PDA

View Full Version : Strange Supernova



owlhoot
2006-Jun-19, 01:52 PM
Scientists are not sure what to make of this nova. It doesn't follow the rules. It's spectrum is wrong, it's location is wrong and it's size and luminosity are wrong. Any ideas?

http://www.newscientistspace.com/article/dn9360-enigmatic-object-baffles-supernova-team.html
(http://www.newscientistspace.com/article/dn9360-enigmatic-object-baffles-supernova-team.html)

Ronald Brak
2006-Jun-19, 02:10 PM
I told Spiff to be more careful with the anitmatter converters...

antoniseb
2006-Jun-19, 02:14 PM
This is interesting. There are a few things that come to mind as possible causes, though I suspect most of them could be ruled out quickly with a little thought.
- It could be an interstellar cloud colliding with a dormant SMBH, forming a temprary quasar.
- It could be (as noted in the article) a z=4 supernova of a population III giant.
- It could be LGMs with a really bright flashlight playing a trick on us.

ngc3314
2006-Jun-19, 02:52 PM
What a tease! How about some coordinates?? And what wavelength ranges they've observed? A z>4 pop III supernova can't help having a whopping Lyman break observed at 600 nm or longer. That's about where the possible absorption lines they mention would show up if they might be Ca II at z~0.5.

Blob
2006-Jun-19, 03:16 PM
Hum,
i guess that it was SN2006am in NGC 5630. Though that was discovered by LOSS

antoniseb
2006-Jun-19, 03:40 PM
And there is no sign of a host galaxy, which should be visible.

This seems to suggest that it couldn't be SN2006am which is embedded in 5630.

Ara Pacis
2006-Jun-19, 06:44 PM
Hmm, any chance that it's a distant relativistic ship firing rockets for decelleration and interception with the earth in such a way that it appears to stay in the same apparent position in the sky?

:D

antoniseb
2006-Jun-19, 06:50 PM
Hmm, any chance that it's a distant relativistic ship
Yes, though odd are *very* small for that explanation. We're better off ruling out all possible natural phenomena before really embracing this idea.

John Kierein
2006-Jun-19, 09:17 PM
A nearby object undergoing a flare? Like the gamma ray flare seen on the sun with a red shift of 0.008 for heavier elements and less for lighter elements. (Seen by RHESSI spacecraft.)
http://sprg.ssl.berkeley.edu/adminstuff/webpubs/2003_ajl_L81.pdf
I think that red shift was Compton, with the heavier elements releasing more electrons for a bigger red shift. This object must be rotating slowly or perhaps the whole star is flaring all over for some reason? Produces an intrinsic red shift.

George
2006-Jun-20, 03:23 AM
How intriguing. Shooting from the hip...perhaps it's a yellowed white dwarf gone supernova. Could a dark cloud between us block the view, hence the yellowing, yet be a small enough cloud to allow the reflected light, from prior ejecta, reach us?

owlhoot
2006-Jun-20, 05:14 AM
How intriguing. Shooting from the hip...perhaps it's a yellowed white dwarf gone supernova. Could a dark cloud between us block the view, hence the yellowing, yet be a small enough cloud to allow the reflected light, from prior ejecta, reach us?

They are getting their spectral data from a redshifted source. Either their conversion model is wrong, or the source of the light is not where they think it is. Could there be such a thing as an infrared nova?

George
2006-Jun-21, 12:26 AM
They are getting their spectral data from a redshifted source.
Could a progenitor produce a bipolar flow, only slightly misalilgned with Earth, with the effect of blocking much of the supernova's direct light, while the far, and high speed, ejecta reflecting the sn light with the redshift observed? [Know that I am exercising my amateur prerogative, at others expense, I fear.]

publiusr
2006-Jun-29, 09:05 PM
Perhaps an ancient collision of two stars?

Launch window
2006-Sep-21, 05:20 AM
The Weirdest Type IA Supernova Yet
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=20858