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Argos
2006-Jul-04, 03:06 PM
In Portuguese there are distinct words for describing an aircraft [or spacecraft] touch down. If it is on land the word is "aterrisagem"; on the sea the word is "amerisagem". I´ve never seen such a distinction in English. Is there any?

gwiz
2006-Jul-04, 03:10 PM
In Portuguese there are distinct words for describing an aircraft [or spacecraft] touch down. If it is on land the word is "aterrisagem"; on the sea the word is "amerisagem". Iīve never seen such a distinction in English. Is there any?
Splashdown.

Nicolas
2006-Jul-04, 03:22 PM
mishap :)

Argos
2006-Jul-04, 03:24 PM
hmm, but how about this passage (http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/archie_bombercommand/raidonscharnhorstandgneisenau.html):" Subsequently the aircraft made a successful landing on the sea and the crew took to the dinghy, 1315 hrs, until rescued. Visibility Excellent."

I`ve pick one example, but the 'sea landing' expression seems to be very common.

Nicolas
2006-Jul-04, 03:28 PM
Well, I recently found that the dictionary could give no concise English terms for the Dutch "prop" and "kerstbal".

A well known one is that English has no "overmorgen", only "the day after tomorrow".

On the other hand, in Dutch you can't give today a short possessive form, so "today's" becomes "van vandaag" (of today).

Larry Jacks
2006-Jul-04, 03:29 PM
If it is an emergency water landing, it's called "ditching."

For spacecraft like Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo, they called it "splashdown."

mantiss
2006-Jul-04, 05:18 PM
In Portuguese there are distinct words for describing an aircraft [or spacecraft] touch down. If it is on land the word is "aterrisagem"; on the sea the word is "amerisagem". Iīve never seen such a distinction in English. Is there any?

Same goes in french, atterrisage and amerissage, so in english, it would literally translate to landing and (I guess) seading (which sounds silly and vaguely like a breeding term :rolleyes:) That probably explains the why they just use splashdown. ;)

Ara Pacis
2006-Jul-04, 06:15 PM
touchdown and splashdown.

Argos
2006-Jul-04, 06:39 PM
Same goes in french, atterrisage and amerissage, so in english, it would literally translate to landing and (I guess) seading (which sounds silly and vaguely like a breeding term :rolleyes:) That probably explains the why they just use splashdown. ;)

Thatīs an explanation. :) ;)

mugaliens
2006-Jul-05, 09:38 PM
Well, I recently found that the dictionary could give no concise English terms for the Dutch "prop" and "kerstbal".

A well known one is that English has no "overmorgen", only "the day after tomorrow".

On the other hand, in Dutch you can't give today a short possessive form, so "today's" becomes "van vandaag" (of today).

Prop is muzzle. Is the spelling right on kerstbal?

alainprice
2006-Jul-06, 01:40 AM
Amerissage does exist in french, but I had to look it up to be sure. It is not a word that is used by the public.

btw, sea landing? lol!!!

Argos
2006-Jul-06, 01:18 PM
Back in the Apollo days, 'amerissagem' [Portuguese] was widely used here. Its use in Brazilian Portuguese is more common than the correlate word in French.