps the most amazing thing I have created with my Lego pieces to-date. Oddly enough I never built any warships. :-?

Since I am ony three years older than your thirteen year-olds, and perhaps am closer in mindset to them, I offer my thoughts. When I was playing with my Lego parts (never say "Legos", it is incorrect :wink: ) I was in my own world. I could create almost anything that my mind could imagine. The Lego sets allowed me to attempt to recreate the Apollo, Gemini, and Mercury rockets. My advice is to let them alone, they will come to you when they want company. :) This is all my opinion of course so take it as you will. -Colt

g99
2003-Apr-03, 12:28 AM
Never had kids. Well at least that is the offical story. I am only 21, so i hope they don't show their heads untill i am at least 40. :-)

Seriously. I remember playing with my sibilings at that age (1 sis, 3 bro's). One of our favorite things was to build ships or cars out of lego's and see who could build the most sturdy ones. (by the way doesn't this topic seem like a big add for LEGO? :-)).

I have been a camp counselor for several years and at several overnight camps in Georgia, Jacksonville, and California. I have delt with all ages from 5 top 15. They are all really cool. I can't wait till i have kids. Now the whole first two years will suck. But once they start talking, i will love it. From the two months i spent with the kids at each of the camps, they can get anoying. But once you get to know them and deal with them it is so enlightening. You really learn alot about yourself from just seeing how they feel about you and how you interact with them.

I am actually jealous of all of you who have the ability to have someone to look up to you every day. (literally and figuratively).

honestmonkey
2003-Apr-03, 12:49 AM
"When I was a boy of fourteen, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be twenty-one, I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years."

Conceivably a quote by Mark Twain, and one of my favorites.

kucharek
2003-Apr-03, 07:23 AM
I can't wait till i have kids. Now the whole first two years will suck. But once they start talking, i will love it.
I've learnt from my kids, that this is one of the biggest misconceptions. These kids were personalities from the first second and you could do plenty of communication with them from the beginning.

Harald

PS: On LEGO, yesterday I saw this (http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-021703a.html). Scroll halfway down.

g99
2003-Apr-03, 07:37 AM
totaly useless fact: The Lego company was started in Denmark (http://www.scandinavica.com/denmark.htm). It is one of their largest export.

Tune in next week to find out the origin of the fortune cookie....:-)

Iain Lambert
2003-Apr-03, 10:14 AM
Kucharek, thanks enormously for that link - I must get this new Lego. The Mars Rover in particular is amazing.

Thumper
2003-Apr-03, 12:28 PM
I can't wait till i have kids. Now the whole first two years will suck. But once they start talking, i will love it.
I've learnt from my kids, that this is one of the biggest misconceptions. These kids were personalities from the first second and you could do plenty of communication with them from the beginning.

Harald

I agree with Kucharek, now. I have a three year old (almost). g99 I admit I may have shared that attitude before she was born (actually, I was scared to death), but every day she does something amazing. She had attitude and personality from the moment she was born and watching her attempts at communication has been really neat.

(fixed bbcode)

gethen
2003-Apr-03, 02:42 PM
Harald, you have so much to look forward to with your son. 15 or 20 years ago I remember watching Cosmos with my own young son and trying to field questions that were well beyond his years. Today he's the one trying to answer my sad questions. I think it's the Legos. And I am sure that beskeptical would agree that even those trying teenagers have their charm--when they choose to use it.

Reacher
2003-Apr-03, 04:41 PM
I'm only 15, so my lego days weren't that long ago. just tuesday, in fact;)
i got bored with mine very quickly. you cant make things move! i remember once, i spent heaps of time in my room, and came out screaming "Dad, dad, this is amazing! look what ive made! put your finger here..." i produced a contraption made, i will admit, mostly of lego and mechano, etc. it moved. it drove two pins into his finger. boy, did i get scunted for that! Once, in a house we used to live in, my doorlocked from the outside, due to the previous owners. my dad was chasing me, and i entered my room, grabbed some of my sisters drawing pins(thumb tacks, for those Americans among us), threw them across the door way. he steps on them, emits that "oof" sound that you adults seem to often substitute for swearing, and fell over. i jumped over him and locked him in. i let him out pretty quick, when i reallised the deep *#!@ i was in.
how devious are you guys(and ladies)? i love these stories.

g99
2003-Apr-04, 01:21 AM
Hmm..So is agreed than. I will have a kid and then the second he/she talks they are out on the street. :P j/k

What did i do as a kid? Well i wasn't the best kid. I used to beat up my sister and younger brother. When i got in trouble i used to act to get out of it. Whenever my dad would spank me i would just make myself cry and wail right away and he would stop. No punishhment learned except how to decieve my parents in punishment.

When i was older i had a T.V. in my room. It consisted of a Commidor 64 monitor attached to a VCR fthat had cable attached to it. The VCR attached to the monitor by AV cords. Whenever my parents would punish me they would take the AV cords so i could not watch TV. But i knew that this would happen after the first time they did it. So the next chance i got i took a extra AV cord from the garage and hid it in my room. I would then connect that and watch t.v. :-)
Never underestimate the imagination and sneakyness of a ten year old.

gethen
2003-Apr-04, 03:34 AM
On the subject of too smart for their own good kids: my youngest figured out the standardized test routine at about age 6. If you have to fill in one circle to answer each question, the quickest way to take the test is to just fill in the first circle after each question. Then you're done. Of course, the kid tested a moron. The teacher, who was a bit smarter, made him retake the test one on one with her and he tested way above the norm. He also was not required to take any more of those tests for a long time--they thought he was maybe ADHD or something. I figured he was more likely just not interested in the test.

SKY
2003-Apr-04, 03:56 AM
My son is almost two years old. I was terrified at first. I could not imagine myself as a father. After a lot of crying and screaming for mommy...I calmed down and started admiring the little things he did. He amazes me every day with something new he learns. Everytime my wife and I pass by a childs telescope I tell my wife that I'm going to buy one for him.

Colt
2003-Apr-04, 04:27 AM
Gasp! Someone who is younger than me! Reacher, welcome to the board. That is the first post I have seen of yours.

I must have the Saturn V Lego set! And I still play with my Legos (ok, ok, it is too hard to use Lego properly without the s..). Whenever I have inspiration for something.

I built a Lego Machine Gun which actually works (see my site (http://www.geocities.com/wandererofthewastes/index.html)), beat that. I based it off of some plans for one I found on the internet. Lego MG (http://www.silverlight.org/Cray/lego/machinegun.asp#h77) I emailed the guy a few times back and forth but I think he started being kind of scared (?) when I started talking about creating insertable magazines and ones that were springloaded instead of the verdammt gravity feed. I highly suggest attempting to build one if you have the parts and ingenuity to get it to work by looking at the guy's drawings. If you do try and having any questions just PM me.

Mmm... Saturn V Lego set.. -Colt

Daro
2003-Apr-04, 10:40 AM
Well now Reacher isn't the only person younger than you. Im actually the youngest in this thread (by a month).

Well I am 15 too and was interested in astronomy as young as when I was a toddler. My mum would ask me if I wanted to be an astronaught, and even then I had enough brains to say "no, because its to dangerous" 8) .

I was lucky that my family got me lots of books on astronomy which I loved as a child. As I grew up I lost most interested but ever scince I found Bad Astronomy last year, I have been hooked back onto it again (and some Sci Fi in my spare time).

I too had lego as a kid but my parents didn't want to 'upgrade' our lego set meant for 5-7 year olds because my lego set for toders (with ridiculously huge pieces designed so kids can't swallow them) was just sitting in the corner going to waste and they knew that would happen to my current set. I had a friend with what must have been in excess of $1000 of Techno-Lego. He could build an all automatic house that would rival LG's digital home network, or the closest you could come to it with lego. :)
I dont care what anybody says. When I have kids, I will get them as much lego as they want because I think it is an integral fun learning toy that helps kids learn on thier own. Which brick patter is the sturdiest etc...
I could go into more detail about forming proper neural pathways, but I would be just BSing :-?

darkhunter
2003-Apr-04, 11:36 AM
My kids got Lego, K'Nex.....always biulding planes and spacecraft. My oldest is starting to build model car kits, though

Reacher
2003-Apr-04, 07:09 PM
Why thanks for the welcome, Colt. i wonder about your age, considering that you apparently joined in 1969...
Daro, im not happy with you. not nice. you didnt even mention that we know each other.
we go to school together, btw.
i'm happy that u finally joined the boards, tho. welcome.