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View Full Version : Discovery will Launch July 1, Despite Objections



Fraser
2006-Jun-18, 03:35 AM
It's been a long hard road to bring the space shuttle fleet back to service after falling foam led to the destruction of Columbia. Although Discovery launched again last year, hopes sunk after the external fuel tank shed foam again, even after all the new safety measures taken by NASA. Once again, NASA thinks it's ready for launch. This time Discovery will blast off on July 1, to link up with the International Space Station. But the launch decision didn't come easy.

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2006/06/17/discovery-will-launch-july-1-despite-objections/)

DaveElPaso
2006-Jun-18, 09:52 PM
The Space Shuttle has long outlived its usefulness. It has become an icon for budget shortfalls, a lack of vision regarding space exploration and the serious need for an updated vehicle for taking humans into space.

antoniseb
2006-Jun-18, 10:21 PM
It has become an icon for budget shortfalls, a lack of vision regarding space exploration and the serious need for an updated vehicle for taking humans into space.

Hi DaveElPaso, welcome to the BAUT forum.

You might be right about the shuttle. When it was being designed they had good intentions, and I'm sure didn't think so much about how the project would feel at the end of its life. The new plan is starting to be defined, and perhaps the shuttle's woes will give the new project a more positive public view.

adriaanbw
2006-Jun-19, 11:43 AM
I have to agree that the Shuttle is now a wasteful money sink. I believe they should axe it now and put them in a few museums around the world while they still have a few left to do so.

All funding should be immediately diverted to the CEV programs and focus on the Moon/Mars efforts. The ISS is also a waste of funds at the point in time, IMO. Don't get me wrong, the idea of it is great but the vision of the ISS in its infancy is certainly not what it has matured into.

altizar
2006-Jun-19, 02:56 PM
I don't know. I think the delay has been a perfect example of what I call the [THINLY DISGUISED EXPLETIVE REMOVED BY MODERATOR] (waste product of a chicken) of America.

Granted I want it to be relatively safe, but in all honesty lets not foregt that what we're doing is effectively sticking a chair ontop of a pile of TNT and sticking a match to it. No matter what we do, that is going to be an intrensically dangerous process.

And just think all the Billions and Billions of dollars spent making this process
.01 % safer could have been spent finding a better way to do it.

My bad make that the 2nd perfect example of cowardice in America!!

ToSeek
2006-Jun-19, 03:08 PM
Altizar, please be careful of your language. Thinly disguised profanity is not allowed on this forum. (See #3 of our rules (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=32864).) Thanks.

TDFLM
2006-Jun-19, 06:02 PM
Many may think the shuttle is a waste of money, then many, many other things the government does is a waste of taxpayer money. But I for one will be there to see it take off and wish them luck!

Patty
Florida

DaveElPaso
2006-Jun-21, 01:50 PM
Patty, I wish them luck, too. I sincerely wish, however, that we would invest more research dollars into a better designed vehicle. The crews that we send deserve as much. I think there's something about human beings going to the places to research and explore first hand.

DaveElPaso
2006-Jun-21, 01:56 PM
Hi DaveElPaso, welcome to the BAUT forum.

You might be right about the shuttle. When it was being designed they had good intentions, and I'm sure didn't think so much about how the project would feel at the end of its life. The new plan is starting to be defined, and perhaps the shuttle's woes will give the new project a more positive public view.

I would like to think this will happen. However, given the setbacks with putting this next flight into space, I think NASA is treading on the same dangerous ground--attempting to push through flights for the sake of image building and reputation. I realize this is most likely not the intentions, but the facts are out there. There appear to be many issues, the fuel tank foam for example, that haven't been fully resolved. Putting a flight into orbit at this point simply reinforces negative perceptions about the program...and perhaps may negatively impact future humans-into-space-programs.