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View Full Version : Here we go again, another close call.



ggremlin
2006-Jul-01, 08:11 AM
That which does not kill us, makes great news story (http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/content/local_news/epaper/2006/07/01/m1a_asteroid_0701.html)

I love this Quote
Based on its reflected light, astronomers estimate the asteroid is 700 feet to a half-mile across.

Maksutov
2006-Jul-01, 11:54 AM
That which does not kill us, makes great news story (http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/content/local_news/epaper/2006/07/01/m1a_asteroid_0701.html)

I love this QuoteI like this one even better:
Compare that to the 110-mile-wide comet or asteroid that struck the Yucatan peninsula and arguably caused the extinction of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago.Pretty neat that a 110-mile-wide object resulted in a 112-mile diameter crater. Of course the rock that produced the Chicxulub Crater was actually about 10K (or 6.2 miles) in diameter.

parallaxicality
2006-Jul-01, 12:24 PM
What would happen to the Earth if it was struck by a 100-mile wide asteroid?

bugon
2006-Jul-01, 02:12 PM
I like this one even better: Pretty neat that a 110-mile-wide object resulted in a 112-mile diameter crater. Of course the rock that produced the Chicxulub Crater was actually about 10K (or 6.2 miles) in diameter.

Maybe it was 110 miles across, and hit Earth at 30 cm/sec and not 30 km/sec... :think:

Just kiddin' of course. Even if it was on an orbit very similar to that of Earth, the gravitational pull would imply that it had to hit Earth at 11km/s (Earth's escape velocity).

bugon
2006-Jul-01, 02:13 PM
... that it had to hit Earth at 11km/s (Earth's escape velocity).

or more of course. (Typically you would expect ~ 30 km/s, but can be as high as twice as much).

TheBlackCat
2006-Jul-01, 03:16 PM
A book I have says ceres is 568 miles in diamater and would leave a crater the size of France. We would probably also be looking at serious damage to Earth's crust. If they are right about there being a crater in Antarctica and it being responsible for the creation of Australia, we would be looking at a 30 miles wide asteroid breaking a continent in two. So a 100 mile-wide asteroid would lead to some extremely serious tectonic disturbances.

NEOWatcher
2006-Jul-05, 01:21 PM
I love this Quote
I love the whole thing. Forget information, let's just make a whole bunch of allegorical statements.

In earthbound terms, it's the love bug that zipped past your windshield, barely missing the rearview mirror.
Wasn't the love bug a car?
Not to worry. It can't turn left (the asteroid, not the love bug).
Turn left? Huh?
"Keep in mind the windshield's a lot harder than the Earth, relatively speaking," Giorgini said. And the asteroid is much harder than a love bug.
And then discount the analogy...
"In the next 20 to 30 years, we'll have a complete catalog of hazardous objects,"
So they will find them all? Uh, maybe "known objects"?
Soon we'll be able to mark our calendars for the apocalypse.
Oh goody, I've been hoping to get an official date.

ToSeek
2006-Jul-05, 03:18 PM
Wasn't the love bug a car?

Not necessarily. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Love_bug) I understand Gulf Coast residents find "love bugs" extremely annoying.