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View Full Version : Ozone Recovery is Going Slowly



Fraser
2006-Jul-04, 06:21 PM
Although the Earth's ozone layer is on the mend, the recovery is going more slowly than expected. Scientists have developed a new computer model that takes existing atmospheric data and correctly reproduces the size and shape of the ozone hole above Antarctica for the past 27 years. The model then predicts into the future, forecasting that the ozone hole will stick around until 2068, and not 2050 as scientists originally believed.

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2006/07/04/ozone-recovery-is-going-slowly/)

ASEI
2006-Jul-04, 07:41 PM
I thought it was gone for a period of time last year? Does it oscillate or something?

ToSeek
2006-Jul-05, 12:22 AM
The ozone hole above Antarctica oscillates annually, reaching a minimum during the coldest part of the winter.

TheBlackCat
2006-Jul-05, 03:49 AM
Ice crystals act as a substrate for the reaction where chlorine catalyzes the conversion of ozone into oxygen molecules. The reaction is very slow without the ice crystals, but is much faster with them. Therefore the hole tends to grow in areas with ice crystals in the upper atmosphere, such as the north and south poles (the south pole especially), and is most severe during the winter when ice crystals are more common and thus the ozone-destroying reaction is proceeding at a much faster rate than it can be replenished. During the summer the ice crystals largely disappear and the reaction slows, pushing the balance more towards ozone formation and thus reducing the hole somewhat.

Ronald Brak
2006-Jul-05, 04:02 AM
Ice crystals act as a substrate for the reaction where chlorine catalyzes the conversion of ozone into oxygen molecules. The reaction is very slow without the ice crystals, but is much faster with them. Therefore the hole tends to grow in areas with ice crystals in the upper atmosphere, such as the north and south poles (the south pole especially), and is most severe during the winter when ice crystals are more common and thus the ozone-destroying reaction is proceeding at a much faster rate than it can be replenished. During the summer the ice crystals largely disappear and the reaction slows, pushing the balance more towards ozone formation and thus reducing the hole somewhat.

So does this mean that increased global warming will cause the ozone hole to decrease in size? (Even though I'm sitting near the damn hole, personally I don't think the tradeoff is worth it.)